I got all 9s in GCSE-here's how Watch

pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by Sapphire12345678)
Thanks for this great advice!!! I've been predicted 9s and I'm hoping to get your kind of success!! Thank you once again!!
You are most welcome! Good luck
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by alwinjm)
Im just wondering how you revised for sciences to get a 9. I got 778 and I want higher. Any tips?
Hey there,

I have mentioned most of it in the original post however here it is:
-Made flashcards on Quizlet : https://quizlet.com/FrenchFries26 here is the link to them, I made them based on the AQA specification, just click on the Chemistry, Biology and Physics folders. For me this was the best way to learn content. I reviewed these constantly till I was reciting them all the time in my head.

-Use the specification: it is basically a checklist. Download your exam board one from their website and tick off content you have learnt and understand. It can be very specific, for example 'Students should be able to describe the location of pacemaker cells within the heart' - ensure you can do all these things

-With science, you must practice. Learning content will only get you so far, do practice questions from workbooks, textbooks and especially this website: : https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ it has topic specific practice questions. Do past papers- you will see the same questions come up again and again

-LEARN YOUR PRACTICALS- This is really important, as practicals are more often than not 6 mark questions- make sure you know your methods, your independent, dependent and controlled variables and the 'how science works' part: how to make an experiment repeatable, reproducible, valid etc.

-Find your weak points- if you hate transformers and the National Grid in physics, revise it to death and practice questions on it. It is always the things you are less confident on which come up.

Practice is the key. If you keep at it, you will get there eventually.
All the best
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YaGorl
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Congrats on your amazing results! How many hours did you revise each day over Easter??
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halsx11
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(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
To start off, by no means do I want this to be a bragging post or acclamation of how 'smart' I am, I have received several PMs and have decided to make a post about how I actually did it- how I got a clean sweep of 9s in GCSE.
You may not believe me and that is fair enough, but hopefully you'll at least acknowledge some of the stuff I advise anyway.

Background: I did the following at GCSE-
English literature (AQA), English language(AQA), Maths(Edexcel) Religious Studies (Eduqas), French (AQA) History (Edexcel) Triple science (AQA) and Polish (AQA). I'm currently in Year 12 doing 3 A Levels: Chemistry, Biology and English Literature.
I want to study medicine or something healthcare/science related in the future so if you have any questions about that, do PM me.

The main piece of advice I would give is start early. Whilst for Year 11s the time is nearing at a scarily fast pace, Year 10s, I would urge you to start at least some sort of proper revision around Christmas time when you get to Year 11, of course revising throughout Year 10 as well.
Year 11- you should be consistently and regularly revising at this point. January is basically over and February half term will come around in no time where you really should place a lot of focus on getting some good quality studying done. During the exams and in between them, I did very minimal revision, as I had covered all my content and revision earlier in the year.

What I did: I revised throughout the school year each night- not hardcore by any means, but doing something-a set of practice questions, mindmaps, flashcards, and in this way I gradually built up a bank of good resources. I started revising more solidly at Christmas time and by Easter, I was putting in a lot of hours- Easter is really, your final chance to really give it that big push.

Techniques: First, find out what kind of learner you are. I am a visual learner, hence my techniques make sense: I made loads of flash cards. Loads. They worked particularly well for science because they ensured I knew all the content. I have attached the link to my quizlet cards: https://quizlet.com/FrenchFries26 Just go on the GCSE folders and I have plenty of flashcards with key info, model answers, etc.
Practice questions and papers. Our year group was the first to do all the new GCSEs so past papers were becoming less useful but here's the thing- examiners can't really come up with new questions, so they reuse and recycle old ones- therefore the more you practice questions, the more familiar you will be. I used physics and maths tutor: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ and still swear by it for A Level.

Maths is similar to the sciences: you can't really revise it, you have to practice it.
Essay subjects: You need to plan essays. For English, plan essays for each of the themes and characters, and then write the essays in timed conditions, hand them in to your teacher to mark, and repeat. Act upon the feedback they give you, because it is vital. Once you plan as many essays as you can, you will virtually be fully prepared. The essay which came up for me in the Shakespeare section was one I planned a while back, so all I did was I rewrote the essay from as much memory as I could, obviously changing up some parts which my teacher earlier marked a 9.
For history, you will need to know content extremely well, however most of your marks are based not on evidence, but on explanations, and so making sure you use convincing language and are not just describing will ensure you let the examiner you know what you're talking about. Practice questions.

Languages: I have a natural knack for languages, so French did not prove to be too much of a challenge for me- I saw a word, I remembered it. However what I did do, was I spent a lot of break times with my teacher practising for the spoken exam to ensure pronunciation was on point, and I consistently learned vocab, writing pieces using the words I had revised.

