PTCS
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Damn, I am looking at that DataScience from UoL / Goldsmiths and it is more in line with what I actually want

Not sure tho as York is prestigious and I cn supplement statistics and Data work as portfolio pieces

Mmh
(Original post by sedah)
I do not think that everything is bad either. But I know what I need.

After consultation with the University of Glasgow, this study has unfortunately been dropped, because it is very intense statistics and mathematics, which I would like, but I would have to be three years younger.

My decision now lies between UoL - Data Science & FT and Du Montfort University - Data Analytics.

With Data Analytics, the only question is whether Python is taught. I am waiting for an answer. The program is ranked 4th (Subject Ranking). I do not like that York indicates that the study is completed online / distannce learning. As if their program is not worth a lot.
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username4816544
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The UoL is indeed the best one (for me too). It combines all the thinks i am searching for.

I am waiting for an answer from northumbria, huddersfield and napier. They are offering those programms to. DMU seems to be good to, but it doesn't cover all the topics.
(Original post by PTCS)
Damn, I am looking at that DataScience from UoL / Goldsmiths and it is more in line with what I actually want

Not sure tho as York is prestigious and I cn supplement statistics and Data work as portfolio pieces

Mmh
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dishes
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For those on the course already - are you having to set up your development environment locally, or do they provide access to virtual machines for you to use?
Can anyone comment on what the exams are like as well, how are these completed?Thanks!
Last edited by dishes; 1 year ago
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TWorthy91
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From what I gathered there are two modules on ML specifically, which, combined with the statistics modules, will be a very thorough coverage of algorithms and data structures, it just doesnt have a set module titled as such like York. I'm a bit worried about trying to cram it all into 2 years though after what the course leader said haha.
(Original post by Yourmainmancj)
Glasgow’s course looks sweet, I think the mistake that people make with York’s MSc is that they think it’s a data science degree. That’s what I thought at the beginning but actually it’s basically just a normal computer science degree with a focus on machine learning and data mining. The problem that I see with Glasgow is that there is no module that focuses on algorithms and data structures, if you want to progress into serious AI you really need a strong get grasp of algorithm theory, it’s pretty much the most important module in the york msc imo.
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PTCS
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(Original post by sedah)
The UoL is indeed the best one (for me too). It combines all the thinks i am searching for.

I am waiting for an answer from northumbria, huddersfield and napier. They are offering those programms to. DMU seems to be good to, but it doesn't cover all the topics.
Well maybe, then again I think a strong algo foundation goes a long ways and I can pick up more specific DS topics via udacity, Dataquest and Coursera

I have been teaching myself Python, R doing IBM data science path and Introduction to statistical learning with Stanford Online and already working on some portfolio pieces like weather prediction using python random forest and other ideas..


I also recommend codesignal which has some good interview prep questions
Last edited by PTCS; 1 year ago
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Swainub
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They mention in the introduction that the programme is quite flexible and you can take breaks between modules if you need to balance other commitments. There's a maximum of 6 study breaks over the course of the programme, and 2 consecutively.
(Original post by _wagner_)
Hi guys, I am interested in starting the Msc in September. I have had an exchange of emails with the university and scrolled through this thread but there's one thing that is unclear about the course structure. Can some time elapse between one module and the other? Will I be able to, say, complete the first module, wait a couple of months then start the second one? I will be working a fairly demanding job in a few months and I am not sure I can commit the 19+ hours p/w needed (also considering that I do not have a CS background). Does anyone know anything about this/ is anyone in the same situation? I apologise if this has already been covered but I did not have the time to read through the whole thread. Thanks
Last edited by Swainub; 1 year ago
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Edtao3000
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I don't think a graduate recruitment scheme would be able to tell the difference as they just focus on the reputation of the university.

If you have Oxford, Cambridge or Imperial on your CV, I think people will take a second look, regardless if the degree was done online or on campus, or even if it is relevant. The reputation of the university and the level of the degree you get help to make your CV standout and hopefully get you an interview. Relevant experience, however, will always trump education.

The truth is, you don't need any qualification to do most jobs, but employers have to discriminate somehow. Filtering by education level is one way.

Sure you might belittle the degree, but if there are 2 CVs and one has a masters degree on it and another doesn't and all else is the same, the one with the masters degree is always going to make a better impression. When you become senior one day and have to hire people, you will see this.

