I got all 9s in GCSE-here's how Watch

aliceaquaspirit
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#81
Report 1 week ago
#81
(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Our history teacher set flashcards for homework so everyone was literally forced to do them. They worked really well for me either way. The main advice I would give to you is don't try to remember everything because you don't need to. Make sure you have a rough idea of key events, e.g what happened in the Cuban Missile Crisis, and then for each key event, I used flashcards and acronyms/ mnemonics to remember key dates, names and places, e.g for the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962, where a nuclear war almost came true. - it rhymed and I still to this day remember it.
Remember, most of your marks come from explanations rather than evidence
thanks!! would you say I could still get a top grade if I just revise causes and consequences? I'm predicted a 9 but honestly I don't think it's going to happen because there's just so much content
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
pizzapancakes26
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#82
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#82
(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
thanks!! would you say I could still get a top grade if I just revise causes and consequences? I'm predicted a 9 but honestly I don't think it's going to happen because there's just so much content
That is actually an amazing way to revise- of course you can get a top grade. In fact, causes and consequences is what most questions ask for so you are going in the right direction.
0
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#83
Report 1 week ago
#83
@floralprints Yeah we can do it (and do any others who are doing GCSEs this year) Idk but I’ve always found maths so confusing from the start but now I’m just learning and applying! What do you do for maths revision except from past papers/questions
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
FloralPrints
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#84
Report 1 week ago
#84
(Original post by halsx11)
@floralprints Yeah we can do it (and do any others who are doing GCSEs this year) Idk but I’ve always found maths so confusing from the start but now I’m just learning and applying! What do you do for maths revision except from past papers/questions
now i go through lists XD
pretty much practice papers and questions because that works for me
0
reply
FloralPrints
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#85
Report 1 week ago
#85
(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Hey there,
Our school bought a program called MathsWatch which was very useful, and this site had checklists which most of the class printed and used. I don't have access to it anymore, but if you have a maths textbook or workbook, which I'm assuming you do, going through the contents page may be a good idea to ensure you have covered the main topics
our school has mathswatch but i never knew it had a listttt!?! thank youuu (why doesnt my school tell us anything smh)
0
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#86
Report 1 week ago
#86
(Original post by FloralPrints)
now i go through lists XD
pretty much practice papers and questions because that works for me
Okay so have you finished all your topics to Grade 9 my school is so slow but we will have covered it by the end of February!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
FloralPrints
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#87
Report 1 week ago
#87
(Original post by halsx11)
Okay so have you finished all your topics to Grade 9 my school is so slow but we will have covered it by the end of February!
we started the course in year 9 and once we finished we just went over it again and again so i guess you can say we've finished! now we're just going over topics lol
0
reply
pizzapancakes26
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#88
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#88
(Original post by L36)
Thanks for making this thread! Do you have any tips for French listening, speaking and writing? Also what textbook did you use for French?
Our school let us take old spec Expo textbooks home and we used the Studio ones in class.
0
reply
Conniestitution
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#89
Report 1 week ago
#89
Hi, I got 8 A* equivalent grades, a 7 and a 6, so I feel qualified to help here. (five 9s, a Distinction*, two 8s, one 7, one 6)
I did not revise the year before at all. I used the mistakes I naturally made in exams and learned from them. If I was getting low grades I looked up tips and improved with them (went from a 5 to a 9 in English Language over the course of y11!) but other than that I just worked hard in school and relaxed at home.

I would definitely recommend reading through your revision guides and making notes if you need the information to stay in your head. (This applies mostly to your options, humanities and sciences.) For my language, I just practised the speaking as much as I could (honestly, the only truly hard work I put in was this and I'm really proud of my 7 in French because I was afraid I'd scrape a 4). For science, Primrose Kitten and FreeScienceLessons on youtube were my best friends.

Long story short, you CAN get 9s if you start revising in May. Don't panic! I would obviously recommend you keep up with all of your topics, but if you can do that in school then I don't see the necessity of working for hours afterwards.

***If anyone wants some tips and tricks to improve English Language, send me a message. I've got a massive paragraph I wrote during and after my exams that saved my life - I never seemed to get good grades in my language exams even though I had always done well before GCSEs and had good vocab, structure and grammar skills, so I looked up videos and other people's advice to compile a list of what appeals to examiners.
1
reply
TrulyBless
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#90
Report 1 week ago
#90
This was really helpful and great job on your GCSEs. I forward it to my daughter who is just in year 9 going into year 10 September. I am sure you would go great in your A-levels.

