What's your beliefs regarding God and the purpose of life?

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username4449770
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I'm personally rather nihilistic but curious to see other people's opinions...
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username4490504
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(Original post by Athenaxxx)
I'm personally rather nihilistic but curious to see other people's opinions...
Woah. Such a great time to ask this question. I was having a discussion with someone about this earlier and I am currently studying - doing some reading on consciousness for a neuroscience module.

I am so agnostic lol I really have no idea, which is a boring response, but one thing I can't stand is nihilism because it essentially abrogates responsibility. It is lazy I suppose. Because in my mind even if the eternal meaning is not definitive, it does not mean we cannot live truly meaningful things here and now. Dostoyevsky is the great example when in one of his stories (Crime and Punishment - if I remember correcty) the extreme nihilist decides to kill because who cares if there is no meaning? And I loved that book, because it made the point essentially that nobody really believes that there is no meaning. We all fall in love. We all seek to further our education. We all do something to strive forward. We act nihilistic sometimes, but that is just because we don't want to feel bad about the things that we do that are bad. That's my opinion.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by ah317)
Woah. Such a great time to ask this question. I was having a discussion with someone about this earlier and I am currently studying - doing some reading on consciousness for a neuroscience module.

I am so agnostic lol I really have no idea, which is a boring response, but one thing I can't stand is nihilism because it essentially abrogates responsibility. It is lazy I suppose. Because in my mind even if the eternal meaning is not definitive, it does not mean we cannot live truly meaningful things here and now. Dostoyevsky is the great example when in one of his stories (Crime and Punishment - if I remember correcty) the extreme nihilist decides to kill because who cares if there is no meaning? And I loved that book, because it made the point essentially that nobody really believes that there is no meaning. We all fall in love. We all seek to further our education. We all do something to strive forward. We act nihilistic sometimes, but that is just because we don't want to feel bad about the things that we do that are bad. That's my opinion.
We love because we are programmed to procreate. We are programmed to procreate because that's how genes are selected; to not procreate is to not be selected, not to be here. In other words, procreation and love and fellowship are because we are here. They're not why we are here.
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chooseanother
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As someone with very poor mental health, my faith in God is one of the most comforting things. Feeling like I have a reason and a purpose to live keeps me optimistic, even in the worst circumstances.
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username4490504
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(Original post by Notoriety)
We love because we are programmed to procreate. We are programmed to procreate because that's how genes are selected; to not procreate is to not be selected, not to be here. In other words, procreation and love and fellowship are because we are here. They're not why we are here.
That misses the point. Firstly, love was just one example of many things from which we derive meaning. Secondly it assumes that love is purely subconscious. Whilst my point is, is that (whilst there is of course a biological imperative, no doubting that), the conscious aspect goes beyond the biological imperative. We subjectively choose to seek meaning and to derive meaning from things. Thirdly, even if it all was purely because of the biological imperative to propagate genes can we still derive meaning from it on a metaphysical level? I would imagine that would be possible.

I may have missed it, but I am not sure how you linked my point to "why we are here?". I don't know if there is an ultimate meaning, but certainly in the here and now, almost everyone does truly behave like there is meaning. We are having a meaningful discussion (hopefully) for example.
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username4454836
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God doesn't exist and life has no meaning.
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sinfonietta
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I've always liked this quote from Haruki Murakami's "Kafka on the Shore: "If you think God's there, He is. If you don't, He isn't." I like the simplicity of it and it's a way of looking at the concept of God that doesn't make me angry.

Meaning of life = to enjoy it.
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username4449770
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I totally understand your viewpoint but for me personally, everything (to some extent) seems futile as despite what we achieve in our short and temporary lives, we will all succumb to the same inevitable fate... and everything that we pride ourselves in society (regarding morals) is subjective... the state of actions being either 'good' or 'evil' (and even people) is simply based on opinion and not fact. So how can one find meaning in life where our moral compasses aren't objective but are simply a reflection of indoctrination by society? Henceforth, most people that we as humans are the primary species and that the Earth was primarily designed for us, but species such like ants [as silly as it sounds lmao] estimated to have 500 trillion members in their species. The only reason, that we may seem like the primary species and the whole world we reside in is essientally created us, is that evolution has put in this position. Its not something that is intrinsically embedded into nature but our entire existent is based on.... .... well no one knows the answer to that...

But despite having said all that, I would still classify myself as an agnostic, whilst I believe that our life on Earth has no meaning; I refuse to believe that life beyond material world is due to because of a random chain of events. I ultimately do believe that there is a purpose to the creation of the universe, but is too complex for the human mind to comprehend- and is beyond our earthly concepts of morality.
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username4454836
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(Original post by ah317)
Well you can choose to live as if there is no meaning, but you will just be miserable and if you follow through on your sophisticated philosophy, you'd probably just be a damned right pretty horrible person to know.
I don't need a meaning to find happiness or enjoy the life I have.

You have assumed a lot about me based on 8 words.
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username4490504
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(Original post by Decahedron)
I don't need a meaning to find happiness or enjoy the life I have.

You have assumed a lot about me based on 8 words.
I haven't assumed at all. My point is that nobody truly believes there is no meaning. You do find meaning in the things you do. They are meaningful to you. That is what my point is ultimately. If they were really meaningless to you then you wouldn't do them. If you really thought "this has no point at all" you wouldn't do it.

If that really was your philosophy that NOTHING has meaning my statement still stands. You'd be miserable and probably be a horrible person.
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Alesha1991
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I'm agnostic- sometimes I lean more towards believing in a higher power/ spiritual side to life & sometimes I lean more towards being sceptical. In terms of meaning in my own life, I try to work on my own self improvement & strive to live the best/ most successful life I can, enjoy new experiences etc. Also try to live an ethical lifestyle & do my bit to make the world a better place, even if its only in a small way. As far as a greater/ more spiritual meaning goes I'm interested to hear about different theories/ speculation but like I say I'm not committed to any one belief system. If there is something else after this life, I'll find out about it when the time comes & if there isn't- well I won't know about it anyway, so I'm not going to spend time worrying about it.
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username4454836
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(Original post by ah317)
I haven't assumed at all. My point is that nobody truly believes there is no meaning. You do find meaning in the things you do. They are meaningful to you. That is what my point is ultimately. If they were really meaningless to you then you wouldn't do them. If you really thought "this has no point at all" you wouldn't do it.

If that really was your philosophy that NOTHING has meaning my statement still stands. You'd be miserable and probably be a horrible person.
My point is life has no overriding meaning, you get born and you make do with the cards you are dealt, there is no deeper meaning than that, at least not to me.

I don't have a philosophy because I am not going to waste time making something up that I will never think about again.
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username4490504
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(Original post by Decahedron)
My point is life has no overriding meaning, you get born and you make do with the cards you are dealt, there is no deeper meaning than that, at least not to me.

I don't have a philosophy because I am not going to waste time making something up that I will never think about again.
Over-riding meaning is distinct from meaning in the here and now.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by ah317)
That misses the point. Firstly, love was just one example of many things from which we derive meaning. Secondly it assumes that love is purely subconscious. Whilst my point is, is that (whilst there is of course a biological imperative, no doubting that), the conscious aspect goes beyond the biological imperative. We subjectively choose to seek meaning and to derive meaning from things. Thirdly, even if it all was purely because of the biological imperative to propagate genes can we still derive meaning from it on a metaphysical level? I would imagine that would be possible.

I may have missed it, but I am not sure how you linked my point to "why we are here?". I don't know if there is an ultimate meaning, but certainly in the here and now, almost everyone does truly behave like there is meaning. We are having a meaningful discussion (hopefully) for example.
The game is rigged, isn't it? Through natural selection, the body develops to reward procreation with nice hormonal drops and it punishes isolationism biologically with melancholia. You have the seemingly free choice to do what you wish, but you are biased by your own biology towards the camp of love. You suppose the choice to not be violated by your own biology is "meaning"?