Wouldn't it be annoying to know that all the jobs you lost may have been down to someone just having an extra line on their CV, or because they have a better university on their CV than you?
(Original post by Shoegazer92)
Not trying to upset people but having worked as a software developer for some years, and now moving into this area myself, I get the impression a lot of employers (in the UK at least) do not respect a distance learning program at all, like it counts for nothing, not worth the paper it's written on even if it's reputable university. Some employers might actually value it but it's still not respected as much as actually attending the university in person.

I think it's very wrong of them to be like this because the students are probably just as capable, since it takes more dedication to do distance learning alongside other commitments.

not trying to scare or upset people but just giving my honest view based on my experiences talking with recruiters and applying for jobs/going for interviews myself...
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Edtao3000
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You can certainly learn all of the content on the course for free as it is probably easily available on the internet. It's just like those lectures from MIT - they are as good as if you had attended. However, those who attended and passed have a degree. What do you have?

You might know the subject inside out, better than a Phd from Oxford. You could be the real-life Will Hunting. The part you are missing is that if you were that good, you would already have the Phd, you would already be the real-life Will Hunting.
(Original post by Swainub)
So I'm approaching the end of the first week of the course and am highly considering leaving the program. It seems to me that the method of teaching is dictating from a textbook and setting tasks from said textbook. This is fair enough, but I feel like there are far more effective, efficient and cheaper ways of learning than this.
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username1184600
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I agree that some sort of Msc is better than none for sure, and if distance learning is a person's only option then go for it.

But if you have a choice it would be better to attend in person. A distance Msc might persuade a potential employer into giving you the interview over the next person but if then in the interview they are drilling down in more detail about what the degree was, they could be one of these people who just discounts the distance courses altogether. I suppose not all of them would do that though (if I was doing the hiring I would consider it equivalent).

you're also right about relevant experience, although while that does usually win the job in that specific field, the problem with relevant experience is that too is often discounted if you were looking to change career or sectors, or as many software developers may find out, even if you try to change languages you work with (e.g if your first job is using SAS and VB, most people will struggle finding job #2 if they want to move to say Python and R based development). The same logic also applies to jobs which are "entry level" and don't require much qualification, good for building experience but too often the experience isn't transferable and that "entry level job" turns out to be a "dead end job". So it's better to have the degree and then the experience really, if that's also a consideration for some people.

sorry if this is a bit of a ramble, it's not really targeted at just your response but my thoughts in general at the outcome of these distance courses and employment in IT jobs as a whole. I'm just throwing this out there as there seems to be a lot of people looking at moving careers and stuff and potentially investing a lot of time/effort/money into this so I feel like I should share my experience where I can.

(Original post by Edtao3000)
I don't think a graduate recruitment scheme would be able to tell the difference as they just focus on the reputation of the university.

If you have Oxford, Cambridge or Imperial on your CV, I think people will take a second look, regardless if the degree was done online or on campus, or even if it is relevant. The reputation of the university and the level of the degree you get help to make your CV standout and hopefully get you an interview. Relevant experience, however, will always trump education.

The truth is, you don't need any qualification to do most jobs, but employers have to discriminate somehow. Filtering by education level is one way.

Sure you might belittle the degree, but if there are 2 CVs and one has a masters degree on it and another doesn't and all else is the same, the one with the masters degree is always going to make a better impression. When you become senior one day and have to hire people, you will see this.

Wouldn't it be annoying to know that all the jobs you lost may have been down to someone just having an extra line on their CV, or because they have a better university on their CV than you?
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_wagner_
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I see. That seems fair, thank you Sir. Do you also happen to know how long each break is?
(Original post by Swainub)
They mention in the introduction that the programme is quite flexible and you can take breaks between modules if you need to balance other commitments. There's a maximum of 6 study breaks over the course of the programme, and 2 consecutively.
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CristianData
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Hi ancient_queen,What free online programming courses have you done, are they focused on teaching Java?
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kickstander
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join us at: htt ps://dis cord.gg/X SZ zkfG

