B1461 - Monarchy (Secularism) Bill 2019 Watch

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CatusStarbright
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B1461 - Monarchy (Secularism) Bill 2019, TSR Labour Party



Monarchy Bill (Secularism) Bill 2019

An Act to allow the monarch to be any religion they desire, and to avoid future constitutional issues that may arise.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—


1. Royal religious freedoms.
(1) That there shall be no restrictions on what religion the monarch or any of the royal family choose to be.

2. Supreme Governor of the Church of England
(1) The monarch will cease to be automatically made the Supreme Governor of the Church of England; however
(2) If Accepted by the reigning monarch and the leader of the Church of England this role can be granted to the monarch on a ceremonial basis.

3. Commencement, Short Title and Extent
(1) This bill shall come into force on 6th April 2022.
(2) This bill may be cited as the Monarchy (Secularism) Act 2019.
(3) This bill extends to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

NotesMr Speaker, The TSR Labour Party recognises the contribution that our Monarchy makes to the UK, while also accepting that legislation concerning the monarchy has failed to keep up with the role that the royal family play in modern Britain. While the argument that if you were designing a democracy from scratch you would not create a monarchy is true, TSR Labour recognises that History shows how hard it is to create a democracy from scratch and recognise the stability our tradition gives to our democracy.

Mr Speaker, today we bring forth this bill with the hopes of modernising parts of the British Monarchy to allow it to continue to be compatible with the role it will play in the 21st century.

2. This is partly just to make us more secular (as it's a ceremonial role anyway), however, it also helps avoid a potential minor constitutional crisis in the future. As the Succession to the Crown Act 2013 allows for Catholics to take the thrown, the current situation could result in a Catholic monarch being forced to become Governor of the Church of England. The status quo would be able to continue, as long as both the monarch and the CoE agreed.


Second ReadingMr Speaker, this Bill represents the third part of our original Monarchy bill. We have already explained our reasons for splitting this during the second reading of that bill, so we will not go over that again.

As was pointed out by JD when this was debated last, the monarch cannot currently be a Catholic, the Succession Act 2015 merely allows for the monarch to marry a royal. For the reasons explained below the TSR Labour party feels that this is perhaps even worse than the previous rule, and thus we have added a section to amend that.

1. The TSR Labour party believes in a secular Britain, and thus that the requirement for a monarch to not be Catholic to be against our national ideas. Further, the allowance for a monarch to marry a Catholic creates further problems due to a Catholics religious obligation to raise their children Catholic. We believe that the easiest way to avoid problems is to simply remove the role of religion from the process.
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Jammy Duel
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Turning one cocked up bad bill into three bills doesn't make them any better, it just means there are three bad bills instead of one.
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LemonBotex
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So who decides the head of the Church of England then? No framework for that decision in this legislation.

Nay
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ns_2
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Nay.

Although I would be willing to accomdate the religious freedoms, I do not see the point of this - badly executed - bill; notably, there is no 'definition' for Leader of the CofE: the 'leading' official of the CofE is the monarch.

The highest other offical is the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.
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Jarred
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I agree that there needs to be some very light framework (2 or 3 lines) regarding how the leader of the church is designated before I can support it
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DayneD89
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(Original post by LemonBotex)
So who decides the head of the Church of England then? No framework for that decision in this legislation.

Nay
That was deliberate, as we don't think parliament should be telling the church who governs it. As a ceremonial role with and power it does have being exercised through parliament anyway it would be up to the CoE if they wanted anyone in that role at all if they or the monarch declined the title going to the monarch.
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The Champion.m4a
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Despite being a member of The Church of England myself, who has attended mass at least once in the past year, I have always supported the disestablishment of the CofE in England.

It's my view that the arrangement is not only meaningless to the country, but is gravely damaging to the Church itself. His Grace The Archbishop has no solid power, and the Supreme-Governor refrains from using hers. As it stands, the Church hardly stands for anything, and the "views" and teachings are highly dependent on which church you attend, at least one ran by an Anglican priest who publicly proclaims his atheism.

