aarnat
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hi guys, so i have started a level history and have found to my surprise that the 9-1 exams had actually made the bridge between GCSE and A Level a lot smaller; obviously it is significantly more work and wider reading but not as awful as i was expecting.

My course is:
Paper 1: Russia - From Lenin to Yeltsin
Paper 2: China - Mao's China
Paper 3 British - Parliamentary Reform - idk much about this because we are going to do this in year 13.
Coursework - The Suffragettes.

I am just wondering what do i need to do to ensure I can achieve an a*, i have started to make revision materials on the notes i make in class to save time further down the road. any tips for revision techniques, especially using timelines as a revision method. i get given extra reading regularly, and do a lot of extra reading when planning for essays to broaden my understanding and strenghthen my arguments.
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.
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Tolgash
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What awarding body are you with, if I may ask? Also, what was your GCSE grade? You may already have the foundations for the A* historian skillset.
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uni20188
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I did history GCSE and A Level (Edexcel for both). I achieved an A* at GCSE. A level history truly f****d me up. I hated it. Managed to get a B. There’s sooooooooooo much content it’s unreal. Each topic has a different style/type of question so it can get a bit confusing, though not much, just make sure you know the different types of questions (whether you’ll be asked a source question or not for each specific topic). You basically have to know everything because the questions are sometimes specific about a certain part of the topic therefore you can’t afford to skip over a section. KEEP ON TOP OF IT, I DIDN’T AND I STRUGGLED. Also thank you’re lucky stars you aren’t doing the Stuart’s topic. China seems interesting.
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uni20188
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Make lots of essay plans. Practice writing essays in the time you’ll be given in the exam
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meganije
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A-level history is all about evaluating everything to get the best grades!
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EssayDoctor
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(Original post by aarnat)
hi guys, so i have started a level history and have found to my surprise that the 9-1 exams had actually made the bridge between GCSE and A Level a lot smaller; obviously it is significantly more work and wider reading but not as awful as i was expecting.

My course is:
Paper 1: Russia - From Lenin to Yeltsin
Paper 2: China - Mao's China
Paper 3 British - Parliamentary Reform - idk much about this because we are going to do this in year 13.
Coursework - The Suffragettes.

I am just wondering what do i need to do to ensure I can achieve an a*, i have started to make revision materials on the notes i make in class to save time further down the road. any tips for revision techniques, especially using timelines as a revision method. i get given extra reading regularly, and do a lot of extra reading when planning for essays to broaden my understanding and strenghthen my arguments.
Posted this earlier, but certainly applies. Hope it's useful. Feel free to ask follow up Qs.
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5798682
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