mushroom1234
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hello, I want learn computer science and programming by myself (I am in grade 12 now) but I don’t have any background or knowledge in computer science. I want to apply for computer science next year in university. Does anybody know any good resources books ,online programs etc? (For complete beginners ) I don’t mind paying for it I recently started Code academy which was helpful but I am looking for more)))))
0
reply
winterscoming
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
I'm guessing you were working through Python if you started codecademy?

You could carry on with Python using some of these:
https://www.py4e.com/
https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electric...hon-fall-2016/
http://greenteapress.com/wp/think-python-2e/
https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html
https://pythonforbiologists.com/29-c...s-on-one-page/
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...72C720775B213E

Alternatively for something which goes into a lot more depth about computer science (and uses the 'C' programming language instead), have a look at Harvard's free online courses:
https://online-learning.harvard.edu/...mputer-science
CS50 is more than just a programming course - it covers a lot of basic material about computer science, problem solving, computational thinking, and some other CompSci theory -- it's definitely more challenging than just learning to program in Python, but might be a really good way to spend some time if you want to dive further into CompSci.

Websites like EdX, Coursera and Udacity also have tonnes of free course content on all kinds of programming and compsci topics. Everything on EdX and Coursera has an "audit" option, which lets you bypass the paid certificate and unlock course material for free - most of it from global top universities and top tech companies.

Also, StackOverflow is a real goldmine of information: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/python
(But, before actually asking a question on StackOverflow be really careful that you understand the rules/expectations of the site -- writing a good question on StackOverflow takes some effort!)


On programming specifically, a great way to practice and improve your skills is to set yourself the target of building something with the programming language. e.g. a web app or a game; larger non-trivial projects test your programming/problem solving skills as well as your ability to work with more complex things and to see how well you can organise/structure code to avoid it turning into a "big ball of mud" (common term to describe some really huge project which has sprawled out of control and turns into a kind of spaghetti mess). That can lead to topics such as 'OO' or other programming paradigms, as well as various topics around software engineering/design.
Last edited by winterscoming; 1 year ago
2
reply
mushroom1234
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by winterscoming)
I'm guessing you were working through Python if you started codecademy?

You could carry on with Python using some of these:
https://www.py4e.com/
https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electric...hon-fall-2016/
http://greenteapress.com/wp/think-python-2e/
https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html
https://pythonforbiologists.com/29-c...s-on-one-page/
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...72C720775B213E

Alternatively for something which goes into a lot more depth about computer science (and uses the 'C' programming language instead), have a look at Harvard's free online courses:
https://online-learning.harvard.edu/...mputer-science
CS50 is more than just a programming course - it covers a lot of basic material about computer science, problem solving, computational thinking, and some other CompSci theory -- it's definitely more challenging than just learning to program in Python, but might be a really good way to spend some time if you want to dive further into CompSci.

Websites like EdX, Coursera and Udacity also have tonnes of free course content on all kinds of programming and compsci topics.

Also, StackOverflow is a real goldmine of information: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/python
(But, before actually asking a question on StackOverflow be really careful that you understand the rules/expectations of the site -- writing a good question on StackOverflow takes some effort!)


On programming specifically, a great way to practice and improve your skills is to set yourself the target of building something with the programming language. e.g. a web app or a game; larger non-trivial projects test your programming/problem solving skills as well as your ability to work with more complex things and to see how well you can organise/structure code to avoid it turning into a "big ball of mud" (common term to describe some really huge project which has sprawled out of control and turns into a kind of spaghetti mess). That can lead to topics such as 'OO' or other programming paradigms, as well as various topics around software engineering/design.
Thank you very much))) I will definitely check those resources )))
0
reply
FFB6C1
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I'd recommend taking a look at Codecademy's Data Science courses. I know that several of the Computing Science degrees are now including modules focused on data science. If you can gather a basic understanding of SQL this will be very helpful during a computing sciences degree and also in programming. You will find that Python and SQL go hand in hand. Java is also taught in a lot of computing science degrees and I know Codecademy offer a course for that. It's also important to have an understanding of how a computer works, so think about hardware and networking. You won't really do anything networking related or at least not in great detail on any course I've seen but it's important to understand the basics of computing.

The CS50 Introduction course that winterscoming mentioned is a popular course and one that covers a few of the things I mentioned like Javascript and SQL. I'd recommend that if you feel like learning about those. It teaches you how to develop a programming project which is definitely something you will do at university.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Warwick
    Warwick Business School Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • St George's, University of London
    Postgrad open day Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (228)
67.66%
No (109)
32.34%

Watched Threads

View All