Grow your Grades revision tips competition Watch

camnduong
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#81
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#81
1) Do as much exam past papers as you can
2) Answer all the challenging questions in your text book to have a better understanding of examining style questions
3) senecalearning a useful free resource to help consolidate your knowledge
4) Set yourself specific hours for what subjects you're going to revise
5) Make notes and flashcards
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lula7464
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#82
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#82
Teach/tutor others!

It not only helps them but you benefit by having to go over things, be questioned on tough ideas (and maybe get paid) - I'm doing it free for a couple people in the year below and it's incredible how much better I know the content.
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rubyft123
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#83
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Honestly, practice papers and exam-style questions are one of the best ways to revise. I find going through them and revising topics that you struggle on as you go through a paper can be really helpful as they highlight your weaknesses and actually test your understanding.

For maths, I find the 5-a-day questions on Corbett maths are great as it's only a few minutes each day but tests lots of subjects and works great as gradual revision.
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Chemistry_Queen
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#84
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#84
Ask older students for their tips - how they studied, any tips they have, websites/textbooks they used, how they structure their revision etc. this wil by FAR the most beneficial thing that you can do.
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diancie
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#85
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Your first step is motivation. Motivation for getting the grades in the first place. Perhaps you need the grades to get into your dream University. Picture that University in your mind every time you feel like giving up or procrastinating. Keep thinking of where this will lead to.

After that, planning is essential. Create a timetable which allows you to complete your revision efficiently. You don't need to do this on your own, I used https://getrevising.co.uk/planner which automatically personalised a timetable for my needs.

In order to memorise information in Biology, I used Anki which was really efficient in helping me memorise things. Quizlet was best for me to revise French, I usually started my day and ended my night by revising French words on there.

Wherever Chemistry, Physics and Maths are concerned - past papers, past papers and lastly, past papers! Questions are continuously repeated in past papers and the mark scheme allows you to know and understand how to answer a question. After doing a past paper, take a notebook and write down each question you got wrong and why you got it wrong. This will enable you to rectify your mistakes. A good website to access past papers is https://freeexampapers.com, and more resources can also be found at Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/alevel/ https://www.reddit.com/r/ibo/ https://www.reddit.com/r/GCSE/ https://www.reddit.com/r/igcse/.

Other websites which I found useful:

IB
https://www.ibsurvival.com/
https://thesciencecodex.wordpress.com/

IGCSE
http://www.igcsecentre.com/cambridge...t-exam-papers/
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/
https://znotes.org/ (also helpful for A Levels)

Believe in yourself!
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Noodlzzz
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#86
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#86
Some people like to watch youtube videos of others revising in real time to work at the same time to. I never really got the appeal tbh.
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je m'en fiche
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#87
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#87
I found this method very useful to test if you have enough knowledge to secure an A* in any kind of test. You have to be really familiar with the content. When I think I have finished revision for a particular chapter, I take a blank piece of paper and write everything I know from the chapter including all processes, chemical equations and information without looking at any of materials. I then compare my my answer with the specification to see if I have got all the key points. If I didn't, that means more revision for me!
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Jasyy
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#88
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#88
If you struggle with maths or anything else like me heres a few tips
- Try your best in class don't worry if you make mistakes ask for help if needed
- Go home and watch a maths tutorial on that subject you have learnt at school
- Do worksheets on that subject until the skills you have learnt sticks in your head
do this everyday for an hour and trust me it will help
AND IF YOU FEEL EXTRA Study the next subject so you can beat your class too it
best time to study for your GCSES are DURING THE EASTER HOLIDAYS
[MAKE SURE TO DO THIS FOR EACH OF YOUR SUBJECTS NOT ONLY MATHS IM JUST SAYING MATHS BECAUSE IM STUDYING IT]
GOOD LUCK
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NoorJ_2948
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#89
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I actually published an article on this matter a few days ago on TSR 😊