Exam technique is important. You need to play the examiner's game. Once you've seen all the evolution and series circuit questions there are, and planned all the essays, there is nothing that can surprise you- and you will do well.

Plan: I personally prefer todo lists rather than timetables for revision because I don't like a strict time scale, but if timetables motivate you more, use them to plan your study.

Your health, however, is also very important. Do not neglect your wellbeing for your grades, because both end up going downhill if you do.

If you have any more questions, PM me and I'll be happy to answer.

Good luck!
OMG Thanks for this advice! I really want to get 9s and the only thing you can do is actually work for it I have been revising lots I do 4-6 hrs a day! You've helped me a lot and I'll make sure all the content is covered as soon as possible even if we haven't done it in class. I'm a positive person and that just motivates me to do the best i can possibly do. I've got mocks in about 3 weeks and i'm continually revising eventhough they don't count. So for the sciences is mindmaps, flashcards and practice questions all you did? And for English Lit how did you overcome memorising everything as well as structuring your answer?
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YaGorl
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also any advice on how to revise for English language ?
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jervs
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Guys can you link any good websites and youtube channels that would help you further
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by YaGorl)
also any advice on how to revise for English language ?
Hey,
English language is a difficult one, because you can't 'revise' per se, as the text that comes up is an unseen (chances of you hvaing read it before are slim)
Hence, all you can really do is prepare. Our school created booklets with practice questions for us to do with random unseen extracts and we would do them in timed conditions- in this way you develop the skills to answer the question rather than learn 'content', as there is none.

You can come up with acronyms which is what we did in class to help you remember what you need to include in your answers. These include, but are not limited to : PETAL (Point Evidence Technique Analysis Link) PETCAR (Point Evidence Technique Connotations Analysis Reference statement) GAPS (Genre, Audience, Purpose, Style) and FAMILY (Firstly, additionally, moreover, in comparison, likewise, your opinion)

However the key thing I will stress is that (basing this on AQA), the final question is worth half the paper, thus it makes the most sense to place a lot of focus on it. In paper 1, this was a describe/narrate question while in paper 2, you will have to produce an article/speech/report/letter etc. writing to argue. What I would do is for paper 1, find random pictures online such as a beach, forest, desert, shopping centre, bus (you get the point) and write descriptive pieces about them. It can be difficult but zooming in on certain features e.g. the sky can give you a large scope for good creative writing to come through. The picture in my exam was of an old man, and what I did was I zoomed in on his eyes, then wrote up my descriptive piece about a beach as if he was looking at it. Winner.

For paper 2, our teachers would give us stimuli e.g. 'should homework be banned' for us to write persuasive letters, newspaper articles and in this way you will come up with useful phrases you can use over and over eg 'there is certainly some credit to the notion that xxxx is of vital significance'

Read as many books as you can as often you will find amazing imagery in them to reuse and recycle in your own words.

Sorry this was so long, but good luck
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by halsx11)
OMG Thanks for this advice! I really want to get 9s and the only thing you can do is actually work for it I have been revising lots I do 4-6 hrs a day! You've helped me a lot and I'll make sure all the content is covered as soon as possible even if we haven't done it in class. I'm a positive person and that just motivates me to do the best i can possibly do. I've got mocks in about 3 weeks and i'm continually revising eventhough they don't count. So for the sciences is mindmaps, flashcards and practice questions all you did? And for English Lit how did you overcome memorising everything as well as structuring your answer?
Yes those are the main things I did. I also watched some youtube videos- I highly recommend Primrose Kitten and freesciencelessons on Youtube, they explain and summarise everything amazingly.
Do check out https://www.senecalearning.com/ which is really good for many courses, (I still use it for A Level) and our school bought a programme called Tassomai- look into it if you're interested.

For English Lit, it all really came with time. The more essays I wrote, the more I remembered what worked for me and this is why I urge people to write as much as they can till they find their best techniques. Memorise quotes to death because while you can get them a little wrong, it would be disheartening if you memorised a quote wrong and substituted a word for another e.g. 'fire, blood and suffering' instead of 'fire, blood and anguish' and then go in to analyse 'suffering' - shows the examiner you didn't really revise properly and they won't give you marks.

