Just got diagnosed with ADHD and Dyspraxia... Watch

definedancing
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...and I'm not sure how to process it!

I'm a 25-year-old woman studying Social Work, and in my first year. It never got picked up that I had SPLD at school, although they did note I was clumsy, awful at forgetting things, that kind of thing. I got advised to seek an assessment at college as they noticed my processing speed was poor, and did a dyslexia screening on me. I didn't see much point paying money for a diagnosis, but when I got to uni, it became apparent that I wouldn't get much support without one.

Anyway, the psychologist assessing me didn't think I had dyslexia as I did well on the majority of the comprehension and reading tests (and there were a lot), but said that he "noticed the ADHD within five minutes of speaking to me". In the big lengthy report sent to my uni, I have a diagnosis of ADHD and dyspraxia with some recommendations of how to cope with it.

I don't really know whether to feel relieved to get answers about how I feel, or angry that it didn't get picked up in school, or stressed about applying for DSA. How do people process this kind of thing?
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claireestelle
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(Original post by definedancing)
...and I'm not sure how to process it!

I'm a 25-year-old woman studying Social Work, and in my first year. It never got picked up that I had SPLD at school, although they did note I was clumsy, awful at forgetting things, that kind of thing. I got advised to seek an assessment at college as they noticed my processing speed was poor, and did a dyslexia screening on me. I didn't see much point paying money for a diagnosis, but when I got to uni, it became apparent that I wouldn't get much support without one.

Anyway, the psychologist assessing me didn't think I had dyslexia as I did well on the majority of the comprehension and reading tests (and there were a lot), but said that he "noticed the ADHD within five minutes of speaking to me". In the big lengthy report sent to my uni, I have a diagnosis of ADHD and dyspraxia with some recommendations of how to cope with it.

I don't really know whether to feel relieved to get answers about how I feel, or angry that it didn't get picked up in school, or stressed about applying for DSA. How do people process this kind of thing?
Hello, I m dyspraxic (was diagnosed at 10) but found out I had dyslexia on top at 18 and intitally I felt like "why do I have another thing wrong with me" bit then I thought I have always had both and it doesn't have to change anything. It doesn't have to change anything for you but knowledge is power and now you can work with your brain rather than against it and are legally entitled to help if you want it.
Now you have evidence DSA shouldn't be too bad to apply to, you can get equipment and software like speech to text and you can get study skills support (I had an hour a week with a tutor who helped me organise my studies and write essays).
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Petetyerman
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Late diagnosis of dyslexia dyspraxia and ADHD are not all that unusual it often depends on your overall ability . As the higher your ability to start with the better you are able to mask/compensate for the effects of the condition. It is often only as you reach higher levels of education in those people that the effect becomes enough to the condition to become clearly recognised. It takes a long time to come to terms with new knowledge how the act remember the actual condition has always been there and therefore you have not actually changed. All it is really happened is you've learnt the reason the things that previously you new a problem but didn't really understand why. There is a lot of support available that includes learning about how your brain works different from "normal " brain both the advantages and the disadvantages. Good one-to-one support is worth an awful lot in the time after identification and the course should give you extra time to deal with learning how to use support etc
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definedancing
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Hello, I m dyspraxic (was diagnosed at 10) but found out I had dyslexia on top at 18 and intitally I felt like "why do I have another thing wrong with me" bit then I thought I have always had both and it doesn't have to change anything. It doesn't have to change anything for you but knowledge is power and now you can work with your brain rather than against it and are legally entitled to help if you want it.
Now you have evidence DSA shouldn't be too bad to apply to, you can get equipment and software like speech to text and you can get study skills support (I had an hour a week with a tutor who helped me organise my studies and write essays).
That's interesting! I've applied for DSA and going to go from there, as you say, knowledge is power!