(Original post by pizzapancakes26)To start off, by no means do I want this to be a bragging post or acclamation of how 'smart' I am, I have received several PMs and have decided to make a post about how I actually did it- how I got a clean sweep of 9s in GCSE.
You may not believe me and that is fair enough, but hopefully you'll at least acknowledge some of the stuff I advise anyway.
Background: I did the following at GCSE-
English literature (AQA), English language(AQA), Maths(Edexcel) Religious Studies (Eduqas), French (AQA) History (Edexcel) Triple science (AQA) and Polish (AQA). I'm currently in Year 12 doing 3 A Levels: Chemistry, Biology and English Literature.
I want to study medicine or something healthcare/science related in the future so if you have any questions about that, do PM me.

The main piece of advice I would give is start early. Whilst for Year 11s the time is nearing at a scarily fast pace, Year 10s, I would urge you to start at least some sort of proper revision around Christmas time when you get to Year 11, of course revising throughout Year 10 as well.
Year 11- you should be consistently and regularly revising at this point. January is basically over and February half term will come around in no time where you really should place a lot of focus on getting some good quality studying done. During the exams and in between them, I did very minimal revision, as I had covered all my content and revision earlier in the year.

What I did: I revised throughout the school year each night- not hardcore by any means, but doing something-a set of practice questions, mindmaps, flashcards, and in this way I gradually built up a bank of good resources. I started revising more solidly at Christmas time and by Easter, I was putting in a lot of hours- Easter is really, your final chance to really give it that big push.

Techniques: First, find out what kind of learner you are. I am a visual learner, hence my techniques make sense: I made loads of flash cards. Loads. They worked particularly well for science because they ensured I knew all the content. I have attached the link to my quizlet cards: https://quizlet.com/FrenchFries26 Just go on the GCSE folders and I have plenty of flashcards with key info, model answers, etc.
Practice questions and papers. Our year group was the first to do all the new GCSEs so past papers were becoming less useful but here's the thing- examiners can't really come up with new questions, so they reuse and recycle old ones- therefore the more you practice questions, the more familiar you will be. I used physics and maths tutor: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/ and still swear by it for A Level.

Maths is similar to the sciences: you can't really revise it, you have to practice it.
Essay subjects: You need to plan essays. For English, plan essays for each of the themes and characters, and then write the essays in timed conditions, hand them in to your teacher to mark, and repeat. Act upon the feedback they give you, because it is vital. Once you plan as many essays as you can, you will virtually be fully prepared. The essay which came up for me in the Shakespeare section was one I planned a while back, so all I did was I rewrote the essay from as much memory as I could, obviously changing up some parts which my teacher earlier marked a 9.
For history, you will need to know content extremely well, however most of your marks are based not on evidence, but on explanations, and so making sure you use convincing language and are not just describing will ensure you let the examiner you know what you're talking about. Practice questions.

Languages: I have a natural knack for languages, so French did not prove to be too much of a challenge for me- I saw a word, I remembered it. However what I did do, was I spent a lot of break times with my teacher practising for the spoken exam to ensure pronunciation was on point, and I consistently learned vocab, writing pieces using the words I had revised.

Exam technique is important. You need to play the examiner's game. Once you've seen all the evolution and series circuit questions there are, and planned all the essays, there is nothing that can surprise you- and you will do well.

Plan: I personally prefer todo lists rather than timetables for revision because I don't like a strict time scale, but if timetables motivate you more, use them to plan your study.

Your health, however, is also very important. Do not neglect your wellbeing for your grades, because both end up going downhill if you do.

If you have any more questions, PM me and I'll be happy to answer.

Good luck!
1
reply
aliceaquaspirit
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#91
Report 1 week ago
#91
(Original post by Conniestitution)
Hi, I got 8 A* equivalent grades, a 7 and a 6, so I feel qualified to help here. (five 9s, a Distinction*, two 8s, one 7, one 6)
I did not revise the year before at all. I used the mistakes I naturally made in exams and learned from them. If I was getting low grades I looked up tips and improved with them (went from a 5 to a 9 in English Language over the course of y11!) but other than that I just worked hard in school and relaxed at home.

I would definitely recommend reading through your revision guides and making notes if you need the information to stay in your head. (This applies mostly to your options, humanities and sciences.) For my language, I just practised the speaking as much as I could (honestly, the only truly hard work I put in was this and I'm really proud of my 7 in French because I was afraid I'd scrape a 4). For science, Primrose Kitten and FreeScienceLessons on youtube were my best friends.

