How will my sister (22) ever move out of our parents house? Any ideas? Watch

geniusiq139
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
My sister is 22 years old. She graduated university in 2018 and came back to live with our parents. Her degree was not the best (fashion marketing) and she also lacks motivation to do good things. She’s worked part-time at a shop for the past 6 months, and she doesn’t seem like she going into anything better. She can’t afford to pay rent on her own.

But the other thing is. She’s really ugly and she has anger management issues, so she’s never had a boyfriend at 22. For her to move out it would only be possible if she did. Because then she could afford to split rent if she worked full time and she wouldn’t be lonely having moved out. It doesn’t look like she’s ever going to get a boyfriend though.

How is she ever going to move out of our parents house and live independently? Any ideas?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
bones-mccoy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
Why is it any of your business? She's your sister, if your parents are happy with her living at home then there's no problem.

I'm a good few years older than your sister and most of the friends I went to school and uni with still live at home. Rent is too expensive and decent paying jobs are too scarce. There's no right or wrong time to move out but a lot of teenagers and older people don't seem to realise that, it's only those people in the middle who have graduated uni and are actually living those lives that realise how difficult finding and affording a place of your own is.

Not sure what the relevance of her never having a boyfriend has got to do with anything?
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 1 week ago
3
reply
geniusiq139
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
It’s because if you have a significant other then it makes paying rent or getting a mortgage a lot more affordable. I’m just worried because she seems to lack independence or the ability to be independent and to be supported by anyone other than her parents.

She refuses to even get a full time job or search for job opportunities that go beyond minimum wage even though she has a degree. I just think it’s sad to still be dependant even when you are an adult with expertise (a university degree).

It’s just my view. I think she should strive to have a life of her own.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
bones-mccoy
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by geniusiq139)
It’s because if you have a significant other then it makes paying rent or getting a mortgage a lot more affordable. I’m just worried because she seems to lack independence or the ability to be independent and to be supported by anyone other than her parents.

She refuses to even get a full time job or search for job opportunities that go beyond minimum wage even though she has a degree. I just think it’s sad to still be dependant even when you are an adult with expertise (a university degree).

It’s just my view. I think she should strive to have a life of her own.
That's true but both you and your partner would have to be earning enough to get a mortage or pay the rent.

22 is still young. People move at their own pace, there's no set rule to say you should move out at X age or be earning X amount at X age. The reality is that a lot of people are still supported by their parents at 22 and a lot older. That's just how it is but there's nothing inherently wrong with that.

Unfortunately gradating uni doesn't mean so much these days with the current job market and amount of competition around, the amount of uni graduates working in retail or hospitality is quite high until they get the required experience or a foot in the door. A lot of uni courses don't prepare you for the real world and that's something that some people seem to struggle with, realising that you don't just walk out of uni and into a job. Maybe when you're older and in that position yourself you'll understand.
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 1 week ago
1
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
sounds like she is best off with your parents.

She doesn't sound ready or capabale of managing on her own - so its probably best she stays at home for now.

Just encourage her into dating softly and gently, and if she gets a man, then everything will start to click into place gradually. Get her out meeting people, involve her in your social life if you have to - help her with online dating etc.

My sister was living at home this time last year - as she didn't have a boyfriend, and it was by far the best thing for her. Much better there rather than paying crazy high rents, feeling lonley, etc. away from her family. She tried online dating for a few years, and last summer she met a guy, now she has moved out, and her life is ticking on again. There was nothing wrong with her living at home agian during that time, it just takes a bit of sorting out and encouragement.
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do unconditional offers make teenagers lazy?

Yes (237)
59.85%
No (159)
40.15%

Watched Threads

View All