Structure just comes along as you go through and write more and more, but the key has always been for me intro, point + analysis, point + analysis, point+ analysis and conclusion. If I was running low on time then 2 developed paragraphs but by the end of Y11 I was comfortably writing 3 in the time given.
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foxstudy
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Well done on your GCSE grades ! I'm currently doing my A levels and i'm studying similar subjects to you. I was just wondering, how are you revising at the moment? And do you know any good websites, youtube channels, etc for biology and chemistry?
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by foxstudy)
Well done on your GCSE grades ! I'm currently doing my A levels and i'm studying similar subjects to you. I was just wondering, how are you revising at the moment? And do you know any good websites, youtube channels, etc for biology and chemistry?
Hey, thanks!
https://www.senecalearning.com/ https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ https://www.chemguide.co.uk/ https://alevelbiology.co.uk/ are ones I currently use at the moment- practice questions are the best way for me to revise, which is what I do most of the time. This helps me to prepare for the mocks in the best way possible I can't seem to find too many Youtube channels but do let me know if you do.
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foxstudy
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(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Hey, thanks!
https://www.senecalearning.com/ https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ https://www.chemguide.co.uk/ https://alevelbiology.co.uk/ are ones I currently use at the moment- practice questions are the best way for me to revise, which is what I do most of the time. This helps me to prepare for the mocks in the best way possible I can't seem to find too many Youtube channels but do let me know if you do.
Tailored tutors for biology and allerytutors for chemistry are the ones i'm using atm. Never used seneca or physicsandmathstutor but it's annoying because you don't find many WJEC resources .
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by foxstudy)
Tailored tutors for biology and allerytutors for chemistry are the ones i'm using atm. Never used seneca or physicsandmathstutor but it's annoying because you don't find many WJEC resources .
I do WJEC English Lit, I know.... thanks for the recommendations, I will be on the lookout
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halsx11
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(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Yes those are the main things I did. I also watched some youtube videos- I highly recommend Primrose Kitten and freesciencelessons on Youtube, they explain and summarise everything amazingly.
Do check out https://www.senecalearning.com/ which is really good for many courses, (I still use it for A Level) and our school bought a programme called Tassomai- look into it if you're interested.

For English Lit, it all really came with time. The more essays I wrote, the more I remembered what worked for me and this is why I urge people to write as much as they can till they find their best techniques. Memorise quotes to death because while you can get them a little wrong, it would be disheartening if you memorised a quote wrong and substituted a word for another e.g. 'fire, blood and suffering' instead of 'fire, blood and anguish' and then go in to analyse 'suffering' - shows the examiner you didn't really revise properly and they won't give you marks.

Structure just comes along as you go through and write more and more, but the key has always been for me intro, point + analysis, point + analysis, point+ analysis and conclusion. If I was running low on time then 2 developed paragraphs but by the end of Y11 I was comfortably writing 3 in the time given.
Thanks for the advice i have already got seneca and it's really good! Yeah i'm literally learning all the quotes and doing as many past paper questions!
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mpaprika
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wooh a fellow Polish person!! Did you do your polish exam in 2018 or a year earlier?
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by mpaprika)
wooh a fellow Polish person!! Did you do your polish exam in 2018 or a year earlier?
Dzien dobry! Did mine in 2017, in Year 10.
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halsx11
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Goodnight everyone x
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mpaprika
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(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Dzien dobry! Did mine in 2017, in Year 10.
ahh ja też w roku dziesiątym pisałam , Are you going to do it for AS?
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alwinjm
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(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Hey there,

I have mentioned most of it in the original post however here it is:
-Made flashcards on Quizlet : https://quizlet.com/FrenchFries26 here is the link to them, I made them based on the AQA specification, just click on the Chemistry, Biology and Physics folders. For me this was the best way to learn content. I reviewed these constantly till I was reciting them all the time in my head.

-Use the specification: it is basically a checklist. Download your exam board one from their website and tick off content you have learnt and understand. It can be very specific, for example 'Students should be able to describe the location of pacemaker cells within the heart' - ensure you can do all these things

-With science, you must practice. Learning content will only get you so far, do practice questions from workbooks, textbooks and especially this website: : https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ it has topic specific practice questions. Do past papers- you will see the same questions come up again and again

-LEARN YOUR PRACTICALS- This is really important, as practicals are more often than not 6 mark questions- make sure you know your methods, your independent, dependent and controlled variables and the 'how science works' part: how to make an experiment repeatable, reproducible, valid etc.

-Find your weak points- if you hate transformers and the National Grid in physics, revise it to death and practice questions on it. It is always the things you are less confident on which come up.

Practice is the key. If you keep at it, you will get there eventually.
All the best
Thank you (sorry for the late reply). I heard you used seneca and i've currently got 50 hours on it lol. How many hours did you accumulate during GCSE?
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pizzapancakes26
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(Original post by alwinjm)
Thank you (sorry for the late reply). I heard you used seneca and i've currently got 50 hours on it lol. How many hours did you accumulate during GCSE?
In all honesty I only ended up getting around 30 or so because I only used it to touch up on my knowledge rather than revise solidly. Different things work differently for everyone
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halsx11
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Same 😁 I just use it to consolidate and it helps me understand it visually
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