Long story short, you CAN get 9s if you start revising in May. Don't panic! I would obviously recommend you keep up with all of your topics, but if you can do that in school then I don't see the necessity of working for hours afterwards.

***If anyone wants some tips and tricks to improve English Language, send me a message. I've got a massive paragraph I wrote during and after my exams that saved my life - I never seemed to get good grades in my language exams even though I had always done well before GCSEs and had good vocab, structure and grammar skills, so I looked up videos and other people's advice to compile a list of what appeals to examiners.
can you help me out with English language??
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
pizzapancakes26
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#92
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#92
(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
can you help me out with English language??
Hey,
English language is hard to 'revise' for. Some people say you can't revise for it at all, but I disagree- rather than revising, you are just preparing.
The main hardest part is that you don't know what extract will come up in your real exam. This means that you need to be good at several things before your real exam: picking out techniques fast, and identifying them correctly. It will look bad if you call a metaphor a simile, or a noun a verb- so make sure you have polished up on these simple things, otherwise your analysis may not fit.
I would suggest you find time to read books rich with imagery- '1984', and the 'Picture of Dorian Gray' by George Orwell, 'Rebecca' by Daphne Du Maurier are good ones I would recommend. Read them and pick out the techniques and even say out loud what general effect they have- if it's a metaphor, don't just say it's one, tell the examiner what it does. Does it increase tension? Does it add a sensory perspective which allows the reader to almost feel what is going on? Does it create a particular tone? What kind? You get the point.
Not only language and imagery, make sure you know how to pick out structure techinques. This is harder, but includes things such as narrative, perspective, linear and non linear narrative, order of events, motifs, etc. Also say what this does. Eg. The first person narrator gives a focused persepctive of the story which allows the reader to understand the internal thoughts of the character.
The key thing I will stress is that in AQA, the last describe/ narrate questions in Paper 1 and the writing to argue question in Paper 2 is worth half the paper, so it makes sense that you put a lot of effort and time into it.
What I did was I found pictures online- a beach, a sunset, a forest, a desert, a shopping centre, a haunted house, and I wrote descriptive pieces about them or wrote stories with as many techniques as I could- this will prepare you so well for whatever picture/ question does come up. For Paper 2, write formal letters, articles, speeches about random issues you pick- should homework be allowed? should under 18s be allowed to vote? Should animal testing be banned? This will also give you good phrases and formats to use.
Good luck
0
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#93
Report 1 week ago
#93
(Original post by FloralPrints)
we started the course in year 9 and once we finished we just went over it again and again so i guess you can say we've finished! now we're just going over topics lol
Oh okay my school is so slow we started in Year 10! And still haven’t gone through all the topics 🤦🏻*♀️ My teacher decided to leave last half term and till then I’ve got a new teacher and all she says is I want you to all get 7s! It’s so annoying cuz I have to revise all the topics at home!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#94
Report 1 week ago
#94
(Original post by Conniestitution)
Hi, I got 8 A* equivalent grades, a 7 and a 6, so I feel qualified to help here. (five 9s, a Distinction*, two 8s, one 7, one 6)
I did not revise the year before at all. I used the mistakes I naturally made in exams and learned from them. If I was getting low grades I looked up tips and improved with them (went from a 5 to a 9 in English Language over the course of y11!) but other than that I just worked hard in school and relaxed at home.

I would definitely recommend reading through your revision guides and making notes if you need the information to stay in your head. (This applies mostly to your options, humanities and sciences.) For my language, I just practised the speaking as much as I could (honestly, the only truly hard work I put in was this and I'm really proud of my 7 in French because I was afraid I'd scrape a 4). For science, Primrose Kitten and FreeScienceLessons on youtube were my best friends.

Long story short, you CAN get 9s if you start revising in May. Don't panic! I would obviously recommend you keep up with all of your topics, but if you can do that in school then I don't see the necessity of working for hours afterwards.

