CryinglawUK
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Anyone know any good books or sites I could use for this question?
'Acts of Parliament, rather than constitutional conventions, are the most important source of the UK constitution’.
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username3689312
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google...................
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CryinglawUK
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shockingly enough I’ve tried google, everything was either no help or cost. Just thought I’d come on here for some help, not sarcastic comments!
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
shockingly enough I’ve tried google, everything was either no help or cost. Just thought I’d come on here for some help, not sarcastic comments!
You would be surprised at how many people post questions on here seeking basic information which a simple search would have discovered.
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CryinglawUK
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
You would be surprised at how many people post questions on here seeking basic information which a simple search would have discovered.
I asked for book and website recommendations that others have found good, not a search engine. I’d rather get resources I know others have found useful, than just google and pray something good comes up (which it didn’t). That’s fair enough, however I don’t see why James had to be so sarcastic.
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CryinglawUK
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Oh someone actually helpful 😂 it’s for uni! We have a core textbook but our tutor wrote it meaning that it’s not actually helpful but he gets money if we buy it 😂
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Notoriety
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
I asked for book and website recommendations that others have found good, not a search engine. I’d rather get resources I know others have found useful, than just google and pray something good comes up (which it didn’t). That’s fair enough, however I don’t see why James had to be so sarcastic.
I found my English Legal System by Slapper and Kelly (what a name) useful. I.e. the text my uni recommended. So it raises the question what resources do you have and what are they lacking. (Actually, it was Public Law by Elliot and Thomas.)

It is a rather basic question Wikipedia could help you answer, tbh.
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Mike. T
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You will hardly find any book useful enough to write a convincing essay for that topic.You really have to argue it out by using your understanding of UK acts, statutes and laws.Bear in mind that there is no constitution in the UK, only acts of parliament.Your best best perhaps is to find previously written reviews and essays on similar subjects. If you need help, I can send you some useful past essays I have written on similar subjects when I did my master's some years back.
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CryinglawUK
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Ohh thank you! I’ll definety take a look! I have loomed on Wikipedia which has helped I just need something to use as a more ‘reliable’ source if that make sense, tutors have an unknown hate for wiki (and lawteacher?)
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CryinglawUK
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Isn’t it just! Didn’t even give us discount 🙃 urgh you’re amazing! Thank you!! Aha I find it so funny when he quotes himself!
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CryinglawUK
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(Original post by Mike. T)
You will hardly find any book useful enough to write a convincing essay for that topic.You really have to argue it out by using your understanding of UK acts, statutes and laws.Bear in mind that there is no constitution in the UK, only acts of parliament.Your best best perhaps is to find previously written reviews and essays on similar subjects. If you need help, I can send you some useful past essays I have written on similar subjects when I did my master's some years back.
Ohh thank you! I think that’s where I’m struggling, the constitutional conventions part! Would you mind as it’d be a great help! 😊
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Mike. T
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
Ohh thank you! I think that’s where I’m struggling, the constitutional conventions part! Would you mind as it’d be a great help! 😊
I messaged you!
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Notoriety
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
Ohh thank you! I’ll definety take a look! I have loomed on Wikipedia which has helped I just need something to use as a more ‘reliable’ source if that make sense, tutors have an unknown hate for wiki (and lawteacher?)
Wikipedia gives you a background, the context. Then you look at the proper resources, e.g. your textbook (which can't be that bad and I suggest you give it another look) and the cases. You shouldn't be citing websites for basic topics like public law.

I would give an exception for new developments, e.g. a new case that is only discussed in blogs thus far (blogs of seminal academics!), but this isn't that new or niche. It's basic; textbooks will suffice.

Then, per Jaime LJ's insight, you can look at journal articles to find the forceful arguments which will support your analysis. Journal articles allow academics to say controversial things; they normally give you the basic mainstream info in textbooks.
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Notoriety
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Ours is also Elliot and Thomas, so don't be offended.

If Routledge or OUP have published a book, it's gonna be of decent quality. Questioning your academics' work is a bit of a waste of term; they're normally legit and you should be focussing on your own work.

Lastly, academics teach modules against their preferences. E.g. in company law, if you have an academic who was an insolvency expert in practice, they're gonna design the course so you do a bit more insolvency than you would under a non-insolvency academic. The rub is that the ordinary textbook wouldn't have as much insolvency as the module contains, so you're left a bit unsupported in some areas by the core textbook. When the academic teaching you the module wrote the book, it's tailored to the module and usually a huge benefit in my experience.
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CryinglawUK
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Wikipedia gives you a background, the context. Then you look at the proper resources, e.g. your textbook (which can't be that bad and I suggest you give it another look) and the cases. You shouldn't be citing websites for basic topics like public law.

I would give an exception for new developments, e.g. a new case that is only discussed in blogs thus far (blogs of seminal academics!), but this isn't that new or niche. It's basic; textbooks will suffice.

Then, per Jaime LJ's insight, you can look at journal articles to find the forceful arguments which will support your analysis. Journal articles allow academics to say controversial things; they normally give you the basic mainstream info in textbooks.
I know the basics, I went to my lecture. However I don't really want to reference the same book throughout my whole essay :/
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username3689312
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
I asked for book and website recommendations that others have found good, not a search engine. I’d rather get resources I know others have found useful, than just google and pray something good comes up (which it didn’t). That’s fair enough, however I don’t see why James had to be so sarcastic.
One google search of ''why are acts of parliament the most important source of law'' brings up mountains of results, hey it even brings up a completed essay.
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CryinglawUK
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(Original post by james_law)
One google search of ''why are acts of parliament the most important source of law'' brings up mountains of results, hey it even brings up a completed essay.
However that doesn't help me in the section ragrding constitutional conventions. I'd also rather more relaiable sources than random sites that Google brings up!
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CryinglawUK
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I'd rather have websites other people have used and found helpful in past exams than use a random website that came up on Google that could be total ********! However, I am extremly sorry as it has obviously bothered you so much
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username3689312
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It hasnt bothered me whatsoever, without hand feeding you everything, google brings up sites (yes you are correct in saying that are not credible) but if you go into one of the non crediable sites and read inbetween the lines (look at the cases/arguments used, you could form your own argument using cases/statutes etc). But thats too much work by the sounds of it.

Good Luck.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by CryinglawUK)
I know the basics, I went to my lecture. However I don't really want to reference the same book throughout my whole essay :/
When you read summit on Wikipedia, you don't quote Wikipedia. You quote the citation from Wikipedia (if it's reputable). When you read your textbook, which is giving a basic description of case law and principles, you don't need to quote your textbook. You can cite the cases and journal articles mentioned to support their description of the law. Most of your references will be coming from journal articles.
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