Here's the link:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/rev...acksunravelled
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DeepInTheMeadow
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#90
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#90
Personally I try to first obtain the complete basic knowledge, make much more complex notes for potential essays, condense work into flashcards and then test all throughout the year to check your knowledge. It's a marathon, not a sprint!
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gdickenson
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#91
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#91
Try writing cards with a summary of every topic after each lesson (like a card for each page of the revision guide) and then when it comes to revision, write out a few key points for that topic or if you are more confident with it, just a key word. Write down everything you know and then go through it with the card and add anything you forgot to write down but know in one colour pen and anything you didnt write down but also dont know about that topic in a different colour. You can then repeat until you end up with less in coloured pens, or write a seperate sheet out of everything you forgot to include the first time and read this through last minute and ask someone to test you on it.
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ROUNDER
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#92
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#92
Using online resources is a very beneficial method because it allows you to cintiue your work wherever you go without having to carry anything or worry about losing/ damaging your work. This means if you have a long car drive, holiday, free period at school or are at a friends house you can easily revise. (For those who like physical copies you can print the resources from most apps and websites). My personal reccomendations:
ANKIWEB : A digital flashcard program that stores all your cards on oneaccount under different decks. Depending on how easy you found answering each one it will decide the timespan between your next review - organising and tailoring your learning experience which incorporates active learning (questioning yourself) and spaced repetition
EVERNOTE : An online notetaking service that allows you to organsie notes in notebooks, highlight, bold and itallicise words to help you remember. Photos, videos and practice questions and much more can be embedded into your notes for when you review it next
SENECA: An online service that contains resources for pretty much every subject and exam board. Each subject will be split into the relevant subtopics with images, gifs and memes to help you learn and answer questions with a live leaderboard and progression system. Really fun to use and it definitely makes it easier to forget that you are actually doing work
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HungryNiceGuy
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#93
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#93
Make revision cards?
Then do every single past paper you find...
after each paper you become better

idek why i am here
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Baza2002
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#94
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#94
Revise in a way that suits you.
If one day you know you need to revise but can't be bothered, watch videos and talk to friends about the subject.
Reward yourself as motivation. Have a bit of chocolate after achieving a small goal you've set.
Make your notes easy to look at. Try and keep them consice so when you only have a bit of time, it's easy to spend 5 minutes revising.
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PrinceOfRavioli
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#95
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Actually revise! Find what works best for you, whether it be websites such as Seneca Learning (my personal favourite!) or BBC Bitesize, or making spider diagrams, taking colourful notes, or flashcards. If you have time, try two methods! It helps it stick, from personal experience, as it gives you two memory sources to remember it from, as well as your lesson and the book.

Watch some videos on how to get top marks in your coursework (I like videos such as "15 Quick Tips to GCSE Art" and looking at sketchbook tours - sometimes they can make you think, "Oh, well, now my sketchbook doesn't look very good," but it gives you ideas and inspiration as to how you can improve or start to make your work really wow the examiner!), or watch summary channels such as freesciencelessons or Primrose Kitten, or find your own channel who covers your topic and exam board! Ask your teacher for a copy of the specification if you can, particularly if you have a coursework subject such as art - and follow it. Imagine you are the examiner, go through it and mark it. Find an area where you don't have many marks? Improve it! Nobody is expecting you to get full marks right off the bat, but you always need to work and improve your pieces in order to reach the top grade boundary. There are some good past paper sites such as revision maths and revision science, where the papers from whatever mark scheme are free to download, as are the mark schemes.

Good luck in revision, all!
Last edited by PrinceOfRavioli; 1 week ago
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Toastiekid
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#96
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#96
As economics is my only essay subject (and the only subject I'm taking an exam in this year) I'm going to focus on doing questions in timed conditions as that'll help me during the exams and begin reading the news every day as that'll give me some of the application knowledge I'll need to whip out during the exams.
With maths and further maths I'm going to stop leaving my revision to the three days before the exam by making a list of all the topics we've done this year and checking what I've forgotten. I'll then either reteach myself the topic or go to the extra maths sessions afterschool.
I hate revising physics so sitting down and doing any revision would be an improvement
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tellbell
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#97
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1) Always start with the topics that you struggle the most with, its all fun and games doing the easy things however exams are not easy unfortunately.
2) Find out what type of revisor you are for example visual
3) Past papers past papers past papers
4) Use your teachersssssssss! Cannot empathsise this enough... stress them out, get there email, visit them after school its all worth it when you pass
5) Get people to quiz you, teachers, parents, friends... Keeps you on your toes.
6) Teach people, it makes you feel as though you know what you're talking about which indirecctly helps you remember information... Its been proven scientifically
7) Use youtube videos, download them to watch on the go eg on the bus, train or when you're just relaxing
8) Use online resources such as GetRevising, Quizlet to constanly test you and educate you... Also good to get your mum off your back when she says "you're always on that phone "
9) When you have a mock dont leave it last minute ... practice for the real thing
10) Dont stress, do it in chunks so it dosen't become overwhelming for you.
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IDOZ
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#98
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#98
Oh yeah, and don’t revise on the night before your exam
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barror1
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#99
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(Original post by IDOZ)
Oh yeah, and don’t revise on the night before your exam
Well not all the revision
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damhashj
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#100
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#100
Don't just study something once.
Recap what you have studied the next day, and then at the end of the week, to get it into your long term memory.
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