Norway tells students to avoid UK universities Watch

Doonesbury
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(Original post by angelinahx)
I applied for deferred entry, hence the uncertainty.
But that's irrelevant. I applied to Melbourne as well and obviously will get no funding and that's okay because I have funding from my own country to finance my studies (yes, in Sweden you get paid to study abroad). I'm leaving because I don't want to personally experience the economic aftermath of Brexit and I'd rather contribute to a country where I feel welcome, which is the same reason my dentist friend is leaving.
Understood and that's sad.
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CupDispenser
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There is too much appeal for foreign students to study in the UK. I doubt Brexit will have too much impact.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by CupDispenser)
There is too much appeal for foreign students to study in the UK. I doubt Brexit will have too much impact.
What is that huge appeal? To study in English - yes - but other countries can offer that. Because UK universities excel at gaming league tables - maybe.
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ladyread
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This is so symptomatic of the Euro feeling towards Brexit thought, as well as worries about food and medication supply. I would pay Overseas fees (which are enormous) but use my EU passport to get in, so my visa would be cheap / free - Brexit would kill that for dual national students who cough up insane amounts to stay.

I wouldn't be susprised if the underlying fear for a lot of Norwegians and other members of the EU and EEA is the increase iin Visa costs, fears of lack of food and medication, as well as the growing anti-foreigner feelings. The Higher Ed sector was always going to suffer.
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by 04MR17)
I think the only silly thing is believing that ranking of a university is that important.

I think telling the European Union that we don't like their company isn't the best message to the citizens of those countries about how welcoming we'll be to them in our universities.
I'm sure these universities will continue to attract students from abroad, maybe some new funding arrangements need to be put into place. Why does the UK attract large numbers of international students in the first place? It's the quality of the universities, not membership of the EU.

It's a completely empty threat from Norway, but if Norwegians don't want to come here then that's fine too.
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Doonesbury
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(Original post by jameswhughes)
Why does the UK attract large numbers of international students in the first place? It's the quality of the universities, not membership of the EU.

It's a completely empty threat from Norway, but if Norwegians don't want to come here then that's fine too.
Well membership of the EU is certainly a significant factor. Guaranteed student loans AND reduced fees in the first place make it an attractive destination.

Only wealthy internationals (or the very fortunate few to get substantial scholarships) can afford full international fees, typically double the home fees.
Last edited by Doonesbury; 2 weeks ago
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LaTruite
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
But...





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(Original post by Doonesbury)
It's in the EEA and its citizens qualify for SFE student loans same as EU citizens.

In a no deal Brexit they may not...
Norwegians actually have to pay international tuition fees, we are not considered EU students just because we're in the EEA. Also, we can afford the international fees. That's not the issue here.
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Doonesbury
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(Original post by LaTruite)
Norwegians actually have to pay international tuition fees, we are not considered EU students just because we're in the EEA. Also, we can afford the international fees. That's not the issue here.
That's not what, for example, Westminster says.
https://www.westminster.ac.uk/study/...swiss-students

UK, EU and EEA students are treated as Home for fees purposes.


Edit: LaTruite is correct. :yep:
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Last edited by Doonesbury; 2 weeks ago
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ladyread
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(Original post by LaTruite)
Norwegians actually have to pay international tuition fees, we are not considered EU students just because we're in the EEA. Also, we can afford the international fees. That's not the issue here.
It seems to change across inst., at Ox Norwegians don't - http://www.ox.ac.uk/students/fees-funding/fees/status
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hazar.1
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Surely the first of many such announcements to come across the world. The Norwegian government is advising its students not to apply to UK universities because of Brexit.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics...brexit-warning

Postgrad applications from the EU are down 9% this year. This represents a major blow to UK university funding and cuts are now pretty much inevitable - it is also extremely likely that some universities in severe debt will go bust.

Another success for the Brexiteers.
the UK is a single independent woman! Let us be!
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LaTruite
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
That's not what, for example, Westminster says.
https://www.westminster.ac.uk/study/...swiss-students

UK, EU and EEA students are treated as Home for fees purposes.
That's not correct.

"You can qualify if you are an EU national and have been resident in the either the UK, EEA, Switzerland or overseas territories for the three consecutive years, or more, immediately before the first day of the first academic year of your course.
If you are a national of Norway, Iceland, Lichtenstein or Switzerland, you may also be eligible for the home rate of tuition fee if you:
- have been resident in the EEA or Switzerland or overseas territories for at least the three consecutive years immediately before the first day of the first academic year of your course and,
- are a resident in the UK and working in the UK (as a migrant worker) by this date and,
- you continue to work in the UK during your course."

