Do you feel people asking lots of questions In a convo awkward?

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Thanks
0
reply
14t
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks
usually sweet but not when it becomes an interrogation
1
reply
sotor
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
if theyre about me personally then not really

otherwise then yeah, it makes you feel like the other person is rlly listening to and its so much easier to break the ice and move on from small talk

one of my favourite people ive ever met does this and shes just so easy to get on with
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by sotor)
if theyre about me personally then not really

otherwise then yeah, it makes you feel like the other person is rlly listening to and its so much easier to break the ice and move on from small talk

one of my favourite people ive ever met does this and shes just so easy to get on with
Hmm. What do you mean by “if they’re not about you personally”? How indirectly about you personally can the question?

But yeah I mean the latter. Is your friend well liked then? And is this because of how well socially intelligent she is? Is that then a typical sign of charisma?
0
reply
londonmyst
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Sometimes.
It usually depends on the type of questions, whether they are spoken or shouted and if there is any aggression/unpleasantness/negative agenda.
Some people have a habit of asking a lot of questions because they have a lot of curiosity, low attention span or want to dominate the conversation on their own terms.
2
reply
Anonymous #1
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by londonmyst)
Sometimes.
It usually depends on the type of questions, whether they are spoken or shouted and if there is any aggression/unpleasantness/negative agenda.
Some people have a habit of asking a lot of questions because they have a lot of curiosity, low attention span or want to dominate the conversation on their own terms.
What’s bad about people wanting to dominate the conversation on their own terms especially if they possess good social skills?
0
reply
HateOCR
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks
No, i actually think it shows signs of interest. If you aren’t asking questions then how do you keep conversations going?
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by HateOCR)
No, i actually think it shows signs of interest. If you aren’t asking questions then how do you keep conversations going?
Well shouldn’t a conversation be a back and forth exchange of ‘questioner’ and ‘answerer’?
0
reply
londonmyst
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
What’s bad about people wanting to dominate the conversation on their own terms especially if they possess good social skills?
It can depend on the situation and agenda of the people involved.
A friendly conversation between two reasonable adults is supposed to be two way, with neither person trying to dominate.

Bullies, religious zealots and domestic abusers will often try to dominate a conversation to prove that they have all the power.
For example- a conversation with a jehovah's witnesses trying to convert you on your doorstep, after you say "no thanks I'm not interested".
Uusually involves: threats of hell, accusations of defying the almighty, questions about whether you are afraid of death/living in ignorance/evil.
0
reply
Old Skool Freak
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Anonymous)
What’s bad about people wanting to dominate the conversation on their own terms especially if they possess good social skills?
Because a pleasant conversation should be a two way thing, with each participant contributing an equal amount to the conversation dynamic. If one person is dominating the conversation, then it either becomes a lecture or a "shout-down".
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks
This is an interesting question, especially for those with anxiety.

Depends what they are asking?
Who is asking?
How they ask.?
Why they ask?

I would normally assess all those 4 factors. If it gets to the stage of awkward I would ask why.
If I felt they were off in any of those categories I would shut it down by deflection, refusal or challenge.
I never give out information I am uncomfortable with and I dont have to or wish to.
If someone was anxious then they should learn these techniques including how to be more assertive, how to read people, how to divert them and controlling a conversation.
0
reply
HateOCR
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Anonymous)
Well shouldn’t a conversation be a back and forth exchange of ‘questioner’ and ‘answerer’?
Not necessarily? If someone told me about their trip to like Spain i’d expect the conversation to revolve around them. It depends on the situation, its really hard to answer this thread question without a basis for me to elaborate on.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Anonymous)
What’s bad about people wanting to dominate the conversation on their own terms especially if they possess good social skills?
Dominating a conversation does not equate to good social skills, quite the opposite.
0
reply
Human_bean
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
Depends on the question. Things like ‘how much do you earn’ ‘what road do you live on’ ‘what’s your mothers maiden name’ - could fit into awkward category.

Things like ‘what do you think about (recent news article)’ etc = not annoying as it’s conversational, in a good way.
Last edited by Human_bean; 1 year ago
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#15
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by HateOCR)
Not necessarily? If someone told me about their trip to like Spain i’d expect the conversation to revolve around them. It depends on the situation, its really hard to answer this thread question without a basis for me to elaborate on.
If you revolve a conversation about yourself then surely it makes you narcissistic (not you personally)?
0
reply
HateOCR
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by Anonymous)
If you revolve a conversation about yourself then surely it makes you narcissistic (not you personally)?
It depends whether or not the person you’re talking to is interested. If they’re not and you are persistently talking about yourself then yes you probably are narcissistic
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#17
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by HateOCR)
It depends whether or not the person you’re talking to is interested. If they’re not and you are persistently talking about yourself then yes you probably are narcissistic
No that is wrong. A narcissist wouldn’t simply enter a conversation for the sake of not being interested
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (166)
14.6%
I'm not sure (52)
4.57%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (335)
29.46%
I have already dropped out (34)
2.99%
I'm not a current university student (550)
48.37%

Watched Threads

View All