username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
yO, I'm gonna be going onto sixth form this year and I was wondering if y'all can provide me with some general tips prior ;-;;

If you can, perhaps give me some advice on these subject that I'm taking:
I think that I'm gonna be taking maths, further maths, chemistry and art. Reason why "i think that" is because i put down computer science but now i may be changing to further maths 0.0
I'm not sure on what I want to do in the future so i want to keep my options open hence the quite weird combination of A-Levels.

I know vaguely on some science/maths areas that I am interested in (in order of interest):
1. Medicine/pharmaceutical jobs/research
2. Computer science - programming robots or creating video games or something design based
3. Data research/scientist
4. Actuary/accountancy/banking

Now the ART areas I am interested in:
1. animation or graphic design or illustrating (all equally interested in)
2. film editing
3. designing in general (clothes, products, rooms etc.)
4. architecture

So, i kinda wanna know if these subjects i chose are applicable to these areas that im interested in and also ((if possible)) if you have any advice on what i should do because I'm VERY clueless on what path i should take :')
0
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
You know what? Great choices. I approve. If you were to go into medicine, your choices would be limited at best, but you have other plans too, so that's fine.
2
reply
username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Sinnoh)
You know what? Great choices. I approve. If you were to go into medicine, your choices would be limited at best, but you have other plans too, so that's fine.
Hey, thanks for your quick response! Do you think I could take medicine if I don't take biology though? thanks~
0
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by studyer)
Hey, thanks for your quick response! Do you think I could take medicine if I don't take biology though? thanks~
Not sure. Maybe. You'd have a much lower choice of unis though.
https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...al-schools.pdf
0
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Maths art and computer science sounds like a great combination to me. There's variety between the subjects, and they can all compliment each other well (maths & computer science is obvious, but I'd also argue art & computer science go well together, particularly if you're interested in videogame design or anything that involves a nice UI).

Most importantly though is taking subjects you'll find interesting, there aren't really any bad subjects, and most of your choices seem to compliment each other. You don't want a job in something you're uninterested in, and if you choose subjects you actually like then you're less likely to get sick of your subjects, which will make studying much easier and actually relevant for you.

It's probably not for everyone, but taking an EPQ could be great if you're a little unsure on what you want to do. It doesn't have to be anything too formal, it doesn't need to be something you're taking a relavant A-level for, and you can change it pretty heavily if your interests change (I literally started my EPQ working in a pair programming a pokémon fan-game, and four months later I'm making a metroidvania on my own and making the animations for it).

Take whatever you're interested in, all those subjects sound good! You'll probably get a stronger idea of what you want to do over time, and you can always study the other things later on, or less formally while you're doing your A-levels.
0
reply
username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by RikaX97)
Maths art and computer science sounds like a great combination to me. There's variety between the subjects, and they can all compliment each other well (maths & computer science is obvious, but I'd also argue art & computer science go well together, particularly if you're interested in videogame design or anything that involves a nice UI).

Most importantly though is taking subjects you'll find interesting, there aren't really any bad subjects, and most of your choices seem to compliment each other. You don't want a job in something you're uninterested in, and if you choose subjects you actually like then you're less likely to get sick of your subjects, which will make studying much easier and actually relevant for you.

It's probably not for everyone, but taking an EPQ could be great if you're a little unsure on what you want to do. It doesn't have to be anything too formal, it doesn't need to be something you're taking a relavant A-level for, and you can change it pretty heavily if your interests change (I literally started my EPQ working in a pair programming a pokémon fan-game, and four months later I'm making a metroidvania on my own and making the animations for it).

Take whatever you're interested in, all those subjects sound good! You'll probably get a stronger idea of what you want to do over time, and you can always study the other things later on, or less formally while you're doing your A-levels.
Thanks for your advice!!! Do you think I should be taking further maths or computer science? Because I see that a lot of universities take computer science (the course) for those who do further maths and that computer science isn't required...
0
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by studyer)
Thanks for your advice!!! Do you think I should be taking further maths or computer science? Because I see that a lot of universities take computer science (the course) for those who do further maths and that computer science isn't required...
I'd say computer science; you said you're unsure what you want to do, and computer science will probably leave of a variety of options open for you than two maths subjects would. Lot's of things are very specific to computer science (I don't know much about further maths, but I doubt it's relavent for programming ideas, understanding of hardware or the internet, or anything in the A-level Computer Science course really) whereas a good grade in both maths and computer science would suggest you're pretty good at maths.

Do what you're most interested in, but if you're unsure what you want, I'd reckon computer science would close less doors for you.
0
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
This post might get a bit rambly, but I thought it would be worth saying.

Taking both maths and further maths seems like doubling down on very specific subjects, and is probably only worth doing if you're certain you want a maths-intensive job. Furthermore, taking maths, futher maths and computer science all together would be horrible with the amount of memorising facts and uncreative stuff you would have to do. It would get stressful and mind-numbing.

Personally, I've taken computer science, maths and philosophy. Maths is a hard, fact-based subject, philosophy is loose and creative, and computer science is a nice middle ground. Philosophy is a bit out of place, but having a subject I'm interested in will leave me with some unique options later on, and honestly just preserves my sanity in the short-term. My EPQ is probably my favourite part though: I'm designing a videogame, with a focus on the art design. Since I dropped art at GCSE, I'm able to use this to pick up an interest I've gotten, and I'm combining it with a subject I have some experience with. More importantly, it's something I actually enjoy and care about.

Hope my advice helps a little lol.
0
reply
kurro
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
Those 4 are all good subjects to choose at AS, but I would recommend dropping the subject you find to be weaker or the one you lose the most interest in after you finish AS. As universities only require 3 subjects and there really is no advantage in having 4.

I too took maths, chemistry, and art (but I had physics too, which I dropped after AS as it was too hard.)
I would only recommend choosing further maths if you REALLY like maths as it will be very hard. All my friends dropped it. But you are not them so you might find it easier who knows.

Art will be very time consuming and I totally regret choosing it, I should have taken computer science instead of as that is what I am going for haha

Ok now for the courses:
- For a medicine type course, a majority of the universities need chemistry as well as maths, physics or biology. So I suggest you take maths and chemistry.
- For computer science the top uni's require maths and the rest will have an option of maths or computer science. So you don't really need computer science, but it will help.
- For a scientist/data research, it is the same subjects for medicine/pharmaceutical courses.
- For accounting, there is no requirement, but the ones that will help are maths, accounting, economics, and business studies.
- For any art related subjects, you only need art and maybe maths if you were to go into architecture.

I really don't think you need further maths, but take it if you really want to. I would suggest maybe biology to help with medicine or something else.

Before A levels I didn't know what I wanted to do exactly too. I had a few ideas for doing animation or some type of engineering. So I took the subjects that would open the most paths for me (maths, chem, physics, and art)
But soon after I told my parents about my animation career idea, and they soon told me to let go of that idea as they said I probably won't get a job. But this is not the case, there are many opportunities. (They are Asian and think I should go with the traditional fields lol)
Then I jumped between different engineering areas such as aerospace, mechanical, civil and software. Then the time to apply for uni came out of nowhere so I chose software engineering. But changed it to computer science as it has a higher scope and I can do software engineering as a job if I want to (assuming I get the degree of course haha)
I didn't choose any of the other engineerings as physics will play a big part and physics was SOOO hard for me.

But ye now I applied for computer science and no idea what I am in for. So I suggest you find out a lot of info in the next year for each career path so you know what you want to do.
But it's still okay if you don't know what you want to do with your life as there are many 25+year-olds who are still lost. xD

You essentially want to choose the subjects you are most interested in and the ones you enjoy the most. As when it comes to revision it will be much easier. (GCSE's are nothing compared to A levels. Trust me.)

Wow this is was long haha
enjoy
and good luck
Last edited by kurro; 1 year ago
1
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by kurro)
Those 4 are all good subjects to choose at AS, but I would recommend dropping the subject you find to be weaker or the one you lose the most interest in after you finish AS. As universities only require 3 subjects and there really is no advantage in having 4.
This seems like pretty good advice, and the 3 A-levels instead of 4 is pretty true; 3 A-levels is almost definitely enough, even moreso if you do extra things or research on top of those subjects. However, I'd say that if you're unsure about what subjects you want to take at the moment, taking 4 A-levels for a few months and dropping whichever one you end up having the least interest in could be a good approach; sometimes the best way to figure out what you're interested in is to take a shot at taking the subject.

