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ThomasGeography
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What’s a good first car to buy for around £1500 used?
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tesconyc
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old Clio 2010
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crg12165
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(Original post by ThomasGeography)
What’s a good first car to buy for around £1500 used?
2007ish Seat Ibiza 1.2 reference sport
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IWMTom
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(Original post by ThomasGeography)
What’s a good first car to buy for around £1500 used?
Whatever is cheapest to insure.
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Joshyouare
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Yeah run a few quotes for insurance first. That's what I did, found out that Ford Ka's were the cheapest for me. Got myself a lovely tomato red one with 30,000 miles on for 600 quid . 1200 to insure without a box - bargain.

Depends on if you have any requirements, for example, i've just bought an astra because I needed a bigger car and it's only 1200 to insure without a box, again for a decently quick car that's very cheap on insurance. Lots more than speed obviously come into the equation though but it's a good starting point!
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MrCole&Co
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As people have said, cheapest to insure.

I got a 2008 Vauxhall Corsa Breeze plus CDTI 1.3 diesel for 1350.

Insurance with no box is 2300
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Homemadeslaw
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Get a mini one 1.6.
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IDOZ
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Mine's a 2003 Renault Clio.
Its only a few hundred quid online.

:google:
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modifiedgenes
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Don't buy a diesel unless you are doing more than 12,000 miles per year. They are hugely more complex than petrol cars, cost more to service and won't save you any money on that limited mileage. They are also noisier and little cheap ones vibrate a lot.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by modifiedgenes)
They are hugely more complex than petrol cars, cost more to service
Interesting hypothesis..
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modifiedgenes
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(Original post by IWMTom)
Interesting hypothesis..
Not really. Diesel- glow plugs and then a turbocharger on most of them. Then EGR or SCR, and a DPF... and you are chasing an increasingly complex engineering circus.

A conventional petrol engine, a little 4 (or 3) cylinder machine, no turbocharger, just a catalytic converter, some injectors and coil packs. Done.

There is no real advantage to having a diesel in something the size of a Corsa- they are small cars and their little petrol engines are consequently very fuel efficient anyway. Sure they are never going to win awards in torque or acceleration but neither is a 1.3 diesel either.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by modifiedgenes)
Not really. Diesel- glow plugs and then a turbocharger on most of them. Then EGR or SCR, and a DPF... and you are chasing an increasingly complex engineering circus.

A conventional petrol engine, a little 4 (or 3) cylinder machine, no turbocharger, just a catalytic converter, some injectors and coil packs. Done.

There is no real advantage to having a diesel in something the size of a Corsa- they are small cars and their little petrol engines are consequently very fuel efficient anyway. Sure they are never going to win awards in torque or acceleration but neither is a 1.3 diesel either.
Because we don't fit turbos to petrol engines too? :laugh:

Glow plugs? Great - but there's no spark plugs.
Emissions I'll give you that.

In terms of servicing costs, though, I must disagree entirely. The cost to service a petrol car is the same as servicing a diesel car.
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sh9
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(Original post by ThomasGeography)
What’s a good first car to buy for around £1500 used?
I got a used Hyundai i20 for £1500 and have had it for 2 years now. I had a seat ibiza before this and when I switched cars I thought the hyundai felt very nippy in comparison to the seat. The hyundai i20 is very easy to drive and it's difficult to stall, I've only ever stalled it a handful of times. I've got the 5 door and it's basically the same design as a Corsa. Would recommend as a beginner car.
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modifiedgenes
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(Original post by IWMTom)
Because we don't fit turbos to petrol engines too? :laugh:

Glow plugs? Great - but there's no spark plugs.
Emissions I'll give you that.

In terms of servicing costs, though, I must disagree entirely. The cost to service a petrol car is the same as servicing a diesel car.
A spark plug is a relatively cheap component and they have a known service life. They are also very easy to change.

Turbo-charging is not required for a petrol car, a naturally aspirated diesel is by contrast, an infernal machine.

You can't know much about cars if you believe they cost the same to service irrespective of what kind of engine they have.

Petrol engines are intrinsically simpler machines on the whole.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by modifiedgenes)
A spark plug is a relatively cheap component and they have a known service life. They are also very easy to change.

Turbo-charging is not required for a petrol car, a naturally aspirated diesel is by contrast, an infernal machine.

You can't know much about cars if you believe they cost the same to service irrespective of what kind of engine they have.

Petrol engines are intrinsically simpler machines on the whole.
Glow plugs are relatively cheap and generally simple to change...

Go to any garage on the planet and ask for a service - the price will be the same regardless of fuel type.
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modifiedgenes
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(Original post by IWMTom)
Glow plugs are relatively cheap and generally simple to change...

Go to any garage on the planet and ask for a service - the price will be the same regardless of fuel type.
Ok, we will have to agree to disagree.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by modifiedgenes)
Ok, we will have to agree to disagree.
It's quite literally fact.

Volkswagen: £179 (minor)
Volkswagen: £349 (major)

Halfrauds: £139 (minor)
Halfrauds: £195 (major)

In N Out: £134 (minor)
In N Out: £194 (major)

No one charges more to give a routine service to a diesel engine than a petrol engine. Long term repair costs.. possibly.. routine servicing? Nope.

I rest my case
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swelshie
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Have run old diesel car from about 50k to 110k miles (57 plate focus). No higher costs due to it being a diesel. £5 for a split turbo hose one time.
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Emma:-)
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hyundai getz, hyundai i10, hyundai i20, nissan micra, kia picanto, citroen c1, peugeot 107.
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