The things no-one tells you about life after uni... Watch

Burton Bridge
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#21
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#21
(Original post by ecolier)
That you actually have to repay the Student Loan
Keys kind of in the word mate, National curriculum keeping the people poor and stupid!
Last edited by Burton Bridge; 2 weeks ago
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Interrobang
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#22
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Apart from the obvious tax, pension etc. That you don't get taught at school/uni... for me, it's how different (And at times, difficult) to make friends post-uni. At uni, everyone is in the same situation, but when you go out into the world of work, everyone is different (how long they've lived in the area/moved there with people, have kids, whether they already have their own friends nearby etc)
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GingerJoe
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#23
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(Original post by Interrobang)
Apart from the obvious tax, pension etc. That you don't get taught at school/uni... for me, it's how different (And at times, difficult) to make friends post-uni. At uni, everyone is in the same situation, but when you go out into the world of work, everyone is different (how long they've lived in the area/moved there with people, have kids, whether they already have their own friends nearby etc)
That is a very good point, I've tried to always find big house shares so that I will at least get on with one of them. I have been very lucky with housemates, relationships on the other hand... not so much. Everybody in the adult world seems to be taken (cliche I know),or married or having kids.
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The Champion.m4a
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That you would feel like you're no longer improving yourself
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Ryuzaki_Light
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#25
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#25
(Original post by ecolier)
That you actually have to repay the Student Loan

That your degree is virtually the same as any other one (except career ones e.g Medicine / Vet / Dentistry)

That virtually everyone else has a degree, and getting a job with a "generic" degree is tough

That many people will probably continue studying Masters / PhD etc.
would you classify economics at a top 15 uni in the uk as a generic degree?
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Slowbro93
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#26
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Unemployment absolutely sucks
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quasa
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#27
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unless you have connections, the job market is an absolute pain in the ass.

Also working as a locum / freelancer / temp in pharmacy strips away your rights vs those who are employed / properly self-employed. Be prepared to travel long distances, work up to 16 hours a day without any lunch or toilet (or standard) breaks in an understaffed, poorly ventilated small room and spend most of the time multitasking numerous things in a chaotic / unorganised environment which has no structure.

racism/sexism/ageism / discrimination still exists in the workplace

Not everyone is willing to accept your help and will lie about you not providing them support due to the above / fear of you taking their job/ being horrible people.

some incidents which are considered funny by some people may be seen as very innappropriate in others.

be prepared for unexpected changes in funding (such as the government tripling tuition fees thereby making postgrad study unfeasible) and personal circumstances (and dont vent openly on social media as it will annoy people / portray you in a negative light).

Make sure you save money where you can as it can be useful in case of emergency (prime example, both parents being made redundant and helping pay of their mortgage).

It is extremely hard to make new friends and a lot of your friends from uni / school will lose contact with you.

just because you are genuinely interested in helping people / healthcare, doesnt mean others in your field are. a lot of health staff view their jobs as a source of income and nothing more/ couldnt care less about patients or improving the quality of care.

if your a locum, most staff dont give a crap about you and will ignore you. Being a locum in this day and age means being expendable. If you see any problems in the workplace or notice illegal/harmful conduct and report it to practice managers / tell people to correct their behaviour, it is the same as getting sacked / suspended without pay as there are 5-6 pharmacists for every job.

even if you are an apolitical person, be prepared to be caught in the crossfire known as workplace politics
Last edited by quasa; 1 week ago
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missat
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#28
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2:1 Law degree, done plenty of voluntary work at CAB etc, worked a few retail jobs, have Westlaw and Lexus Nexus certifications. Got scammed out of £900 from a fake trainee paralegal programme (Preston Holbrook).Graduated from University in June last year its February now and still looking for entry-level legal work.
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Morven777
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Iloveowls123)
How hard it has been to get a good job - despite my degree, internships, paid and unpaid work experience, extra study and extracurriculars... Anyone else found this?

Also how frustrating it is not to be able to use student discounts anymore
...and every year, a hundred thousand new graduates join the morass, all clutching degrees and going for the same "jobs"....OMG..
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Morven777
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#30
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Good points from Quasa here,....also you have to remember that every part of your social media will be examined by interviewers - what was amusing at Uni isn't necessarily amusing to an interview panel, or the papersifters before one even get's a chance of an interview.....ouch...


(Original post by quasa)unless you have connections, the job market is an absolute pain in the ass.

Also working as a locum / freelancer / temp in pharmacy strips away your rights vs those who are employed / properly self-employed. Be prepared to travel long distances, work up to 16 hours a day without any lunch or toilet (or standard) breaks in an understaffed, poorly ventilated small room and spend most of the time multitasking numerous things in a chaotic / unorganised environment which has no structure.

racism/sexism/ageism / discrimination still exists in the workplace

Not everyone is willing to accept your help and will lie about you not providing them support due to the above / fear of you taking their job/ being horrible people.

some incidents which are considered funny by some people may be seen as very innappropriate in others.

be prepared for unexpected changes in funding (such as the government tripling tuition fees thereby making postgrad study unfeasible) and personal circumstances (and dont vent openly on social media as it will annoy people / portray you in a negative light).

