Grow your Grades revision tips competition Watch

AthenaSphinx
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#61
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Targetting towards my way of learning through school:
1. Print off the specification and go through it, highlight if that works for you, add some colour for the things you dont know
2. Go through the things you forget repetatively from the actual textbook
3. On a flashcard, write down some of the things you forget so it is easier to access
4. Once going through most of the content, make sure you look at PAST PAPER! They are a gold mine! Go through the mark scheme and understand why you got the questions wrong, wrong. Learn the key words!

I learn through reading more than writing, so I make sure I read it many times so that the information get into my head.

Targetting towards my way of learning in uni:
1. Look at what I need to learn for the exam
2. Go through the topics one by one, read it once and skim, read is again taking more information in, third time critically read, look up on the internet
3. (If you are close with the upper years, refer to their notes and add to yours using their information)
4. See if there are any past papers and use them, google the answers if unknown.
5. Keep going through the same content, it will stick much quicker if you do it offen.

-Make sure you take regular breaks for your eyes especially when using a laptop/computer to revise
-Make sure you also do some physical activity, to increase circulation and productivity
-Make sure you have juice or water and some snack as well
-Try and get a sleep pattern - use the bedtime tab on iPhones (not sure on androids) or download an app, that way you obtain a routine for yourself
-Make sure you don't work all day! You will burn out!
-Ask for help when ever you need it - friends, family, teachers, etc.
-Make sure your physically and mentally well. Revision can be draining so always do something you love inbetween - drawing, dancing, listening to music (I don't listen to music when I work because I tend to end up singing the words or tapping my pen to the beat :confused:)
-Make revision fun! Make a quizlet, test your friends, etc.

Good luck for the upcoming exams
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jemima0103
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1) Work in a relaxing and calm environment

2) Take short breaks- 4, 30 minute blocks of revision are better than one long 2 hour one

3) Don't avoid the topics that you find difficult

4) Make sure you're doing useful and effective revision, not just copying out of a textbook or off a screen

5) practice exam papers and questions

6) Don't be afraid of taking a break and treating yourself every now and again

7) If something just isn't sticking in your brain then take a quick break and come back to it.

8) This is what helps me the most- Have something such as a picture, quote or anything that keeps you motivated and inspired to revise and do well
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Bill Nye
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
The fundamental step is to get yourself organised. Have you got a tidy workspace? If you think you work better in a clean environment organise your room as well! Organise loose sheets by chapter in folders, a to-do-list for things to do today etc.
lmao I would do this for ages and then not actually do any revision

The wonders of procrastination
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_pxmudi_
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First, get into a positive mindset. Without getting your mind cleared, no way can you attempt to do revision. Stop thinking about those low marks you got on that unit test. If others can do it, you can too. You just have to give it your best shot.
THE SPECIFICATION IS GOLD! The examiners would not ask you anything that is not in the spec. Do not solely rely on your textbook. The textbbok has some additional stuff that you don't want to be wasting time if you think you have so much of stuff to get in to your head. Download your specific specification, print it out if you need to, and go through it, checking whether you have learnt everything in there. Tick all the stuff you have learnt and make sure you do learn the stuff you haven't.
MAKE SHORT NOTES. Idk about you but this helps me a lot. Compressing all those textbook, school and tuition notes in your own wording and writing is active learning. I'd recommend getting separate books for separate subjects, without getting them all muddled up. (Make sure ALL your notes are organized. You do not want to be finding for that assignment your teacher gave last term the week before the exam.)
Then start making revision cards, flash cards, mindmaps and what not from your short notes. This makes you go over the material again. Make sure you highlight keywords, definitions and stuff. Just make it ideal for "on the go" revision
PAST PAPERS! DO, DO, DO AND DO THEM! I guarantee you that if you do as many past papers as you can, you will come across at least one repeated question in your exam. First you can do them while checking your notes, I find it helps as well. Then as exam time comes near you should start doing them in exam conditions, timing them, and then markng them using the mark schemes. Make sure you go through the examiner's reports as well.
LASTLY, SLEEP. Sleep is so important. At least make sure you get 6 hours of sleep. You don't want to be having dark circles for the "after-exam" parties.
HOPE THIS HELPED. HAPPY REVISION GUYS!
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shadowdweller
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Planning, planning, planning - even the best revision concepts are going to fail if you don't plan out your time properly. Make a timetable with your exams and your available time slots, and fill them out by priority of how much you need to learn and how confident you feel. Be sure to leave yourself some time in the last couple of weeks to do past papers and to go back over any questions you're getting wrong in those.
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The RAR
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(Original post by Dylann)
In subjects that require factual recall in which you are then expected to expand upon (economics, politics, history etc) use acronyms as they are like a mini plan for essays. For example, "What are the contributing factors to economic growth?". Create an acronym using the first letter of say five words related to each reason (Jobs, Banks, Investment, Infrastructure, Education) - Turn this into BEIJI (you can remember Beijing to make it easier). I haven't done economics in four years and this took me two minutes. I went into my a-level exams with about ten acronyms just like this and aced them.

