Why do some elements need to form compounds with themselves?

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Will_W
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As the title says. Is it specifically all the non-metals apart from the noble gases that do this? Why do they do it? Please help. Thanks.
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Sinnoh
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Can't really answer the second part of your question 😬 but it's only hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and all the halogens that do it.
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Will_W
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Can't really answer the second part of your question 😬 but it's only hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and all the halogens that do it.
Thank you that's all i need for the exam so it's cool
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Meowstic
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Noble gases have full outer shells so can't really share electrons. It's not energetically favourable to start filling more shells
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charco
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(Original post by Will_W)
As the title says. Is it specifically all the non-metals apart from the noble gases that do this? Why do they do it? Please help. Thanks.
All atoms (except noble gas atoms) are unstable and gain stability by bonding with themselves.
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ThatGuy107
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In reality, most elements actually form some form of compound with themselves except for noble gases;

Metals lose their outer shell electrons forming a lattice of positive metal ions surrounded by a cloud of delocalised electrons

Group 4 elements form giant covalent structures (Like Diamond!) where each atom is covalently bonded to a number of other atoms to fill up their electron outer shell (e.g. 4 in carbon)

Groups 5,6 & 7 generally form relatively small molecules such as O2 by sharing electrons between the molecules to fill up their outer electron shell

Noble Gasses have a full outer shell so are just single atoms

Metals lose electrons as it is far easier for them to lose these 1-3 electrons than gain 7-5 electrons, similar idea for gaining the electrons for the other compounds
Hope this helped!
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Pigster
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Surely a compound is two (or more) different elements bonded together.

If an element bonds to itself, it can't be a compound - a molecule maybe, but not a compound.
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ThatGuy107
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(Original post by Pigster)
Surely a compound is two (or more) different elements bonded together.

If an element bonds to itself, it can't be a compound - a molecule maybe, but not a compound.
I believe OP is referring to elemental molecules when they say compounds
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