Also,
"But it's still okay if you don't know what you want to do with your life as there are many 25+year-olds who are still lost. xD"

Don't worry too much, if after you've done your A-levels you find out you wanted to take something else, there will be another way to do it. It might not be convinient, but with enough time and effort you can probably manage it.
Art, for example, you can start working freelance of your own accord, build up a portfolio, maybe even get some social media presence. Experience, skill, dedication and recognition are all very important. (Also, so many famous people in computer science never actually took a computer science course. Check out Michael Reeves https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtH...YDpJgMSGy7AeSw , he's apparently entirely self-taught and making functional robots).
1
reply
username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by kurro)
Those 4 are all good subjects to choose at AS, but I would recommend dropping the subject you find to be weaker or the one you lose the most interest in after you finish AS. As universities only require 3 subjects and there really is no advantage in having 4.

I too took maths, chemistry, and art (but I had physics too, which I dropped after AS as it was too hard.)
I would only recommend choosing further maths if you REALLY like maths as it will be very hard. All my friends dropped it. But you are not them so you might find it easier who knows.

Art will be very time consuming and I totally regret choosing it, I should have taken computer science instead of as that is what I am going for haha

Ok now for the courses:
- For a medicine type course, a majority of the universities need chemistry as well as maths, physics or biology. So I suggest you take maths and chemistry.
- For computer science the top uni's require maths and the rest will have an option of maths or computer science. So you don't really need computer science, but it will help.
- For a scientist/data research, it is the same subjects for medicine/pharmaceutical courses.
- For accounting, there is no requirement, but the ones that will help are maths, accounting, economics, and business studies.
- For any art related subjects, you only need art and maybe maths if you were to go into architecture.

I really don't think you need further maths, but take it if you really want to. I would suggest maybe biology to help with medicine or something else.

Before A levels I didn't know what I wanted to do exactly too. I had a few ideas for doing animation or some type of engineering. So I took the subjects that would open the most paths for me (maths, chem, physics, and art)
But soon after I told my parents about my animation career idea, and they soon told me to let go of that idea as they said I probably won't get a job. But this is not the case, there are many opportunities. (They are Asian and think I should go with the traditional fields lol)
Then I jumped between different engineering areas such as aerospace, mechanical, civil and software. Then the time to apply for uni came out of nowhere so I chose software engineering. But changed it to computer science as it has a higher scope and I can do software engineering as a job if I want to (assuming I get the degree of course haha)
I didn't choose any of the other engineerings as physics will play a big part and physics was SOOO hard for me.

But ye now I applied for computer science and no idea what I am in for. So I suggest you find out a lot of info in the next year for each career path so you know what you want to do.
But it's still okay if you don't know what you want to do with your life as there are many 25+year-olds who are still lost. xD

You essentially want to choose the subjects you are most interested in and the ones you enjoy the most. As when it comes to revision it will be much easier. (GCSE's are nothing compared to A levels. Trust me.)

Wow this is was long haha
enjoy
and good luck
Thank you soooo much for your great advice! I feel like i relate to you at SO MANY LEVELS. I have asian parents too who told me to not do art as they told me it was useless and had THE SAME REACTION WHEN I SAID THAT I WANTED TO DO ANIMATION haha but i persisted since i really enjoyed it.
I want to ask, if you don't mind, what made you not want to do animation? and also what made you go into computer science?
1
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by RikaX97)
Furthermore, taking maths, futher maths and computer science all together would be horrible with the amount of memorising facts and uncreative stuff you would have to do. It would get stressful and mind-numbing.
I know someone that takes that combination. I think it probably just boils down to the person.
1
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Tolgarda)
I know someone that takes that combination. I think it probably just boils down to the person.
I'm sure it can be right for some people, but for most people I reckon it would get boring, if not stressful. Particularly since this person mentions they have an interest in art and design. But you're absolutely right, I was a little harsh on that mix, if it's something you're really passionate about, then it could be worth doing.
1
reply
kurro
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by studyer)
Thank you soooo much for your great advice! I feel like i relate to you at SO MANY LEVELS. I have asian parents too who told me to not do art as they told me it was useless and had THE SAME REACTION WHEN I SAID THAT I WANTED TO DO ANIMATION haha but i persisted since i really enjoyed it.
I want to ask, if you don't mind, what made you not want to do animation? and also what made you go into computer science?
All good
Wow what a coincidence hahaha

I didn't choose animation cause my parents won't let me
Its mainly because my dad's sister has an art related job and doesn't do so well. It did frustrate me at the start as they would not support me with my passion but I knew they would not budge, so I gave up hahaha
Also, art became a chore in A level due to the amount of work we had to produce each week. I gradually lost my passion for art. I basically became a machine that produced art xD
I had 2 teachers too and they argued with each other a lot lol so we barely knew what we were doing hahaha

