Best way to learn languages? Watch

Ioneg
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I’m currently studying French and German at a level and am thinking of studying french and linguistics, French and German, French and ab initio Spanish or French and ab initio Italian at university. (Or a combination of three languages)
I want to learn as many languages as possible. Is going to university the best easy to do this?

Thanks
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
cheesecakelove
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Ioneg)
I’m currently studying French and German at a level and am thinking of studying french and linguistics, French and German, French and ab initio Spanish or French and ab initio Italian at university. (Or a combination of three languages)
I want to learn as many languages as possible. Is going to university the best easy to do this?

Thanks
I would select the language you are most interested in. Studying French at university takes an academic approach to the language, as well as other elements such as culture and history. If you are still interested in learning other languages, you could self-teach or some universities run additional language classes which might be worth looking into. I find the best way to speak a language like a native speaker (rather than in an academic way) is to immerse yourself in the language - talking to people who speak the language, visiting the country, listening to music or watching TV. You may wish to join the relative societies at university too!
0
reply
iodo345
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Graduating from university n a language doesn't even mean you are fluent in it. You need to spend time in the country interacting with natives to do that.
0
reply
mr_carrot
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by iodo345)
Graduating from university n a language doesn't even mean you are fluent in it. You need to spend time in the country interacting with natives to do that.
Of course it does . . . unless you go to a terrible university, graduates of European languages should have near-native proficiency (CEFR C1/C2). Foreign languages degrees do involve a year abroad either studying at a partner university or undertaking a work placement. This fluency comes alongside academic study of the history, literature, culture of the country so it is like a history/language/literature degree in one. Even for non-European languages, like Chinese and Japanese, students from good universities do graduate with advanced proficiency in the language. You can even study Classical Chinese and Japanese as part of an undergraduate programme.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

How old were you when you first saw porn?

I've never seen it (117)
21.59%
Before I was 12 (183)
33.76%
13 (85)
15.68%
14 (63)
11.62%
15 (38)
7.01%
16 (16)
2.95%
17 (6)
1.11%
18 (5)
0.92%
Between the ages of 19 - 24 (6)
1.11%
Over 25 (1)
0.18%
12 (22)
4.06%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise