Has anyone gotten rid of anxiety w/o therapy or drugs Watch

amara<3
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I've had enough and can't afford therapy and am scared of taking the drugs cause of the side effects. If anyone has advice it is greatly appreciated <3
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Pathway
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You can get therapy for free on the NHS. You need to use things you learn in therapy in your life for it to be effective.
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Snfkin
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What kind of anxiety are we talking?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Pathway)
You can get therapy for free on the NHS. You need to use things you learn in therapy in your life for it to be effective.
Therapy can be extremely beneficial, but the waiting lists on the NHS for therapy are appalling. A few years ago I was told it would be a 9 month wait, which for a 13/14 year old was unfathomable. Luckily I was able to get therapy at my specialist hospital so I can so to OP that it really does work, the main issue is actually getting it.
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amara<3
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Constant fear of judgement, overthinking, excessive nervousness in public etc.
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Pathway
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Therapy can be extremely beneficial, but the waiting lists on the NHS for therapy are appalling. A few years ago I was told it would be a 9 month wait, which for a 13/14 year old was unfathomable. Luckily I was able to get therapy at my specialist hospital so I can so to OP that it really does work, the main issue is actually getting it.
Yes, I am aware. I waited over a year for specialist trauma therapy in secondary care and almost got sectioned numerous times whilst I waited.

IAPT however is usually quite quick from what I've heard (I've never been under IAPT). It's worth a shot for OP if they can no longer pay for private.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by amara<3)
Constant fear of judgement, overthinking, excessive nervousness in public etc.
Same anon as before. That was one of my issues, I was able to (largely) overcome it by changing my thinking patterns. Instead of it being "those girls are looking at me because there's something wrong with me", it became "they must like my hair". It was all about identifying the triggers and stopping my thought pattern before I reached the conclusion.

For nervousness, the main way to overcome that is just to, little by little, to do things that take you out of your comfort zone. I used to be terrified of just buying a chocolate bar at the co-op, but when I finally managed it I realised it wasn't so bad and I felt proud of myself. I was still scared to do it again, but the more I did little things like that, the more confident I grew.
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Gingertraveller
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(Original post by amara&lt;3)
I've had enough and can't afford therapy and am scared of taking the drugs cause of the side effects. If anyone has advice it is greatly appreciated <3
I would recommend meditation to you, rubbish if you like but atleast try it. I'm going in to study mental health nursing with everything going to plan, but I believe drugs should be the last resort period. There is better easier natural alternatives
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amara<3
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Thanks so much anon & everyone for replying. I will try everything you guys said and am looking for IAPT rn. <3
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Anonymous #2
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Yes.

I had crippling social anxiety back in secondary school. It was so bad that I would spend the entire hour trying and failing to ask the person sitting next to me for a ruler. I would just run through every single bad thing that could happen to me, would eventually give up and just use the side of my book.

Didn't have many friends as a result, I literally could not talk to people and would spend my days sweating and keeping my head down. Even when it came to basic things like buying stuff at the store, I would chicken out while waiting in line, put my items back on the shelf and walk out.

I went to therapy for 3 months and it didn't help me at all. Suppose it's all subjective.

Then, I started university.

I moved out of my parents' home and lived (am living) with three total strangers in a shared flat. Within a week, it was like I was a completely new person. I found that I could talk to people so much more easily. I would literally bend over and strike up a conversation with a random stranger in my lectures, which was totally beyond which I ever thought myself capable of doing.

Nowadays, it's almost as though my anxiety never existed lol!

I think it's really about the situations that you find yourself in.. not sure where you're at in life, but a change of scenery could do you good. You need to put yourself in "lasting" situations where you can practise flexing your social skills. My therapist was always telling me to go out as much as possible, only I don't believe that simply going out for a couple of hours can really improve your way of thinking. You need to be in a lasting situation like I am to see a difference.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yes.

I had crippling social anxiety back in secondary school. It was so bad that I would spend the entire hour trying and failing to ask the person sitting next to me for a ruler. I would just run through every single bad thing that could happen to me, would eventually give up and just use the side of my book.

Didn't have many friends as a result, I literally could not talk to people and would spend my days sweating and keeping my head down. Even when it came to basic things like buying stuff at the store, I would chicken out while waiting in line, put my items back on the shelf and walk out.

I went to therapy for 3 months and it didn't help me at all. Suppose it's all subjective.

Then, I started university.

I moved out of my parents' home and lived (am living) with three total strangers in a shared flat. Within a week, it was like I was a completely new person. I found that I could talk to people so much more easily. I would literally bend over and strike up a conversation with a random stranger in my lectures, which was totally beyond which I ever thought myself capable of doing.

Nowadays, it's almost as though my anxiety never existed lol!

