Do GCSEs actually matter ? Watch

MichaelTownly
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#141
Report 2 months ago
#141
(Original post by bambs123)
Yes yes yesss, I really regret not taking mine seriously because although mine were not horrendous (3As, 7Bs) they did cost me a university offer last year at one of my top choices. I never thought I’d need them but honestly you’ll never know who will ask for them so it’s definitely better to be safe than sorry. Also, you’re only in year 10! Don’t stress, as long as you keep doing small but consistent amounts of work leading up till GCSEs then you’ll find the bulkier revision around March time will be a lottt easier
Which University did you apply for? Are you sure that your GCSE grades are the sole factors for your rejection?
0
reply
MichaelTownly
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#142
Report 2 months ago
#142
Do you think you would have been accepted by your top choice if you had perfect GCSE grades?
0
reply
Olalola
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#143
Report 2 months ago
#143
I’d say yes, they do matter AND no, they don’t. You are the person you decide to be. GCSEs or not. And ultimately, you can take them at evening classes in the future.
Your grades, no matter how dire or stellar, will never reflect who you are. But, they can smooth the paths ahead or make the roads more challenging, tiresome and difficult.
I am retaking my maths GCSE over 30 years after the first attempts (D, and D again). I didn’t do the homework in the year leading up to my exams, let alone revision (doodling a boyfriend’s name, partying, anything but study).
I fought for my place to take A’levels. Passed. Just. Had I revised, had better attendance, the grades would have been better.
I fought like hell for a Uni place and it went to panels and meetings until I won over the key decison maker. Again, a lot of hassle and time could have been avoided by actually studying to begin with.
Degree done (1% off a 1st), a Post Grad done. So GCSEs shouldn’t matter, right? Wrong.
They did. Turns out a pass at GCSE maths equated to career jumps and promotions to the tune of a good £30k pa, until I gave up work. Board’s like to see GCSE maths on the CV of managers in charge of budgets. Director? You need Maths.
Me? I’m taking my GCSE maths again now. Over 30 years later. So I can get a minimum wage job in a school to fit around my kids.
Do GCSEs really matter? No. But without effort now, and passes, they can make your life harder than it needs to be. Now is your time and opportunity to try your best. Because when I was passed over at interviews or work, it was my effort (lack of) that infuriated me, not the grade.
Now. 2 kids. Full time job. Constant cleaning and feeding of children and appliances. And crammimg GCSE maths into 1 evening a week x
Last edited by Olalola; 2 months ago
0
reply
ArghhhNo
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#144
Report 2 months ago
#144
I get that, must say never have I been asked to prove my “7 GCSE” on my CV and it’s never affected my pay.
Just the opportunity into uni and to do the equivalent on a dimpolma route.

I’ve done higher qualifications but now I’m back filling that Maths!
(Original post by Olalola)
I’d say yes, they do matter AND no, they don’t. You are the person you decide to be. GCSEs or not. And ultimately, you can take them at evening classes in the future.
Your grades, no matter how dire or stellar, will never reflect who you are. But, they can smooth the paths ahead or make the roads more challenging, tiresome and difficult.
I am retaking my maths GCSE over 30 years after the first attempts (D, and D again). I didn’t do the homework in the year leading up to my exams, let alone revision (doodling a boyfriend’s name, partying, anything but study).
I fought for my place to take A’levels. Passed. Just. Had I revised, had better attendance, the grades would have been better.
I fought like hell for a Uni place and it went to panels and meetings until I won over the key decison maker. Again, a lot of hassle and time could have been avoided by actually studying to begin with.
Degree done (1% off a 1st), a Post Grad done. So GCSEs shouldn’t matter, right? Wrong.
They did. Turns out a pass at GCSE maths equated to career jumps and promotions to the tune of a good £30k pa, until I gave up work. Board’s like to see GCSE maths on the CV of managers in charge of budgets. Director? You need Maths. And, ime, twits with little experience or common sense were promoted time and time again because they came armed with passes (no relevant experience or degrees). One of those twits is now the Director of the department I worked in. He is on a hefty wage.
Me? I’m taking my GCSE maths again now. Over 30 years later. So I can get a minimum wage job in a school to fit around my kids.
Do GCSEs really matter? No. But without effort now, and passes, they can make your life harder than it needs to be. Now is your time and opportunity to try your best. Because when I was passed over at interviews or work, it was my effort (lack of) that infuriated me, not the grade.
Now. 2 kids. Full time job. Constant cleaning and feeding of children and appliances. And crammimg GCSE maths into 1 evening a week for 8 months.... I wish I studied 30 years ago x
0
reply
help_me_learn
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#145
Report 2 months ago
#145
(Original post by Vits1)
only matters for medicine and other competitive courses IMO. Just do good in english and maths and you should be good
i am in yr 11 right now so i am not really sure but want to do medicine in the future.
i heard from an university student that apparently for medicine they only look at whether or not u got a 5 for maths and English and science for GCSEs but primarily just look at ur Alevels since that is the most important.

