Marks and spencer accused of cultural appropriation Watch

Notoriety
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#41
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#41
(Original post by the bear)
Wagon Wheels are an appalling appropriation of early American settler culture. They should be banned immediately.
Don't get me started on Penguins ... A gross example of human chauvinists stealing from and mocking the culture of those frosty explorers. The birdies are not here for your amusement.
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the bear
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Notoriety)
Don't get me started on Penguins ... A gross example of human chauvinists stealing from and mocking the culture of those frosty explorers. The birdies are not here for your amusement.
this is just the "tip of the iceberg".... although that would also be infringing Inuit cultural property and traditions. :emo:

https://www.citi.io/wp-content/uploa...11/1446-01.jpg
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SoulfulTwist
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#43
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#43
(Original post by TimmonaPortella)
M&S call this one 'sweet potato biriyani'. Seems valid enough to me. Everyone knows basically what's meant.

Meanwhile, I'm going to go ahead and say that 1% of M&S's meal deal customer base has heard of 'akhni'. You don't do your customers any favours, let alone actually shift your goods, by labelling things in a way that nobody understands.

The relevant market runs in, glimpses a sandwich in which they might be interested, has a quick look at it, and runs out. You therefore have to name the sandwich in such a way that your customers will immediately understand roughly the sort of thing they're going to get.

It's a perfectly proper use of the term 'biriyani' to communicate that in this case.
Nothing like biryani at all though
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TimmonaPortella
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#44
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#44
(Original post by SoulfulTwist)
Nothing like biryani at all though
I don't think they or their customers really care though.

The only people who care are like a couple of hundred nuance-free obsessives.
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SoulfulTwist
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#45
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#45
(Original post by TimmonaPortella)
I don't think they or their customers really care though.

The only people who care are like a couple of hundred nuance-free obsessives.
It's like filling a sandwich with cooked minced meat and then calling it a samosa sandwich.
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SCIENCE :D
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#46
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#46
Imagine taking 'cultural appropriation' seriously, anway.
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harrysbar
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#47
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#47
(Original post by SoulfulTwist)
It's like filling a sandwich with cooked minced meat and then calling it a samosa sandwich.
Sounds nice actually
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SoulfulTwist
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#48
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#48
(Original post by harrysbar)
Sounds nice actually
It is. A real samosa sandwich includes the somasa pastry and frying the samosa furst before breaking it up and adding it to the bread. Add some ketchup and you have a yummy sandwich. I dislike samosa but can happily have me a samosa sandwich.
Samosa sandwich is copyright btw.
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It's****ingWOODY
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Notoriety)
If you said "chicken bolognese wrap", then what's the problem? Everyone would know it is a bolognese-inspired and tasting dish, which instead is made with chicken. You seem to have a hyper-literalist approach to language, which simply does not make sense. You're like the bloke in the pub who says "the word X in 1506 meant the opposite to its modern meaning, so we're using the word incorrectly". That does not compute linguistically and obviously engages the etymological fallacy.

Food is no different. Cuisines develop away from their host country; they are not merely static. For example, we have a very tasty British Indian cuisine, completely at odds with authentic Indian cuisine. But for some reason we celebrate this diversity and these *******ised dishes are enjoyed across the globe. There are veg versions of the biryani anyway (one called tahri, and many more listed on the Wiki) -- does it really make sense for M&S to be forced to use an obscure term, which basically has the same semantic content as "veg biryani"?

Lastly, this close-mindedness is exemplified by people mocking the spelling "biriyani". Seemingly these people do not realise that the more common spelling is a mere transliteration; an attempt to Anglicise a foreign word, no more valid than any other attempt. These people focus so closely on having specialised and pure knowledge, yet ignore basic realities and I daresay common sense. They are fighting too hard to be seen as having something to say.
I don't really know how to respond other than repeating what I've already said. Judging by the responses on social media and places like TSR, there seem to be two camps divided - the "that's not a biryani mate" camp, and the "it's just a name on a food label mate, chill" camp. To me, changing the fundamental ingredients of a dish means you can't name it that dish anymore when there's already a dish with those ingredients - in the other example, it's not a chicken Bolognese, it's tomato chicken and to call it a Bolognese would be nonsense. That's me, though.
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Decahedron
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#50
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#50
(Original post by the bear)
this is just the "tip of the iceberg".... although that would also be infringing Inuit cultural property and traditions. :emo:

https://www.citi.io/wp-content/uploa...11/1446-01.jpg
Inuits live around the North Pole, Penguins are around the South Pole, the two never meet :facepalm:
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Good bloke
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#51
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#51
(Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
WTF is a "full English ravioli"???
Well, surely all ravioli are full, by definition? That is the point of a raviolo - pasta with a filling.
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It's****ingWOODY
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Good bloke)
Well, surely all ravioli are full, by definition? That is the point of a raviolo - pasta with a filling.
I wouldn't be too pleased to bite into one and find egg, beans and sausage in it, though :zomg:
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#53
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#53
(Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
I wouldn't be too pleased to bite into one and find egg, beans and sausage in it, though :zomg:
But you said you would insist on all the ingredients. How can a full English raviolo be eggless?
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Good bloke
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#54
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#54
This misleading labelling must stop. I nearly bought a packet of vegan burger until I discovered there was no hint of meat in it, not even animal meat and certainly no human meat of any description, let alone vegans.
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SoulfulTwist
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#55
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#55
(Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
I don't really know how to respond other than repeating what I've already said. Judging by the responses on social media and places like TSR, there seem to be two camps divided - the "that's not a biryani mate" camp, and the "it's just a name on a food label mate, chill" camp. To me, changing the fundamental ingredients of a dish means you can't name it that dish anymore when there's already a dish with those ingredients - in the other example, it's not a chicken Bolognese, it's tomato chicken and to call it a Bolognese would be nonsense. That's me, though.
Thank you for speaking sense! Too many people saying it just a food label.
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Pachuco
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#56
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#56
(Original post by gjd800)
Personally, I write the names of my curries only in devanagari.
:laugh:

PRSOM
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akbar0123
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#57
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#57
It doesn’t make sense though. Biryani is a rice dish with meat cooked a certain way with certain spices. This is like putting mozzarella on chow mien and calling it a pizza. But one could also argue that biryani itself was a Persian dish culturally appropriated by Indians.
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akbar0123
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#58
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#58
(Original post by londonmyst)
The court of public opinion -v- M&S
On trial for crimes against: authentic cuisine, food fusion culture (and spelling).
I don’t see why people are complaining about the spelling. It’s not originally written in a Latin alphabet, as long as it sounds how it should the spelling doesn’t matter.
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Notoriety
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#59
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#59
(Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
I don't really know how to respond other than repeating what I've already said. Judging by the responses on social media and places like TSR, there seem to be two camps divided - the "that's not a biryani mate" camp, and the "it's just a name on a food label mate, chill" camp. To me, changing the fundamental ingredients of a dish means you can't name it that dish anymore when there's already a dish with those ingredients - in the other example, it's not a chicken Bolognese, it's tomato chicken and to call it a Bolognese would be nonsense. That's me, though.
To me, that's extreme pedantry which is not matched by the pedant's everyday life. Although it is convenient and indeed attractive to claim to be so sophisticated and astute as to reject the everyday man's simple-minded errors, and to be above such. These are the same type of people who watch QI and go round their mate's to announce how clever they are for retelling half-correct facts overlooked by the average mind. Huzzah!
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It's****ingWOODY
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#60
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#60
(Original post by Notoriety)
To me, that's extreme pedantry which is not matched by the pedant's everyday life. Although it is convenient and indeed attractive to claim to be so sophisticated and astute as to reject the everyday man's simple-minded errors, and to be above such. These are the same type of people who watch QI and go round their mate's to announce how clever they are for retelling half-correct facts overlooked by the average mind. Huzzah!
Where's the correlation between a person calling something what it is, and a person being so desperate to prove one's own intellect to everyone? "You're so closed-minded, maaaaan" reeks of a "my way of thinking is beyond what your little limited mind can even comprehend" mentality in itself.

(Original post by Good bloke)
But you said you would insist on all the ingredients. How can a full English raviolo be eggless?
It wouldn't be ravioli if it had those ingredients in, would it?
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