I think it's really about the situations that you find yourself in.. not sure where you're at in life, but a change of scenery could do you good. You need to put yourself in "lasting" situations where you can practise flexing your social skills. My therapist was always telling me to go out as much as possible, only I don't believe that simply going out for a couple of hours can really improve your way of thinking. You need to be in a lasting situation like I am to see a difference.
I'm glad you've said that because I'm hoping that going to uni later this year will help my anxiety. Whenever I'm low (which is a lot atm lol), I get really optimistic at the thought of going to my fave uni (which I got an offer for ), so I'm glad to hear it helped you with your anxiety. Hopefully the same will happen with me
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amara<3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yes.

I had crippling social anxiety back in secondary school. It was so bad that I would spend the entire hour trying and failing to ask the person sitting next to me for a ruler. I would just run through every single bad thing that could happen to me, would eventually give up and just use the side of my book.

Didn't have many friends as a result, I literally could not talk to people and would spend my days sweating and keeping my head down. Even when it came to basic things like buying stuff at the store, I would chicken out while waiting in line, put my items back on the shelf and walk out.

I went to therapy for 3 months and it didn't help me at all. Suppose it's all subjective.

Then, I started university.

I moved out of my parents' home and lived (am living) with three total strangers in a shared flat. Within a week, it was like I was a completely new person. I found that I could talk to people so much more easily. I would literally bend over and strike up a conversation with a random stranger in my lectures, which was totally beyond which I ever thought myself capable of doing.

Nowadays, it's almost as though my anxiety never existed lol!

I think it's really about the situations that you find yourself in.. not sure where you're at in life, but a change of scenery could do you good. You need to put yourself in "lasting" situations where you can practise flexing your social skills. My therapist was always telling me to go out as much as possible, only I don't believe that simply going out for a couple of hours can really improve your way of thinking. You need to be in a lasting situation like I am to see a difference.
This is so helpful to me ty. I recently moved to a grammar college and was so happy and optimistic in the beginning about making new friends and it was so easy for me but my anxiety was crippling in my old school between 14-16. I was so surprised when it disappeared and happy but the symptoms are gradually coming back out of nowhere and it's making me feel so down and worthless. I'm so happy that you got over it and I hope another change of scenery in a year when i go uni will do the same
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amara<3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm glad you've said that because I'm hoping that going to uni later this year will help my anxiety. Whenever I'm low (which is a lot atm lol), I get really optimistic at the thought of going to my fave uni (which I got an offer for ), so I'm glad to hear it helped you with your anxiety. Hopefully the same will happen with me
Congrats!! I hope it helps you too. Stay optimistic it's all gonna make us stronger in the long run. May I ask what uni you got into and what course and how you got through the interview process xx
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(Original post by amara<3)
Congrats!! I hope it helps you too. Stay optimistic it's all gonna make us stronger in the long run. May I ask what uni you got into and what course and how you got through the interview process xx
Do you want me to talk about in on PM? Might be easier lol xx
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(Original post by amara<3)
This is so helpful to me ty. I recently moved to a grammar college and was so happy and optimistic in the beginning about making new friends and it was so easy for me but my anxiety was crippling in my old school between 14-16. I was so surprised when it disappeared and happy but the symptoms are gradually coming back out of nowhere and it's making me feel so down and worthless. I'm so happy that you got over it and I hope another change of scenery in a year when i go uni will do the same
Glad to have helped!

It really does fluctuate. First 4 weeks or so of Uni, I was all over the place, visiting societies, chatting to random people. But then things started to die down and I felt as though I was spiraling into a pit of anxiety again.

But trust me, if you ever find yourself in that situation again, take it as a push to work even harder. Make the effort to ask people out, to ask for help during lectures, anything will do.

After that initial fluctuation, I'm now back on my feet again and feeling pretty good.

Good luck! Uni can do wonders.
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username4316350
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Therapy can be extremely beneficial, but the waiting lists on the NHS for therapy are appalling. A few years ago I was told it would be a 9 month wait, which for a 13/14 year old was unfathomable. Luckily I was able to get therapy at my specialist hospital so I can so to OP that it really does work, the main issue is actually getting it.
might be long waiting list. but u gotta give it to the nhs for providing it for free
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username4316350
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in my experience - quit porn, masturbation, cut down video games, stop binge watching netflix, cut excessive internet browsing, delete everything except fundamentals on phone, quit social media, eat a cleaner diet. socialise more, go to gym, meditation, read books, go to bed at a reasonable time, do something productive. work towards becoming best version of myself. imo no chit do u have anxiety if u jerk off to hardcore porn everynight, eat like a slob, get up at 2pm, never work out or take care of urslef
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amara<3
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(Original post by SJW-)
in my experience - quit porn, masturbation, cut down video games, stop binge watching netflix, cut excessive internet browsing, delete everything except fundamentals on phone, quit social media, eat a cleaner diet. socialise more, go to gym, meditation, read books, go to bed at a reasonable time, do something productive. work towards becoming best version of myself. imo no chit do u have anxiety if u jerk off to hardcore porn everynight, eat like a slob, get up at 2pm, never work out or take care of urslef
Ty but I've never watched porn in my life (I'm muslim) but I'll try eating healthier and exercising more
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