Bonus tip: Don't waste time writing essays for every single past paper question in the above subjects, just write a plan and then compare to the mark scheme. Being able to plan and structure an essay is 90% of the difficulty - putting it into sentences is the easy bit.
That's actually a good tip I have never thought about, literally for every question in Geogrpahy, I just write out essays for all of them as I would in my real exams. It's honestly time consuming but I agree that planning and structing is where the problem lies, knowledge is good but exam technique needs to improve. So when I answer a question, do I just make bullet points of what I want to include and their explanation? Should I do this in my real exams too?
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Dylann
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(Original post by The RAR)
That's actually a good tip I have never thought about, literally for every question in Geogrpahy, I just write out essays for all of them as I would in my real exams. It's honestly time consuming but I agree that planning and structing is where the problem lies, knowledge is good but exam technique needs to improve. So when I answer a question, do I just make bullet points of what I want to include and their explanation? Should I do this in my real exams too?
Just write bullet points of the main arguments, if you want you can put examples next to them, if you know you can explain it then you don't need to write anything else. When you check the mark scheme be honest with whether or not you would have written that. Be extremely strict on yourself.

In the real exam, hopefully by this point you're so good at planning answers you can just immediately start the essay but there's no problem with jotting down your main points at the top just so you don't forget (also helps if you run out of time as it shows the examiner where you were going).
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greghayes
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If you're at university, there's a wonderful app called Hold which allows you to bascially lock your phone and rewards you for every 20 minutes that you don't touch it. They have things like NowTV vouchers, a chance to win Amazon and Co-op gift cards, money off technology, cheap cinema tickets etc. It also has a chart where you can see how long you've studied each day by how long you've been on hold (which makes you realise that you usually only do about 3 hours when you think you're doing 6...). I think it only works for universities at the moment but not sure.

General revision tips:

  • Rather than make a set timed revision plan, outline what modules you're going to study that day instead. It means that you're not watching the clock and you can spend longer on some things than others where needed. Also, if you finish early, the rest of the day is yours guilt-free!
  • Use past papers as much as possible and get used to marking them yourself. Once you've read a couple of mark schemes, you start to know what the examiners expect your answer to look like so your marks will improve.
  • If you're literally at the point where it's just learning it now, use the 25-5 method. Study for 25 minutes then take a 5 minute break. There's free apps you can get so you're not tempted to stay in your break longer. It actually made me feel more productive because I was challenging myself to have learnt up to a certain point by the next break.
  • There are loads of revision videos on youtube so if you don't feel like textbooks are helping, there will be someone online who's explained it in a way that will help.
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DiamondDia
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To write questions on a revision card and write answers at the back, have a friend or family member quiz you on the questions and they can tell you whether you got it right or not
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medicportaler
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Make the most of all the documents made available to you from the exam board for your qualification!
Use the specification to check you know all the content and that your notes cover anything you might be asked in the exam. Do past papers in timed conditions to mimic an exam scenario. Then mark your answers using the mark scheme, underlining the key parts of your answers that allow you to score marks. Use the examiner's reports to identify common mistakes and how to avoid them. Finally, go back to your notes and add to or rewrite them using the exam specific wording used on the mark schemes and examiner's reports.
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emilysandres
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(Original post by Evil Homer)
Hey Grow your Graders!

Our New Year study resolutions competition did so well... we have decided to do it again!

Unfortunately its that time of the year where we have to start thinking about that dreaded word.............. revision. To ease the pain we have decided to give away a £25 Amazon voucher to a random winner in this thread!

Simply share your best revision tips here on this thread to be in with a chance to win! We will collect all the best revision and study tips and put them into an article and promote them across our social media platforms

Anything goes, don't be shy, share how you're planning on acing your exams.