***If anyone wants some tips and tricks to improve English Language, send me a message. I've got a massive paragraph I wrote during and after my exams that saved my life - I never seemed to get good grades in my language exams even though I had always done well before GCSEs and had good vocab, structure and grammar skills, so I looked up videos and other people's advice to compile a list of what appeals to examiners.
I got a 6 in English Language and really want a 8 at the end of year 11! Any tips in what you did 🤗 it would really help!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#95
Report 1 week ago
#95
(Original post by pizzapancakes26)
Hey,
English language is hard to 'revise' for. Some people say you can't revise for it at all, but I disagree- rather than revising, you are just preparing.
The main hardest part is that you don't know what extract will come up in your real exam. This means that you need to be good at several things before your real exam: picking out techniques fast, and identifying them correctly. It will look bad if you call a metaphor a simile, or a noun a verb- so make sure you have polished up on these simple things, otherwise your analysis may not fit.
I would suggest you find time to read books rich with imagery- '1984', and the 'Picture of Dorian Gray' by George Orwell, 'Rebecca' by Daphne Du Maurier are good ones I would recommend. Read them and pick out the techniques and even say out loud what general effect they have- if it's a metaphor, don't just say it's one, tell the examiner what it does. Does it increase tension? Does it add a sensory perspective which allows the reader to almost feel what is going on? Does it create a particular tone? What kind? You get the point.
Not only language and imagery, make sure you know how to pick out structure techinques. This is harder, but includes things such as narrative, perspective, linear and non linear narrative, order of events, motifs, etc. Also say what this does. Eg. The first person narrator gives a focused persepctive of the story which allows the reader to understand the internal thoughts of the character.
The key thing I will stress is that in AQA, the last describe/ narrate questions in Paper 1 and the writing to argue question in Paper 2 is worth half the paper, so it makes sense that you put a lot of effort and time into it.
What I did was I found pictures online- a beach, a sunset, a forest, a desert, a shopping centre, a haunted house, and I wrote descriptive pieces about them or wrote stories with as many techniques as I could- this will prepare you so well for whatever picture/ question does come up. For Paper 2, write formal letters, articles, speeches about random issues you pick- should homework be allowed? should under 18s be allowed to vote? Should animal testing be banned? This will also give you good phrases and formats to use.
Good luck
Yeah that’s what I do but I really want to improve in my mocks in 2 weeks!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
s.m999
Badges: 14
#96
Report 1 week ago
#96
what grades did you get in your christmas/ january year 11 mocks?
reply
halsx11
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#97
Report 1 week ago
#97
(Original post by s.m999)
what grades did you get in your christmas/ january year 11 mocks?
I got 6/7s in all my subjects! But I really want to get 8/9s! Wbu
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
A level RPP
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#98
Report 1 week ago
#98
(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
thanks!! would you say I could still get a top grade if I just revise causes and consequences? I'm predicted a 9 but honestly I don't think it's going to happen because there's just so much content
What is history like...I regret not taking it...I Am in year 12
0
reply
pizzapancakes26
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#99
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#99
(Original post by s.m999)
what grades did you get in your christmas/ january year 11 mocks?
A mix- mostly 8s and a few 7s and 9s
0
reply
1102ha11
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#100
Report 1 week ago
#100
(Original post by Conniestitution)
Hi, I got 8 A* equivalent grades, a 7 and a 6, so I feel qualified to help here. (five 9s, a Distinction*, two 8s, one 7, one 6)
I did not revise the year before at all. I used the mistakes I naturally made in exams and learned from them. If I was getting low grades I looked up tips and improved with them (went from a 5 to a 9 in English Language over the course of y11!) but other than that I just worked hard in school and relaxed at home.

I would definitely recommend reading through your revision guides and making notes if you need the information to stay in your head. (This applies mostly to your options, humanities and sciences.) For my language, I just practised the speaking as much as I could (honestly, the only truly hard work I put in was this and I'm really proud of my 7 in French because I was afraid I'd scrape a 4). For science, Primrose Kitten and FreeScienceLessons on youtube were my best friends.

Long story short, you CAN get 9s if you start revising in May. Don't panic! I would obviously recommend you keep up with all of your topics, but if you can do that in school then I don't see the necessity of working for hours afterwards.

***If anyone wants some tips and tricks to improve English Language, send me a message. I've got a massive paragraph I wrote during and after my exams that saved my life - I never seemed to get good grades in my language exams even though I had always done well before GCSEs and had good vocab, structure and grammar skills, so I looked up videos and other people's advice to compile a list of what appeals to examiners.
Hi I would like to improve English Lang I don’t know how to pm tho x
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bath
    Undergraduate Virtual Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Ravensbourne University London
    School of Design, School of Media Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Leeds Trinity University
    PGCE Open Day Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19

Do you have a food intolerance or allergy?

Yes - a food intolerance (81)
14.16%
Yes - a food allergy (60)
10.49%
Yes - an autoimmune disorder (i.e coeliac, colitis) (15)
2.62%
Yes - I have an intolerance and allergy (15)
2.62%
No (401)
70.1%

Watched Threads

View All