English essay help Watch

kathrynkennett
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I’m not sure if this is the right forum to post this in, so I’m sorry if it’s not. I’m doing A-Level Edexcel English Lit Poems of the Decade and my question is ‘How does ‘From the Journal of a Disappointed Man’ and ‘Out of the Bag’ present their ideas on perception vs reality?’. I’m completely stuck on it.
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Jess Chan
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I’m actually doing the same spec and I’ve done those poems so I’m happy to help
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Jess Chan
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Do you have any ideas you want to develop already? If not, I’ll get my copies and help brainstorm. The poetry unit is my favourite and I intend to study English at uni so it wouldn’t be any trouble
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kathrynkennett
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(Original post by Jess Chan)
Do you have any ideas you want to develop already? If not, I’ll get my copies and help brainstorm. The poetry unit is my favourite and I intend to study English at uni so it wouldn’t be any trouble
I’ve got a point on the way they perceive those in different classes to them, but that’s all I have. I’d really appreciate the help, thank you!
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Jess Chan
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So for Heaney, I would discuss:
• the speaker’s perception of how he and his siblings came about is described through the use of images of magic and childish wonder: ‘like a hypnotist/Unwinding is, he’d wind the instruments/Back into their lining’ - in the simile you get a sense of the power of a child to create whole magical world through the imagination which is something we lose as adults; the creative energy is celebrated in this poem but seems to diminish as we grow.
• Idea of magic also shown in speaker’s description of Kerlin: ‘Hyperborean, beyond-the-north wind blue’ (about his eyes)
• Could suggest how speaker’s perception as a child is limited because he frequently describes events through his senses: ‘fur-lined leather coat...spaniel-coloured’, ‘Those most, rosy, big soft hands of his’.
• Or maybe you get a sense of his childlike view of the world and it feels overwhelming because he has a lack of knowledge.
•The first section of the poem is the longest section and because it focuses on the speaker’s childhood, this suggests it has the biggest impact on the speaker - further suggested by the reference to Dr Kerlin in the 2nd section when the speaker is an adult.
• in part 2, perception is shown in the classical references because it shows the speaker’s perception is widening; note how part 1 was focused on the home as its setting. Now it’s talking about historical places in Greece - the world in his mind is expanding.
• in this section, speaker is also utilising his wisdom to view the world and his language becomes more sophisticated, e.g use of Latin.
• part 2 ideas extended in part 3
• part 4 speaker is exposed to reality in his mother’s death - not something he has previously experienced because of his limited worldview.
• Full stop after ‘deaths’ highlights finality of death - life is not the romanticised concept he believed it to be in part 1.
• contrast what speaker sees and what is real all throughout.
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Jess Chan
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Let me know if any of that needs clarifying
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Jess Chan
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When’s your essay in for? I have history now but I can help with the other poem in my break
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by Jess Chan)
So for Heaney, I would discuss:
• the speaker’s perception of how he and his siblings came about is described through the use of images of magic and childish wonder: ‘like a hypnotist/Unwinding is, he’d wind the instruments/Back into their lining’ - in the simile you get a sense of the power of a child to create whole magical world through the imagination which is something we lose as adults; the creative energy is celebrated in this poem but seems to diminish as we grow.
• Idea of magic also shown in speaker’s description of Kerlin: ‘Hyperborean, beyond-the-north wind blue’ (about his eyes)
• Could suggest how speaker’s perception as a child is limited because he frequently describes events through his senses: ‘fur-lined leather coat...spaniel-coloured’, ‘Those most, rosy, big soft hands of his’.
• Or maybe you get a sense of his childlike view of the world and it feels overwhelming because he has a lack of knowledge.
•The first section of the poem is the longest section and because it focuses on the speaker’s childhood, this suggests it has the biggest impact on the speaker - further suggested by the reference to Dr Kerlin in the 2nd section when the speaker is an adult.
• in part 2, perception is shown in the classical references because it shows the speaker’s perception is widening; note how part 1 was focused on the home as its setting. Now it’s talking about historical places in Greece - the world in his mind is expanding.