(Original post by Petetyerman)
Late diagnosis of dyslexia dyspraxia and ADHD are not all that unusual it often depends on your overall ability . As the higher your ability to start with the better you are able to mask/compensate for the effects of the condition. It is often only as you reach higher levels of education in those people that the effect becomes enough to the condition to become clearly recognised. It takes a long time to come to terms with new knowledge how the act remember the actual condition has always been there and therefore you have not actually changed. All it is really happened is you've learnt the reason the things that previously you new a problem but didn't really understand why. There is a lot of support available that includes learning about how your brain works different from "normal " brain both the advantages and the disadvantages. Good one-to-one support is worth an awful lot in the time after identification and the course should give you extra time to deal with learning how to use support etc
Well it was suspected I had Dyspraxia as a child but I never got a formal assessment because I was doing very well academically at the time. It wasn't until secondary school that I went from top of the class to middling, and finishing with B's and C's when everyone was telling me that 'I had the potential to be an A* student'. It is relieving to know that this is the norm for a lot of people like myself!
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carrie_b87
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It’s quite normal to be picked up later in life. I was diagnosed as dyslexic at 17, not on the basis of poor results or having any noticeable issues, rather the 6th form screened everyone! I’ve achieved a science degree from a Russell group uni and I’m a qualified teacher now. It’s actually benefitted my teaching as I have strategies of how to manage it and cope with it and can pass these of as exam techniques and revision tips to students! Honestly don’t feel like it is looked on as an issue, there really aren’t stigmas around these things anymore, it’s just we are better at diagnosing and supporting students than before.

When I taught on an Access/Foundation course at a uni we had students in their 30’s only just being diagnosed and we put support in. Most universities offer study tips courses which you’ll probably benefit from and things like extended library loans as well as the extra DSA support. There’s always student wellbeing too to chat through any concerns you ever have.

You’ll be just fine and now you’ll have extra support to help you be even more fab! All the best
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claireestelle
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(Original post by carrie_b87)
It’s quite normal to be picked up later in life. I was diagnosed as dyslexic at 17, not on the basis of poor results or having any noticeable issues, rather the 6th form screened everyone! I’ve achieved a science degree from a Russell group uni and I’m a qualified teacher now. It’s actually benefitted my teaching as I have strategies of how to manage it and cope with it and can pass these of as exam techniques and revision tips to students! Honestly don’t feel like it is looked on as an issue, there really aren’t stigmas around these things anymore, it’s just we are better at diagnosing and supporting students than before.

When I taught on an Access/Foundation course at a uni we had students in their 30’s only just being diagnosed and we put support in. Most universities offer study tips courses which you’ll probably benefit from and things like extended library loans as well as the extra DSA support. There’s always student wellbeing too to chat through any concerns you ever have.

You’ll be just fine and now you’ll have extra support to help you be even more fab! All the best
You sound like you ve picked a brilliant career to be a great role module for your students.
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carrie_b87
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(Original post by claireestelle)
You sound like you ve picked a brilliant career to be a great role module for your students.
Stumbled into teaching by chance to be honest! It was the one career I said I’d never want to do, but it really is great!! I teach in mainstream but naturally you end up teaching students with all needs from mental health, to ASD, ADHD, chronic health issues etc... I have to say the students that need the extra support or things being framed differently are my favourite; that’s when you’re really making a difference. I get to come up with some really quirky ways of explaining things to get that ‘ohhhh I get it’ moment! I’m pretty passionate about it! That and I like being a role model for women in science! I’d recommend the job to anyone despite me looking to leave the profession! I’m not one leaving because of the ‘stress, long hours for poor pay’ that get publicised, but rather because of a couple of my students telling me to chase my dream of being a doctor! I hope to keep doing a bit alongside though
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claireestelle
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(Original post by carrie_b87)
Stumbled into teaching by chance to be honest! It was the one career I said I’d never want to do, but it really is great!! I teach in mainstream but naturally you end up teaching students with all needs from mental health, to ASD, ADHD, chronic health issues etc... I have to say the students that need the extra support or things being framed differently are my favourite; that’s when you’re really making a difference. I get to come up with some really quirky ways of explaining things to get that ‘ohhhh I get it’ moment! I’m pretty passionate about it! That and I like being a role model for women in science! I’d recommend the job to anyone despite me looking to leave the profession! I’m not one leaving because of the ‘stress, long hours for poor pay’ that get publicised, but rather because of a couple of my students telling me to chase my dream of being a doctor! I hope to keep doing a bit alongside though
It's wonderful that you re following your dream and it's great that you ve helped children grasp things by explaining them in a different way that others wouldn't think of.
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