Grow your Grades revision tips competition Watch

DrawTheLine
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#21
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#21
If it helps you, listen to music. I focus really well listening to very loud classic rock. The beat motivates me and I can get hours of work done with a good playlist compared to very little if I work in silence.

Do practice questions or exam papers. They'll help you know what the examiner is looking for and help you develop exam technique. Get feedback on all the ones you do and reattempt them until you're getting the grades you want.

Make a timetable, checklist or schedule to help you stay on track. If you plan when you'll revise and what you'll focus on, you'll make sure you have enough time to work on everything you need to. There'll be no need for last minute cramming!
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HowToBeABlobfish
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#22
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#22
Don't get cocky. I got really cocky and ended up getting a D in my maths exam. I did the revision and everything but I didn't read the questions properly and ended up making really careless mistakes like saying +2 instead of -2
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Noodlzzz
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#23
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#23
For psychology:

do:
- revise key studies
- use flashcards or alternatives for fancy terminiology/brain regions etc.

don't:
- revise names (maybe a couple for each topic at most)
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Acsel
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#24
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#24
Find methods of revision that work for you
Different techniques work for different people. Your friend might be using flashcards whereas you need something more verbal. Don't worry about what techniques you're using, in many cases the sillier it is the easier it is to remember.

Don't try to revise everything with the same method
Different subjects require a different approach. Maths is a very practical subject so doing lots of papers and practice questions is ideal. But that alone won't work for English Literature where you need to be familiar with the material and must explore the concepts raised.

Focus on what matters
You don't have to do perfect in everything. Odds are there may be some parts of subjects you struggle with and others you find really easy. Focus on the subjects and topics that matter most. Don't neglect a subject, but if you're applying for a Maths degree it makes little sense to spend all your time focusing on your History A Level.

Don't compromise your life for grades
Ultimately your grades won't stay with you your entire life. A 9 or A* at the expense of your childhood isn't worth it. The soft skills you build in school and college are far more relevant. If you want to do well, you will need to put the work in, but don't spend all your time studying. Take breaks, see your friends, etc.

Work smarter, not harder
Don't simply throw more hours at the problem. If you are not seeing results, adjust the method. If spending 1 hour reading textbooks isn't working for you, spending 10 hours won't help much either
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Noodlzzz
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#25
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#25
Something my philosophy teacher taught me all those years ago: drink a lot of water/coffee/tea and push yourself to finish each chapter or essay plan etc. before peeing again
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thestudent33
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#26
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#26
For maths, the best thing you can do is practice, practice and... practice!

If you get a question wrong make sure you practice until you can't get it wrong again!
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Sinnoh
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#27
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#27
Don't waste time making your notes pretty. Just do questions. Learn why and how you mess up, because in doing that, you learn how not to get things wrong. Learn from yourself as well as from your textbook.
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SoulfulTwist
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#28
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#28
Simply, just start revising. The biggest hurdle to cross is to actually start it.

If you're running out of time, past papers, past papers and past papers.
If you have time, try to have a deeper understanding of the topics. But a little bit of everything is better than a deeper understanding of 1 or 2 topics for an exam.

Tone your life down if need be to revise but don't throw your life away. Balance is key.
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04MR17
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Andrew97)
Why am I quoted in this?
(Original post by thestudent33)
Same
You've probably posted in the Grow Your Grades forum at least once in the last x months.
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thestudent33
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#30
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(Original post by 04MR17)
You've probably posted in the Grow Your Grades forum at least once in the last x months.
Oh yh, probably
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amaraub
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#31
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#31
-videos
-notes
-flashcards (optional)
-past paper questions

rinse repeat
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Supernovas
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#32
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#32
If you're doing a writing based subject like English lit, make essay plans. No more reading over the books 24/7, use journals, critics, context and just plan, plan, plan. Use a different colour for each section of the plan and you'll be fine. Use those plans to address past questions too and just ensure your writing style is enough to hit the marks.

Also, those who do politics, history or any other fact based memory subject like I do, now is the time to devote learning hours to revising those subjects. Print off the spec and annotate each section with what you remember I'm relation to those units. Highlight what you remember and what you can't remember and go over the theory for what you can't remember. Any dates, names, statistics? Pick around 3 and make essay plans with the statistics incorporated. You don't need to know every single piece of hard data as some can be used for more than one question, but you need to know enough. Make a fact bank, write all the topics/questions the fact can fit under and you should be fine.

Hopefully you've cracked the writing style for each type of question, if not then literally ask. If anyone needs to know for politics I can help (Edexcel board), history? Not so much.
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Lemur14
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#33
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#33
For subjects like maths start with questions by topic, then mixed exercises then full papers That way you're starting with the simplest and working your way up to the real exam simulations :yep:

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TheTroll73
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#34
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#34
My tip:

Of you don;t do past papers, then no matter how good at teh subject you are, you're going to miss that grade you need!
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nyxnko_
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#35
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For A-level Maths and FM, I agree that practice is really the only thing you'll need :yes: It's getting used to the questions, knowing what to spot in order for you to answer the question, not panicking when you see an unfamiliar context and really, you can only do that with practice.
As for Chem and Physics, it's regular review of content and again, practising with past questions. For review, I usually just flick through my notes every night for a few weeks before the exam. I admit that I don't really prioritise this as I assume that I should know it, but it actually really helps, although I think that the practice is more important :dontknow:
Either way, we're all different people and different methods work for everyone. Just because something works for me doesn't meant that it will for you :nah:
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IDOZ
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#36
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#36
Start as early as possible, creating a weekly/fortnightly timetable, making sure you prioritise the subject areas you find the hardest to complete or understand
Don’t be afraid to ask your teachers
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Last edited by IDOZ; 1 week ago
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ToffeeJoy
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#37
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Try to use information from all the resources you've been given in order to complete your notes (and ultimately have all the info you need to revise) - this means use your class notes, your textbook, handouts, YouTube videos, diagrams... All that sort of stuff which you can use to create a 'bank' of information. It's a lot easier to revise when it's all in one place!
When you come to revising, find a method that works for you to actually understand what you're looking at - I've found it too easy to read and memorise facts without actually knowing how it all links together, meaning that ultimately I just forget it. For me, I've been working on fixing this by making mindmaps where I can visually see what parts of the topic are related. For you, it might be flashcards or revision videos that will make the topic 'click' in you brain.
If you don't undertand something, please ask someone! Whatever it is, it's not a stupid question if it's going to help you to do better (I've found one-to-one revision sessions really helpful).
Lastly, I would say that you shouldn't give up all your hobbies just to get extra revision time for your exams. We all need a break at some point, and if it's something you enjoy (if your experience is anything similar to mine) it will help you be less stressed overall!
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AestheticEnergy
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#38
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  • Something I like to do is this thing I call the '2-Hour-Brain-Dump'. After reading about a topic, take notes, read those notes aloud, then do some questions. Take a break from that subject completely; I'd take 1 or 2 hours. After that time, get a blank piece of paper and write down EVERYTHING about that topic. This helps with active recall, a key skill needed in exams. You force yourself to remember relevant information, and repetition is vital. Do it with varied breaks, like a few hours, then a day, then even a week.
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Last edited by AestheticEnergy; 6 days ago
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entertainmyfaith
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#39
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#39
quality > quantity always :yes:
don't be afraid to ask for help, that's what your teachers are for! pace yourself in your studying and vary your revision methods so recall, highlighting, videos, exam questions, exam papers etc... don't expect to get through the whole spec in one day- be reasonable, take regular breaks and make sure you're actually understanding the content.
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KimNoel
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#40
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#40
Mindmaps
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