but from what ur saying, if u want to do medicine u have to do really good at English and maths. how good tho? 8/9s? or is 6/7 okay?

but my main question is- is what the uni student said true?
0
reply
ArghhhNo
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#146
Report 2 months ago
#146
The higher the better because you are competeting for places, the course I’m
Trying to get on have 300 applicators for 10 places!
So you need to the best you can.
(Original post by help_me_learn)
i am in yr 11 right now so i am not really sure but want to do medicine in the future.
i heard from an university student that apparently for medicine they only look at whether or not u got a 5 for maths and English and science for GCSEs but primarily just look at ur Alevels since that is the most important.

but from what ur saying, if u want to do medicine u have to do really good at English and maths. how good tho? 8/9s? or is 6/7 okay?

but my main question is- is what the uni student said true?
0
reply
help_me_learn
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#147
Report 2 months ago
#147
oh wow u do medicine?! u must be really smart!

but don't they compare in terms of your results in exams? like your medical examinations?
how would GCSEs affect how you do in the future. eg if i get 5/6s for GCSE but then i start building myself up and start getting top marks in Alevels , shouldn't that get me closer to medicine since during that PRESENT time, i am excelling in what i want to study?

since u r competing with 299 other applicators, shouldn't the exam u r doing for that determine who gets in? and if there are a lot of people with really high grades, they would just look at ur a-level results right?
(Original post by ArghhhNo)
The higher the better because you are competeting for places, the course I’m
Trying to get on have 300 applicators for 10 places!
So you need to the best you can.
0
reply
ArghhhNo
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#148
Report 2 months ago
#148
I’m going into dentistry, I’m in My 30’s and competing against student who are in recent study.
I suppose why a personal statement is so vital to get right, I can’t give the uni a reason not to look at that.
So I must get good grades to meet the application critic, GCSEs they are looking at 4 + , I’m confident with the stages after that.
(Original post by help_me_learn)
oh wow u do medicine?! u must be really smart!

but don't they compare in terms of your results in exams? like your medical examinations?
how would GCSEs affect how you do in the future. eg if i get 5/6s for GCSE but then i start building myself up and start getting top marks in Alevels , shouldn't that get me closer to medicine since during that PRESENT time, i am excelling in what i want to study?