Like always everyone is free to get involved, the more the merrier.

Best of luck everyone

Make questions out of your textbook while you're reading on a separate piece of paper answer them later and correct any mistakes . Flashcards . Blurting - write a key topic on a piece of paper and then not down everything you know from memory. Past paper questions . Making notes from the specification and making sure you cover everything in it . Making a time table and planning it so you cover past content aswell
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notdyls
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Doing as many past papers as you physically can is counterintuitive. Limit how much time you spend on revision, and do other things too. It'll stop you from getting burnt out.
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MH1234567
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A level chemistry revison below 500+ flashcards and exampro questions as and a2 for EVERY topic below:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1PN...qDXktppJF2cT7h
https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...c3BGxs5_te_saa
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randomstudent321
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(Original post by Evil Homer)
Hey Grow your Graders!

Our New Year study resolutions competition did so well... we have decided to do it again!

Unfortunately its that time of the year where we have to start thinking about that dreaded word.............. revision. To ease the pain we have decided to give away a £25 Amazon voucher to a random winner in this thread!

Simply share your best revision tips here on this thread to be in with a chance to win! We will collect all the best revision and study tips and put them into an article and promote them across our social media platforms

Anything goes, don't be shy, share how you're planning on acing your exams.

Like always everyone is free to get involved, the more the merrier.

Best of luck everyone

The best thing to do is make a list of past paper questions you want to complete for your exam, colour code them for each month and stick to your timetable of doing them all by the time the real exam comes by. By not putting a specific date on them, you won't feel bad you miss a day. Try mixing them up so you don't do the whole of one topic in the space of a month. This way you'll be constantly revisiting and refreshing your knowledge.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Don't waste time making your notes pretty.
Agree with this, some people seem to spend more time colouring timetables than actually doing any work. Is why i find bullet journals pointless, yeh they look pretty but in the time it took to do all the fancy titles you could have probably done like half the tasks on the list
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Kumail110
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nice tips
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pericardium
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Keep on top of your notes right from the beginning of the year - it'll pay off massively in the end and you won't find yourself cramming a load of revision notes together a few weeks before your exams! Good luck.
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barror1
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I think the best piece of advice I can give is to know how you learn. I retain information in different ways than my peers and typically use different methods to them (my headteacher literally laughed in my face when I said I hated self-assessment). If it is flashcards, highlighting, or reading from the textbook, try studying with numerous methods and see what sticks.
Also, start revising early! I personally set weekly goals for my work to allow for a more flexible timetable (eg. revising for other tests, going out with friends). So long as you revise content one way or another, it will be a massive help!
My final little nugget of wisdom is that you need time to focus on essay skills. This reason meant that I probably got an A instead of an A* in my English Language A-level. This year, I'm hoping to cover all content by April to allow time to hone in on my essay skills.
Best of luck! <3
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vortex13
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I usually go through and highlight the revision lists we get given in green for things I think I know, Orange for things I’m not sure of and red for things I don’t know.

After this I make sure to test myself on/ get someone else to test myself on/ try to teach everything I’ve highlighted in green to one of my stuffed animals (if you can teach something you have to know it well) to see if I need to change them to orange or not.

Then I go over my notes to jog my memory and make sure that I understand everything and if I don’t ill try and re-learn them

After this I make a checklist for each subject ordered by importance from stuff that needs a lot of work to things I practically know

I try to make my own worksheets using something like wordmint if they’re going to be longer or just write small chapter quizzes out for myself and make a answer key with my notes to make sure I include everything and that my answer sheet is full of modal answers

I print a couple copies out and do many attempts until I’m writing the answers down that’ll actually get me the marks

Alternatively to doing my own worksheets, sometimes making flashcards is better. I sometimes do this on physical flash cards but a lot of the time it’s just quizlet

At the end I get someone to test me in everything to make sure I can respond quickly and I always try to prepare for the worst because I’d rather do that than underprepare, if I have time

I’m in Year 9 so we don’t really have past papers or specifications or anything but this seems to work for the bigger exams that we have at the end of the year. For the smaller ones throughout the year I don’t usually do all this, only a couple of the steps, probably reading through notes, making quizzes/flashcards and getting someone to test me.

Hope this helps!
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bethyh1996
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flash cards and mind maps with lots of colours.
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