The Church has always nominated two candidates to the Supreme-Governor, one of whom being an obviously questionable choice. I'm sure they can very easily just elect their own head on their own, just like the church in Rome has for millennia with their elective absolute monarchy.

I don't really oppose to any part of the bill, except that it does nothing. It doesn't really disestablish it, nor does it touch on the most important issue - the existence of spiritual lords in our House of Peers.
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thestudent33
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)


Monarchy Bill (Secularism) Bill 2019

An Act to allow the monarch to be any religion they desire, and to avoid future constitutional issues that may arise.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—


[field defaultattr=]1. Royal religious freedoms.
(1) That there shall be no restrictions on what religion the monarch or any of the royal family choose to be.

2. Supreme Governor of the Church of England
(1) The monarch will cease to be automatically made the Supreme Governor of the Church of England; however
(2) If Accepted by the reigning monarch and the leader of the Church of England this role can be granted to the monarch on a ceremonial basis.

3. Commencement, Short Title and Extent
(1) This bill shall come into force on 6th April 2022.
(2) This bill may be cited as the Monarchy (Secularism) Act 2019.
(3) This bill extends to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

NotesMr Speaker, The TSR Labour Party recognises the contribution that our Monarchy makes to the UK, while also accepting that legislation concerning the monarchy has failed to keep up with the role that the royal family play in modern Britain. While the argument that if you were designing a democracy from scratch you would not create a monarchy is true, TSR Labour recognises that History shows how hard it is to create a democracy from scratch and recognise the stability our tradition gives to our democracy.

Mr Speaker, today we bring forth this bill with the hopes of modernising parts of the British Monarchy to allow it to continue to be compatible with the role it will play in the 21st century.

2. This is partly just to make us more secular (as it's a ceremonial role anyway), however, it also helps avoid a potential minor constitutional crisis in the future. As the Succession to the Crown Act 2013 allows for Catholics to take the thrown, the current situation could result in a Catholic monarch being forced to become Governor of the Church of England. The status quo would be able to continue, as long as both the monarch and the CoE agreed.



Second ReadingMr Speaker, this Bill represents the third part of our original Monarchy bill. We have already explained our reasons for splitting this during the second reading of that bill, so we will not go over that again.

As was pointed out by JD when this was debated last, the monarch cannot currently be a Catholic, the Succession Act 2015 merely allows for the monarch to marry a royal. For the reasons explained below the TSR Labour party feels that this is perhaps even worse than the previous rule, and thus we have added a section to amend that.

1. The TSR Labour party believes in a secular Britain, and thus that the requirement for a monarch to not be Catholic to be against our national ideas. Further, the allowance for a monarch to marry a Catholic creates further problems due to a Catholics religious obligation to raise their children Catholic. We believe that the easiest way to avoid problems is to simply remove the role of religion from the process.

[/field]
Seems fair.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by thestudent33)
Seems fair.
Well it is your own party's bill.
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thestudent33
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
Well it is your own party's bill.
I felt the need to comment something...
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by thestudent33)
I felt the need to comment something...
Haha I see.
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Rakas21
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I would potentially be open to an amendment to this bill outlining that the monarch remains the head of the church of England only unless she is of another faith (though i would potentially seek to prohibit some foreign religion like Islam) however as it stands the opportunity not to have the monarch be head of the church of england will grant an opportunity to those who seek to betray our history.

Very likely a Nay.
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Andrew97
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Nay. For reasons expressed above.
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DSutch
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(Original post by LemonBotex)
So who decides the head of the Church of England then? No framework for that decision in this legislation.

Nay
Bishops perhaps? The General Synod?
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04MR17
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(Original post by LemonBotex)
So who decides the head of the Church of England then? No framework for that decision in this legislation.

Nay
This.

I hope the Labour party produces a second reading for this item.
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ns_2
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(Original post by LemonBotex)
So who decides the head of the Church of England then? No framework for that decision in this legislation.

Nay
I assume they mean the Archbishop of Canterbury who is colloquially the 'leader of the CofE' - though this cannot be left undefined.
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Saracen's Fez
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This bill is in cessation.
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Saracen's Fez
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Division! Clear the lobbies!
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