Currently 16 members and GROWING!
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CommKat
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Hi everyone, I recently found this MSc and am interested in starting in Oct. For those already on it, can I ask about the pace of the course. I understand that I am likely to need at least 15-20 hrs per week, but is there flexibility to do (for example) more one week and get ahead if you have less time the following week, or vice versa less one week and catch up the next?I ask as I work shifts so I can be doing 6 or 7 days in one 'calendar week' (including late and night shifts) but then have a week only working 3 days. I have studied with the Open University for the last 10yrs or so, so I am used to self study and meeting deadlines but I do need this flexibility. If this course is too rigid as in 'study this on this day' I may struggle with my shift pattern.TIA for any input
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Yourmainmancj
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The course is really good so far, the pacing is quite fast and there is a lot of content in the modules. I would strongly recommend completing the readings in the week they are assigned as even though each module is 15 credits the amount of content on an individual module feels more like that of a 30 credit module
(Original post by CommKat)
Hi everyone, I recently found this MSc and am interested in starting in Oct. For those already on it, can I ask about the pace of the course. I understand that I am likely to need at least 15-20 hrs per week, but is there flexibility to do (for example) more one week and get ahead if you have less time the following week, or vice versa less one week and catch up the next?I ask as I work shifts so I can be doing 6 or 7 days in one 'calendar week' (including late and night shifts) but then have a week only working 3 days. I have studied with the Open University for the last 10yrs or so, so I am used to self study and meeting deadlines but I do need this flexibility. If this course is too rigid as in 'study this on this day' I may struggle with my shift pattern.TIA for any input
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dishes
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(Original post by Yourmainmancj)
The course is really good so far, the pacing is quite fast and there is a lot of content in the modules. I would strongly recommend completing the readings in the week they are assigned as even though each module is 15 credits the amount of content on an individual module feels more like that of a 30 credit module
Thanks for posting this - how have you found it completing the assignments and exams so far?

I have taken a part-time uni course in the past, that was aimed at people juggling work, however they had lots of annoying things like putting essay deadlines on Fridays, so that you couldn't finish them over weekends etc. that made it hard to complete - just wondering if this course has been put together a bit more thoughtfully than that!
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Nikki Al 2019
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I believe you have access to virtual machines as well, but they encourage you to set up your environment locally and send you the necessary files to be working on via zipped files.

Exams were discussed earlier in this thread somewhere if you take a look you'll hopefully find it.
(Original post by dishes)
For those on the course already - are you having to set up your development environment locally, or do they provide access to virtual machines for you to use?
Can anyone comment on what the exams are like as well, how are these completed?Thanks!
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Nikki Al 2019
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Deadlines are on Mondays for this course!
(Original post by dishes)
Thanks for posting this - how have you found it completing the assignments and exams so far?

I have taken a part-time uni course in the past, that was aimed at people juggling work, however they had lots of annoying things like putting essay deadlines on Fridays, so that you couldn't finish them over weekends etc. that made it hard to complete - just wondering if this course has been put together a bit more thoughtfully than that!
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Nikki Al 2019
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In one way it's good but in another way I'm finding BilalAshraf's comments from earlier are true - the way the material is presented is not friendly at all compared to some online resources for coding, not much explanation at all, even in the labs...
(Original post by Yourmainmancj)
The course is really good so far, the pacing is quite fast and there is a lot of content in the modules. I would strongly recommend completing the readings in the week they are assigned as even though each module is 15 credits the amount of content on an individual module feels more like that of a 30 credit module
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Nikki Al 2019
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In my opinion, this would possibly work for your shift pattern. People are going at different paces on the course, some people are still on week 1 content though it's mid-week 2, so you 'could' do it, however it's early days yet and I'm not sure how this would be later.

Also useful info for you is that the assignment deadlines are every 2 weeks, so if you're confident to be able to do them in one week you'd be okay, but again, it depends on how you find it.
(Original post by CommKat)
Hi everyone, I recently found this MSc and am interested in starting in Oct. For those already on it, can I ask about the pace of the course. I understand that I am likely to need at least 15-20 hrs per week, but is there flexibility to do (for example) more one week and get ahead if you have less time the following week, or vice versa less one week and catch up the next?I ask as I work shifts so I can be doing 6 or 7 days in one 'calendar week' (including late and night shifts) but then have a week only working 3 days. I have studied with the Open University for the last 10yrs or so, so I am used to self study and meeting deadlines but I do need this flexibility. If this course is too rigid as in 'study this on this day' I may struggle with my shift pattern.TIA for any input
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Yourmainmancj
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I’ve not actually done the exam yet but for the assignments the answers are pretty much in the reading and they are always due on Monday which means that you have the weekend for them
(Original post by dishes)
Thanks for posting this - how have you found it completing the assignments and exams so far?

I have taken a part-time uni course in the past, that was aimed at people juggling work, however they had lots of annoying things like putting essay deadlines on Fridays, so that you couldn't finish them over weekends etc. that made it hard to complete - just wondering if this course has been put together a bit more thoughtfully than that!
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