Make sure you save money where you can as it can be useful in case of emergency (prime example, both parents being made redundant and helping pay of their mortgage).

It is extremely hard to make new friends and a lot of your friends from uni / school will lose contact with you.

just because you are genuinely interesting in helping people / healthcare, doesnt mean others in your field are. a lot of health staff view their jobs as a source of income and nothing more.

if your a locum, most staff dont give a crap about you and will ignore you. Being a locum in this day and age means being expendable. If you see any problems in the workplace or notice illegal/harmful conduct and report it to practice managers / tell people to correct their behaviour, it is the same as getting sacked / suspended without pay as there are 5-6 pharmacists for every job.

even if you are an apolitical person, be prepared to be caught in the crossfire known as workplace politics
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quasa
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#31
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(Original post by Morven777)
Good points from Quasa here,....also you have to remember that every part of your social media will be examined by interviewers - what was amusing at Uni isn't necessarily amusing to an interview panel, or the papersifters before one even get's a chance of an interview.....ouch...


(Original post by quasa)unless you have connections, the job market is an absolute pain in the ass.

Also working as a locum / freelancer / temp in pharmacy strips away your rights vs those who are employed / properly self-employed. Be prepared to travel long distances, work up to 16 hours a day without any lunch or toilet (or standard) breaks in an understaffed, poorly ventilated small room and spend most of the time multitasking numerous things in a chaotic / unorganised environment which has no structure.

racism/sexism/ageism / discrimination still exists in the workplace

Not everyone is willing to accept your help and will lie about you not providing them support due to the above / fear of you taking their job/ being horrible people.

some incidents which are considered funny by some people may be seen as very innappropriate in others.

be prepared for unexpected changes in funding (such as the government tripling tuition fees thereby making postgrad study unfeasible) and personal circumstances (and dont vent openly on social media as it will annoy people / portray you in a negative light).

Make sure you save money where you can as it can be useful in case of emergency (prime example, both parents being made redundant and helping pay of their mortgage).

It is extremely hard to make new friends and a lot of your friends from uni / school will lose contact with you.

just because you are genuinely interesting in helping people / healthcare, doesnt mean others in your field are. a lot of health staff view their jobs as a source of income and nothing more.

if your a locum, most staff dont give a crap about you and will ignore you. Being a locum in this day and age means being expendable. If you see any problems in the workplace or notice illegal/harmful conduct and report it to practice managers / tell people to correct their behaviour, it is the same as getting sacked / suspended without pay as there are 5-6 pharmacists for every job.

even if you are an apolitical person, be prepared to be caught in the crossfire known as workplace politics
whilst we're on the topic of social media - MAKE SURE YOUR LINKEDIN PROFILE IS UP TO DATE
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SJW-
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#32
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(Original post by Morven777)
...and every year, a hundred thousand new graduates join the morass, all clutching degrees and going for the same "jobs"....OMG..
grad unemployment its abit like money doesnt buy happiness. its probably true but ppl still wanna find out for themselves
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Burton Bridge
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#33
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(Original post by Morven777)
...and every year, a hundred thousand new graduates join the morass, all clutching degrees and going for the same "jobs"....OMG..
But they have lined the pockets of a demographic whom are being looked after by our governments and on the off chance they get their job guaranteed they won't benefit from their wage because of their debt via a reduction in their wage.

Welcome to the most successful and popular policy of modern day to keep the rich poor divide growing the 'right way' and increase the nation debt to give the government an excuse to clobber the needy (austerity) while gifting the borrowed money to non needy.
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Laurence010401
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#34
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#34
(Original post by ecolier)
That you actually have to repay the Student Loan
I haven’t even started uni and even I know that lol
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swelshie
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#35
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Thing that has surprised me the most apart from poor graduate engineering prospects is the fact that people still recommend it to young people as a career choice. That's despite success being about the same odds as guessing a coin toss.

Ditto to the comments regarding being surpassed in almost every aspect of life after wasting years studying skills that are not in demand.
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Last edited by swelshie; 1 week ago
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Burton Bridge
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#36
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(Original post by swelshie)
Thing that has surprised me the most apart from poor graduate engineering prospects is the fact that people still recommend it to young people as a career choice. That's despite success being about the same odds as guessing a coin toss.

Ditto to the comments regarding being surpassed in almost every aspect of life after wasting years studying skills that are not in demand.
I'm currently trying my best to explain this to my son, unfortunately the taxpayer funded brainwashing he is subjected too is currently winning
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Certainty
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#37
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That it is incredibly lonely and isolating

You are free to do whatever you wish

You have a lot of freedom
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Certainty
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#38
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That you will be discriminated against based on your name, religion, race
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DrSocSciences
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#39
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That when you manage to get that first job, it’s a shocker how few weeks of holiday you’re allowed.
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Certainty
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#40
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That university life is so easy
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