h26
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During an adiabatic compression of an ideal (perfect) gas, its temperature:

a) increases d)decreases c)remains constant d)decreases and then increases e)increases and then decreases


Help me please! :/
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h26
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username3442196
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adiabatic means (IIRC) it's quick so no energy enters or leaves, so the temp would have to rise ...
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h26
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(Original post by old_teach)
adiabatic means (IIRC) it's quick so no energy enters or leaves, so the temp would have to rise ...
Thank you so much again!
So..from what I know so far: - i might be wrong though
when the thermodynamic system is isothermic, the temperature of gas is constant.
when the thermodynamic system is isobaric, the pressure of gas is constant.
when the thermodynamic system is adiabatic, teh entropy is constant.
when the thermodynamic system is isochoric, the volume of the system is constant.

I am trying to make a link with what you kindly mentioned but am not quite sure.
Could you please kindly let me know your thoughts whever possible for you?
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username3442196
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I've not heard of isochoric!
All this stuff is from far back in my memory, I agree with your first two, I had adiabatic as dQ = 0, (I think dS =0 if it's reversible - but please don't ask for explanations!)
If you compress a gas quickly, don't have time for heat energy to leave, then you'll raise the internal energy (& therefore temp).
Sorry, I never was a fan of thermodynaics ...
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h26
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(Original post by old_teach)
I've not heard of isochoric!
All this stuff is from far back in my memory, I agree with your first two, I had adiabatic as dQ = 0, (I think dS =0 if it's reversible - but please don't ask for explanations!)
If you compress a gas quickly, don't have time for heat energy to leave, then you'll raise the internal energy (& therefore temp).
Sorry, I never was a fan of thermodynaics ...
Hi, no worries at all! And thanks! I think this is actually more chemistry haha so I posted in wrong forum
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