ccchimpo
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What's the exact difference between Computer Science and Computing? Which one is best if I wanna do software engineering?
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winterscoming
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The general answer is that it depends upon the university; the title of a degree doesn't really tell you any anywhere near enough useful information - you need to read into the content of different courses at different universities, as well as the descriptions of the modules.

However, it's usually the case that 'Computing' is an umbrella term for a lot of different courses that a university offers. Computer Science tends to be a specific degree; sometimes it's a mathematical and theoretical degree if you end up studying at one of the 'top 20' universities. Other times it's a lot more vocational, and focuses on technical skills (which will include software engineering, but can also include other skills such as networking and hardware) -- the universities outside of the 'top-20' usually have more of this and a lot less maths/theory.

A lot of universities also offer specific degrees in Software Engineering (which is yet another 'type' of Computing course) - obviously those are deliberately aimed at people wishing to get into a software engineering career because it focuses on all the skills you'd need for that without other topics like networking/hardware.

Lastly it's sometimes possible to find generic "computing" degrees which have very few core/mandatory modules, where students are given a lot more freedom and flexibility to pick and choose the a lot more modules from a range of options from the university's Computing module catalogue.

Also, make sure you look at other things too:
- Connections with employers and industry partners,
- Does the degree include an industrial placement option (industrial placements are really valuable for your employability prospects)
- Any options to work towards industry-recognised certification as part of a degree, such as those from Microsoft/Oracle/Amazon/Cisco/etc.
- University's involvement with events - for example, opportunities to get involved with "hackathons" and tech talks
Last edited by winterscoming; 2 years ago
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BedfordMom
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A degree in Computing Science eg Bsc Computing Science is the same as a degree in Computer science. Some institutions prefer the more grammatically correct term, "Computing science" because "Computer" is not a science. "Computing" is, although traditionally it has always been called computer science. UEA for instance call theirs, Computing Science, whilst Sussex call theirs 'Computer', but its essentially the same course.

But as with any degree course, you need to now go through the course content of the various instituion with a fine toothcomb wether it be 'Computing or Computer science' to see what the differences in modules are to come to a decision.
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ccchimpo
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(Original post by winterscoming)
The general answer is that it depends upon the university; the title of a degree doesn't really tell you any anywhere near enough useful information - you need to read into the content of different courses at different universities, as well as the descriptions of the modules.

However, it's usually the case that 'Computing' is an umbrella term for a lot of different courses that a university offers. Computer Science tends to be a specific degree; sometimes it's a mathematical and theoretical degree if you end up studying at one of the 'top 20' universities. Other times it's a lot more vocational, and focuses on technical skills (which will include software engineering, but can also include other skills such as networking and hardware) -- the universities outside of the 'top-20' usually have more of this and a lot less maths/theory.

A lot of universities also offer specific degrees in Software Engineering (which is yet another 'type' of Computing course) - obviously those are deliberately aimed at people wishing to get into a software engineering career because it focuses on all the skills you'd need for that without other topics like networking/hardware.

Lastly it's sometimes possible to find generic "computing" degrees which have very few core/mandatory modules, where students are given a lot more freedom and flexibility to pick and choose the a lot more modules from a range of options from the university's Computing module catalogue.

Also, make sure you look at other things too:
- Connections with employers and industry partners,
- Does the degree include an industrial placement option (industrial placements are really valuable for your employability prospects)
- Any options to work towards industry-recognised certification as part of a degree, such as those from Microsoft/Oracle/Amazon/Cisco/etc.
- University's involvement with events - for example, opportunities to get involved with "hackathons" and tech talks
Oooh ok! Thank you so much for your help
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