since u r competing with 299 other applicators, shouldn't the exam u r doing for that determine who gets in? and if there are a lot of people with really high grades, they would just look at ur a-level results right?
0
reply
Joannxkm
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#149
Report 2 months ago
#149
Hi! I’m 18 currently doing my A Levels! I got quite good GCSEs and I found when looking at universities this past year they do look at them! My best advice for GCSE is to try your best and secure at least maths, english (science too). They matter for results day to get into college/sixth form and then they matter again when applying for uni (but the most important thing is your a level for uni). I’ll sign this off with my initials if you want to contact me for some help again! - JK
0
reply
Greywolftwo
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#150
Report 2 months ago
#150
(Original post by Gabbyyyxxx)
I’m in year 10 soon to be in year 11 but I feel like everyone is over stressing about GCSES like I do understand because I’m stressing but sometimes I come to think of it do they actually matter? Please tell me ur opinions below
It’s annoying I know that teachers often say that GCSEs mean everything in life, I have spoken to many older and successful people who have said that GCSEs really don’t matter, I have also spoken to a lot of people in uni and they said that their uni didn’t even ask for GCSE results only A level results. If you fail at GCSEs or still do well but not as much as you hoped for, it is not the be all end all sort of thing
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
Last edited by Greywolftwo; 2 months ago
1
reply
Greywolftwo
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#151
Report 2 months ago
#151
Wait why have lots of people I have spoken to said that they do not matter later in life?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
MichaelTownly
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#152
Report 2 months ago
#152
(Original post by Greywolftwo)
It’s annoying I know that teachers often say that GCSEs mean everything in life, I have spoken to many older and successful people who have said that GCSEs really don’t matter, I have also spoken to a lot of people in uni and they said that their uni didn’t even ask for GCSE results only A level results. If you fail at GCSEs or still do well but not as much as you hoped for, it is not the be all end all sort of thing
Schools need students' grades to get good ratings; teachers need good results from their students so that senior teachers can stop complaining about poor results. I think that it is not wrong to suggest that students' GCSE grades overall influence the school and the teachers more than the students themselves. For example, if the majority of a music class failed to reach their target grades, it wouldn't affect them too much since most people don't do music in university nor college. However, the teacher of that class and possibly the department as a whole would be told off by the teachers holding senior positions.
Last edited by MichaelTownly; 2 months ago
0
reply
MichaelTownly
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#153
Report 2 months ago
#153
(Original post by Greywolftwo)
Wait why have lots of people I have spoken to said that they do not matter later in life?
Because generally they do not matter later in life, especially for careers that require university degrees.
0
reply
学生の父
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#154
Report 2 months ago
#154
No, perhaps not for graduate careers (although teaching is an exception).

I have to assess job applications for C1, C2 and D positions, and one of the things we do look at is the candidate's GCSE (and other Level 1 and 2 qualifications) profile.

This is true even for people applying for posts in their 40s and 50s.

Perhaps it is true that GCSEs matter less later in life if you have a good honours degree, but most people in Britain are not university graduates.
(Original post by MichaelTownly)
Because generally they do not matter later in life, especially for careers that require university degrees.
0
reply
MichaelTownly
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#155
Report 2 months ago
#155
(Original post by 学生の父)
No, perhaps not for graduate careers (although teaching is an exception).

I have to assess job applications for C1, C2 and D positions, and one of the things we do look at is the candidate's GCSE (and other Level 1 and 2 qualifications) profile.

This is true even for people applying for posts in their 40s and 50s.

Perhaps it is true that GCSEs matter less later in life if you have a good honours degree, but most people in Britain are not university graduates.
But much do GCSEs weight compared to other factors?
0
reply
学生の父
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#156
Report 2 months ago
#156
It does depend on the job, but 5 Cs (4s in today's money) at GCSE is still considered a benchmark of good secondary education for many non-graduate positions.
(Original post by MichaelTownly)
But much do GCSEs weight compared to other factors?
0
reply
cf_99
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#157
Report 2 months ago
#157
(Original post by Olalola)
I’d say yes, they do matter AND no, they don’t. You are the person you decide to be. GCSEs or not. And ultimately, you can take them at evening classes in the future.
Your grades, no matter how dire or stellar, will never reflect who you are. But, they can smooth the paths ahead or make the roads more challenging, tiresome and difficult.
I am retaking my maths GCSE over 30 years after the first attempts (D, and D again). I didn’t do the homework in the year leading up to my exams, let alone revision (doodling a boyfriend’s name, partying, anything but study).
I fought for my place to take A’levels. Passed. Just. Had I revised, had better attendance, the grades would have been better.
I fought like hell for a Uni place and it went to panels and meetings until I won over the key decison maker. Again, a lot of hassle and time could have been avoided by actually studying to begin with.
Degree done (1% off a 1st), a Post Grad done. So GCSEs shouldn’t matter, right? Wrong.
They did. Turns out a pass at GCSE maths equated to career jumps and promotions to the tune of a good £30k pa, until I gave up work. Board’s like to see GCSE maths on the CV of managers in charge of budgets. Director? You need Maths.
Me? I’m taking my GCSE maths again now. Over 30 years later. So I can get a minimum wage job in a school to fit around my kids.
Do GCSEs really matter? No. But without effort now, and passes, they can make your life harder than it needs to be. Now is your time and opportunity to try your best. Because when I was passed over at interviews or work, it was my effort (lack of) that infuriated me, not the grade.
Now. 2 kids. Full time job. Constant cleaning and feeding of children and appliances. And crammimg GCSE maths into 1 evening a week x
(Original post by 学生の父)
No, perhaps not for graduate careers (although teaching is an exception).

I have to assess job applications for C1, C2 and D positions, and one of the things we do look at is the candidate's GCSE (and other Level 1 and 2 qualifications) profile.

This is true even for people applying for posts in their 40s and 50s.

Perhaps it is true that GCSEs matter less later in life if you have a good honours degree, but most people in Britain are not university graduates.
Olalola,That's just...wow. Do employers really have any flexibility on the situation? Because it boggles my mind that GCSEs, a qualification taken at 16 years old have so much weight on a person's future life opportunities. You'd have clearly proven that you have the skills necessary (at the interview) that would gain you whatever the pass is at GCSE is, right? What about your university degree, clearly it contained mathematical and linguistic elements that would exceed the requirement? It baffles me that employers, who are clearly smart enough to be in their positions can be so thick when it comes to the simple process of hiring workers. And I thought top companies filtering out leaving cert scores here was bad...

It's funny because one of the key things stopping Irish people from applying to English unis is the fact that they actually look at JC results, (rough equivalent of GCSEs taken at 15). Irish unis don't even know whether you've sat the JC, let alone care about your grades. But I didn't know that this actually continued right up into the job industry. The JC was stressful enough, but I can't imagine how ridiculously cruel GCSEs must be on young people. At least afterwards there's options, I suppose.
0
reply
alexa_g62
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#158
Report 4 weeks ago
#158
I used to think they didn't matter at all boy was i wrong if u wanna do medicine or dentistry (medicine related courses) they definitely look at gcse results especially the amount of 7-9’s u have, also if u wanna get into a good sixth form or collage there gonna look at ur gcse results u should definitely try to get into a good sixth form one that will help u get the best grades for uni, i just stuck to my schools sixth form literally the worst decision
(Original post by Gabbyyyxxx)
I’m in year 10 soon to be in year 11 but I feel like everyone is over stressing about GCSES like I do understand because I’m stressing but sometimes I come to think of it do they actually matter? Please tell me ur opinions below
0
reply
bark555
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#159
Report 4 weeks ago
#159
(Original post by Gabbyyyxxx)
I’m in year 10 soon to be in year 11 but I feel like everyone is over stressing about GCSES like I do understand because I’m stressing but sometimes I come to think of it do they actually matter? Please tell me ur opinions below
Why do people go to school? It is surprisingly easy to get out of, and it is much easier and quicker to do your GCSEs on you own. You can study at your own pace, you can stop and start when you feel like it and you will be well rested as you won't have to get up in the morning.
0
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#160
Report 4 weeks ago
#160
(Original post by 学生の父)
No, perhaps not for graduate careers (although teaching is an exception).

I have to assess job applications for C1, C2 and D positions, and one of the things we do look at is the candidate's GCSE (and other Level 1 and 2 qualifications) profile.

This is true even for people applying for posts in their 40s and 50s.
How actually do you assess GCSE grades? Do you value certain subjects more than others? Are there any subjects that you don't really care much about? Do you give extra credit for students who have taken more than 8 subjects for GCSE?

Perhaps it is true that GCSEs matter less later in life if you have a good honours degree, but most people in Britain are not university graduates.
What about people with other qualifications they have higher than a GCSE but lower than a degree such as HNC, A Level, BTEC, City & Guilds, etc?

Some of them (including myself) have moved directly into them without taking GCSEs.

(Original post by 学生の父)
It does depend on the job, but 5 Cs (4s in today's money) at GCSE is still considered a benchmark of good secondary education for many non-graduate positions.
That's actually a legacy from the CSE era when a grade C at GCSE was made equivalent in value to grade 1 at CSE.

I find it cause for concern that employers rarely care about whether that C grade was achieved by taking the foundation or higher GCSE exam paper - their curricula are different. This resulted in a culture in schools under the NuLab government to focus efforts onto making students only sit the foundation level paper as an easy way for them to get the C grade rather than encouraging students to sit the higher level paper and providing effective teaching and support services for students taking it.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,500

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (213)
12.71%
Excited (151)
9.01%
Worried (303)
18.08%
Terrified (375)
22.37%
Meh (155)
9.25%
Confused (37)
2.21%
Putting on a brave face (230)
13.72%
Impatient (212)
12.65%

Watched Threads

View All