But when it came to deciding to choose uni course engineering was my only interest. I didn't want to do aerospace/mechanical as I was bad at physics. Then my uncle told me that he does software engineering, so I thought I would give that a shot. But because I don't know what I want to specialize in I thought I would go with computer science as it has a wider scope, so I can still go into software engineering if I wanted too. I still don't know if it is for me tbh haha
Now I need BBB to get into Cardiff xD
Last edited by kurro; 1 year ago
0
reply
necroticblast
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
You should get experience during the summer holidays in different areas and then choose the subjects depending on what you like and grades too. Also, look at the courses at uni and write a down a list of subject combinations and requirements. I have a weird subject combination too which made it difficult for me to choose courses at uni, as I did not have that many options. I am thinking of doing Computer Science at uni, and it was hard for me to get chosen by uni since Comp sci gives priority to people who have a good personal statement and how your subjects relate to the course you want to do and, obviously good predicted grades.
Oh yee, and in my opinion, some subjects are easy at GCSEs but very hard at A levels. Like, Biology is very hard because there's too much content to learn, while on the other hand, I find Computer Science easier. It's basically GCSEs stuffs but a bit in depth
0
reply
username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by necroticblast)
You should get experience during the summer holidays in different areas and then choose the subjects depending on what you like and grades too. Also, look at the courses at uni and write a down a list of subject combinations and requirements. I have a weird subject combination too which made it difficult for me to choose courses at uni, as I did not have that many options. I am thinking of doing Computer Science at uni, and it was hard for me to get chosen by uni since Comp sci gives priority to people who have a good personal statement and how your subjects relate to the course you want to do and, obviously good predicted grades.
Oh yee, and in my opinion, some subjects are easy at GCSEs but very hard at A levels. Like, Biology is very hard because there's too much content to learn, while on the other hand, I find Computer Science easier. It's basically GCSEs stuffs but a bit in depth
oh, may i ask how computer science A-level is like? I haven't taken it for GCSEs and i only grew an interest for it at the start of year 11 so i practically know nothing :/
0
reply
necroticblast
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by studyer)
oh, may i ask how computer science A-level is like? I haven't taken it for GCSEs and i only grew an interest for it at the start of year 11 so i practically know nothing :/
so so. if you have not done it for GCSEs then you probably need to do a bit more work than others who have done comp sci. The first year starts as easy then it kinda gets hard, I've done Computing for GCSEs which is like easier than "Computer Science". there are 2 written exams (Computer Systems and Algorithms) and there's a programming project, where you have to make your program. I'm making a 2d rpg game while others are making databases or my friends who are doing electronics are combining with it to make sensors etc. Feel free to ask more questions!!
0
reply
RikaX97
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by studyer)
oh, may i ask how computer science A-level is like? I haven't taken it for GCSEs and i only grew an interest for it at the start of year 11 so i practically know nothing :/
I just wrote this out and realised I'm not the person you were replying to (I'm still getting used to this website lol), but I'll post this anyway, in case you're interested.

The course seems to be trying to cover a variety of bases all at once, teaching the basics of a lot of areas of computer science, while going more in-depth with object-oriented programming. I don't feel like it's a very hard course, but if you haven't done the GCSE course, you might need to catch up on assumed knowledge in quite a few topics.

I won't go through all the topics, but some examples are;
Some object-oriented programming (we do Java at my school), a little declarative programming in SQL, a little website design HTML & CSS.
Some binary arithmetic and stuff about data types.
Some internet theory, such as how packet switching and different malware work.
Some software development theory, such as different methods of development.
0
reply
username4184780
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by RikaX97)
I just wrote this out and realised I'm not the person you were replying to (I'm still getting used to this website lol), but I'll post this anyway, in case you're interested.

The course seems to be trying to cover a variety of bases all at once, teaching the basics of a lot of areas of computer science, while going more in-depth with object-oriented programming. I don't feel like it's a very hard course, but if you haven't done the GCSE course, you might need to catch up on assumed knowledge in quite a few topics.

I won't go through all the topics, but some examples are;
Some object-oriented programming (we do Java at my school), a little declarative programming in SQL, a little website design HTML & CSS.
Some binary arithmetic and stuff about data types.
Some internet theory, such as how packet switching and different malware work.
Some software development theory, such as different methods of development.
oh haha, thank you so much! This is very helpful!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Regarding Ofqual's most recent update, do you think you will be given a fair grade this summer?

Yes (220)
33.64%
No (434)
66.36%

Watched Threads

View All