• in this section, speaker is also utilising his wisdom to view the world and his language becomes more sophisticated, e.g use of Latin.
• part 2 ideas extended in part 3
• part 4 speaker is exposed to reality in his mother’s death - not something he has previously experienced because of his limited worldview.
• Full stop after ‘deaths’ highlights finality of death - life is not the romanticised concept he believed it to be in part 1.
• contrast what speaker sees and what is real all throughout.
That's an impressive answer. You have my upvote man.
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kathrynkennett
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(Original post by Jess Chan)
So for Heaney, I would discuss:
• the speaker’s perception of how he and his siblings came about is described through the use of images of magic and childish wonder: ‘like a hypnotist/Unwinding is, he’d wind the instruments/Back into their lining’ - in the simile you get a sense of the power of a child to create whole magical world through the imagination which is something we lose as adults; the creative energy is celebrated in this poem but seems to diminish as we grow.
• Idea of magic also shown in speaker’s description of Kerlin: ‘Hyperborean, beyond-the-north wind blue’ (about his eyes)
• Could suggest how speaker’s perception as a child is limited because he frequently describes events through his senses: ‘fur-lined leather coat...spaniel-coloured’, ‘Those most, rosy, big soft hands of his’.
• Or maybe you get a sense of his childlike view of the world and it feels overwhelming because he has a lack of knowledge.
•The first section of the poem is the longest section and because it focuses on the speaker’s childhood, this suggests it has the biggest impact on the speaker - further suggested by the reference to Dr Kerlin in the 2nd section when the speaker is an adult.
• in part 2, perception is shown in the classical references because it shows the speaker’s perception is widening; note how part 1 was focused on the home as its setting. Now it’s talking about historical places in Greece - the world in his mind is expanding.
• in this section, speaker is also utilising his wisdom to view the world and his language becomes more sophisticated, e.g use of Latin.
• part 2 ideas extended in part 3
• part 4 speaker is exposed to reality in his mother’s death - not something he has previously experienced because of his limited worldview.
• Full stop after ‘deaths’ highlights finality of death - life is not the romanticised concept he believed it to be in part 1.
• contrast what speaker sees and what is real all throughout.
Wow, thank you so so much!! It’s due in tomorrow so I have a little time.
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Jess Chan
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okay back now. sorry I got caught up with some work before but I can help now
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Jess Chan
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For Motion's poem:
I would talk about...
- how the men appear (physically) intimidating + they have a massive presence but their efforts are rendered futile because they fail to erect the pole (my English teacher gave us a Freudian analysis of this, saying that this inability may be an indication of impotence and the male anxiety about being emasculated in the modern world).
- There's a surprising lack of action in the poem even though the men appear capable of their work; their physicality, however, proves futile - perhaps the speaker adopts a mocking tone? (I could tell.../these men were up against a great difficulty'.
-The rigidity of the stanzas (quatrains) might further highlight this; it gives the impression of reliability + unpredictability (characteristics some [probably just men though ] may associate with masculinity) - perceptions of their own strength vs the feasibility of the task.
- Motif of being an outsider (but the speaker seems happy to be so - he associates the workers as 'monsters' and this language conveys how uncivilised they appear to him; they don't communicate but work in 'silence' and 'still saying nothing' [humanity vs civilisation]); think about why he uses figurative language to describe the workers in such unfavourable terms because this poem is mostly literal so it's important to consider why Motion uses, e.g. similes ('like a mystic into the water') when he does.
- The speaker vs the workers: the speaker observes them from a distance and seems to reject their efforts ('for all their strength')
- In comparison to the workers, the speaker seems the one who is more articulate but actually even to him, language is (ironically) limited and he doesn't know what his difficulty is whilst the workers know theirs: 'I cannot say what'.
- The ending reinforces the distance between the speaker + workers: 'That left/the pile still in mid-air, and me of course' - the use of medial caesurae again shows us that the speaker is opposed to the workers.
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