I don't quite agree that the nihilist cannot exist. Suppose you do not enjoy life, you would welcome the end of it, but you have been conditioned to not enjoy suicide and all its associated aspects like pain. In this scenario, you exist and hope to avoid pain. You must eat because you don't want to suffer the sensation of pain. Thus you must work to provide food. I would say here activity can come about, "doing" can come about, even with complete despondency; through fear of a negative. Whether that matches true nihilism is for someone else to worry about; but fear of pain as life's only meaning is close enough to nothingness, to me at least.
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username4454836
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(Original post by ah317)
Over-riding meaning is distinct from meaning in the here and now.
:clap2:
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The Disaster
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Existence is inherently futile. All meaning is constructed, usually as a means to cover up our individual and collective fears - the fear of death in particular. Most people cannot accept the unwavering and fundamental truth - perhaps the only truth - that their existence is for and constituted by nothingness. It is not a 'depressing' or 'miserable' point to make, it is simply the only point. In other words, the point is there is no point. Religion is the most obvious manifestation of this fear - rooted entirely in people being terrified of the nothingness that greets the end of their lives. And, to some extent, nearly every other human-made activity is at least partly rooted in the fact that people cannot face this truth - whether this be entertainment, sport, love, family etc. Distractions and artificial comforts. Another point, though related, is that I believe the act of having children is the most selfish of all human acts, perhaps even more than taking it - forcing guaranteed suffering and pain (as an inevitable part of anybody's life) on an entity (the child) that does not possess the capacity to resist. And, to return to the argument that this is somehow a 'miserable' outlook, I present precisely the opposite view. To know and accept life to be utterly futile and pointless is perhaps the greatest comfort of all - it certainly is to me. Religion and other 'faiths' that people adhere to act as pressures, as extra demands on oneself - do this and don't do that, be good and you will be rewarded etc. It's a constant game of catch-up and of further unnecessary expectation - isn't there enough pressure as it is, without the need for this? So the inescapable fact is that life is pointless, futile and meaningless. But instead of hiding behind your blankets borne of fear, accept the point that there is no point.
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username4449770
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(Original post by The Disaster)
Existence is inherently futile. All meaning is constructed, usually as a means to cover up our individual and collective fears - the fear of death in particular. Most people cannot accept the unwavering and fundamental truth - perhaps the only truth - that their existence is for and constituted by nothingness. It is not a 'depressing' or 'miserable' point to make, it is simply the only point. In other words, the point is there is no point. Religion is the most obvious manifestation of this fear - rooted entirely in people being terrified of the nothingness that greets the end of their lives. And, to some extent, nearly every other human-made activity is at least partly rooted in the fact that people cannot face this truth - whether this be entertainment, sport, love, family etc. Distractions and artificial comforts. Another point, though related, is that I believe the act of having children is the most selfish of all human acts, perhaps even more than taking it - forcing guaranteed suffering and pain (as an inevitable part of anybody's life) on an entity (the child) that does not possess the capacity to resist. And, to return to the argument that this is somehow a 'miserable' outlook, I present precisely the opposite view. To know and accept life to be utterly futile and pointless is perhaps the greatest comfort of all - it certainly is to me. Religion and other 'faiths' that people adhere to act as pressures, as extra demands on oneself - do this and don't do that, be good and you will be rewarded etc. It's a constant game of catch-up and of further unnecessary expectation - isn't there enough pressure as it is, without the need for this? So the inescapable fact is that life is pointless, futile and meaningless. But instead of hiding behind your blankets borne of fear, accept the point that there is no point.
Couldn't agree more
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yzanne
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To live your life to the fullest - by following your morals. not necessarily those of religion which sometimes are followed a little too closely and can cause guilt, and lack of self-strength.

As long as you are satisfied with the person you are and others around you are being boosted off your vibe - how can one argue that is not a full life? Whether you believe in religion or not, that is an additional extra in my eyes. The basis of most religions are rules for happiness, anyway, which is why it's so popular.
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awkwardshortguy
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I won't believe there is any God until they're is compelling evidence otherwise. In light of this I consider there to be no inherent purpose to any life in the universe. However I still think there are things people should and shouldn't do.
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Leviathan1611
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there is only one God, the God of Abraham, Issac and Jacob, who exists as three persons, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, and these three are one.

I see the purpose of life is to glorify God and win as many souls to Christ as possible before the day of judgement, all the while enjoying His blessings.
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