If I were a migrant worker and lived in the UK for several years before going to uni I could have qualified, but most overseas students like me move straight from our country to the UK to study, so we're still considered international students for fee purposes.
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999tigger
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(Original post by jameswhughes)
I'm sure these universities will continue to attract students from abroad, maybe some new funding arrangements need to be put into place. Why does the UK attract large numbers of international students in the first place? It's the quality of the universities, not membership of the EU.

It's a completely empty threat from Norway, but if Norwegians don't want to come here then that's fine too.
What is the empty threat/ threat by Norway?
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LaTruite
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(Original post by ladyread)
It seems to change across inst., at Ox Norwegians don't - http://www.ox.ac.uk/students/fees-funding/fees/status
"Generally speaking, if you are a UK or EU national and you have lived all of your life in the EEA or Switzerland, you will pay fees at either the Home/EU (standard) or Home/EU (ELQ) fee rate."

Westminster and every other uni say the same thing, unfortunately. Norwegians aren't EU nationals, so we can't get a Home/EU fee status even though we live in the EEA.
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999tigger
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(Original post by LaTruite)
"Generally speaking, if you are a UK or EU national and you have lived all of your life in the EEA or Switzerland, you will pay fees at either the Home/EU (standard) or Home/EU (ELQ) fee rate."

Westminster and every other uni say the same thing, unfortunately. Norwegians aren't EU nationals, so we can't get a Home/EU fee status even though we live in the EEA.
Having had a look and obviously as you must have experienced then this appears to be correct. As you say from my reading the EEA membership benefits EU citizens only as an extended zone in which they can reside.

On this thread though you can still apply for Erasmus for 2019 and funding is guaranteed by the UK government, which the Norwegian minister was ignorant of. and thus relying on facts which were true. hence her advice was ill informed and just plain wrong. Its a shame if someone drops their Erasmus year when they had no need to.
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Doonesbury
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(Original post by LaTruite)
That's not correct.

"You can qualify if you are an EU national and have been resident in the either the UK, EEA, Switzerland or overseas territories for the three consecutive years, or more, immediately before the first day of the first academic year of your course.
If you are a national of Norway, Iceland, Lichtenstein or Switzerland, you may also be eligible for the home rate of tuition fee if you:
- have been resident in the EEA or Switzerland or overseas territories for at least the three consecutive years immediately before the first day of the first academic year of your course and,
- are a resident in the UK and working in the UK (as a migrant worker) by this date and,
- you continue to work in the UK during your course."

If I were a migrant worker and lived in the UK for several years before going to uni I could have qualified, but most overseas students like me move straight from our country to the UK to study, so we're still considered international students for fee purposes.
I stand (... sit ...) corrected. I'll amend my prior comments accordingly.

Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Every day is a school day

Edit: This probably also explains why the number of Norwegian undergrad full-time students in the UK is actually pretty low.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
I stand (... sit ...) corrected. I'll amend my prior comments accordingly.

Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Every day is a school day

Edit: This probably also explains why the number of Norwegian undergrad full-time students in the UK is actually pretty low.
I found its a surprise Norway is in this situation. I expect we will make a bilateral agreement with them after brexit. I am all for more Scandinavians coming to the UK to study.
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BlueIndigoViolet
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Perhaps they've woken up to the real state of UK universties.
An indicator of how desperate universities are to keep this gravy train rolling is in 2012 they made about 2,500 unconditional offers.
Last year they made over 60,000.
It's a house of cards they will do anything to prop up.
51% of students get to uni with 3x D's at A level.
Leeds Met ran over 90 courses where you could get in with 2 E"s at A level
only the mickey mouse degrees lol - degrees are becoming a rite of passage not an informed decision, we dont need textiles and theatre art degrees....
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Quixote.
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(Original post by BlueIndigoViolet)
only the mickey mouse degrees lol - degrees are becoming a rite of passage not an informed decision, we dont need textiles and theatre art degrees....
The UK isn't a special case, it's the same in almost every country in the world. Including those where people don't receive funding for their entire degree. Our education system is still one of the best in the world. Brexit will only have a negative effect on that. It might not be too damaging, we can't really say, but nothing positive will come from it. There will almost certainly be less money coming in, less students, less funding and grants for research.

It's incredibly narrow-minded to see the closure of universities, loss of jobs, loss of research, and loss of money flowing into certain areas of the country as anything but bad.

Also, FYI - plenty of top courses at RG universities have been in clearing in recent years.
Last edited by Quixote.; 2 weeks ago
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Doonesbury
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This may be a bigger problem than just Norway, a no deal Brexit may affect UK Erasmus students too:

Student exchanges in no-deal Brexit threat
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-47131426


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Other_Owl
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(Original post by Andrew97)
Norway isn’t even in the EU itself 😂😂😂😂😂
It is part of the EU's Freedom of Movement.
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