Is computer science with discrete maths at uni as useful as regular computer science Watch

DennisC24
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Hi. This is my first post to this forum. I'm currently studying gcse's (I know I know uni is a long way away) I enjoy computer science and maths however some of the computer science theory can get very bland. I love coding though . I've made my own web crawler and managed to create a program which visualised an object falling at different gravitational fields. Im hoping to go to Warwick University to do CS and there is a discrete mathematics option. I wonder if it is given the same respect as normal CS. Thanks for any help
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pi=e
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The discrete maths course is essentially a computer science & mathematics degree. At a level you might meet decision maths if you take further maths which is the type of maths you’ll use in a computer science degree. If you like this type of maths a lot then discrete maths may be a good choice. Data science is also similar, with a few more statistics modules
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DennisC24
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My intentions for a level are pretty geeky. Physics computer science maths and further maths .They're my strongest subjects
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pi=e
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(Original post by DennisC24)
My intentions for a level are pretty geeky. Physics computer science maths and further maths .They're my strongest subjects
They’re perfect options for comp sci/maths at degree level, if you find the workload tough I’d drop physics though. If your school decides to do decision maths in your further maths course you’ll get a much better feel for it and can decide then whether you want to do discrete maths or just comp sci
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DennisC24
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two questions. 1) what is decision maths 2) do you learn the principles of ai in computer science with discrete maths
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Moments
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I'd do economics instead of physics for A-level. Broadens your skillset in case you wanted to get into financial engineering.
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pi=e
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(Original post by DennisC24)
two questions. 1) what is decision maths 2) do you learn the principles of ai in computer science with discrete maths
1. Decision maths (or discrete maths, they’re the same thing) is a type of maths commonly used in computer science such as graph theory, algorithms etc. You might want to ask your teacher if he has a book on it

2. Whether you learn about AI in a discrete maths (or computer science) degree depends on the university, you will definitely do more maths and less computer science in a discrete maths degree. AI I believe is a topic that is delved deeper into at postgrad level but I’m sure most comp sci/discrete maths degrees have it as an optional module
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DennisC24
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thanks for all your help so far. when you said that there's more maths than computer science. is it considered more as a maths degree than a cs degree because I would like to get into something like software development when I'm lots older
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(Original post by DennisC24)
thanks for all your help so far. when you said that there's more maths than computer science. is it considered more as a maths degree than a cs degree because I would like to get into something like software development when I'm lots older
It’s more of a computer science and maths degree. The Warwick degree seems to be 50% comp sci modules and 50% maths modules with a lot of these maths modules being discrete maths which is inherently related to computer science, but it does have some pure maths too. You could definitely get into software development with a discrete maths degree.
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DennisC24
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thanks for all the help. this is my first time on the student room and you've made it a good first time. thank you
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Jarred
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(Original post by DennisC24)
Hi. This is my first post to this forum. I'm currently studying gcse's (I know I know uni is a long way away) I enjoy computer science and maths however some of the computer science theory can get very bland. I love coding though . I've made my own web crawler and managed to create a program which visualised an object falling at different gravitational fields. Im hoping to go to Warwick University to do CS and there is a discrete mathematics option. I wonder if it is given the same respect as normal CS. Thanks for any help
I studied CS at Warwick and knew a lot of Discrete Maths students there. As someone else said, it's basically a brand Warwick uses for what once might have been called a "Computer Science and Maths" degree. It's more or less 50% CS and 50% maths but in third year there's the option to specialise in what you want but DM students get a little bit less choice because they have to study a certain proportion of the maths. For example, I think it's possible for a DM student to take like 80% worth of maths in the final year, but they wouldn't have the same freedom to do the equivalent in more programming-oriented stuff.

Both CS and DM students I know seem to have done well in careers so both have good recognition from employers. I think it would have been harder for me to get my current job if I had taken DM instead though. This is only because I work in a highly specialised field in a topic that DM students would have been less likely to cover unless they chose it as an option (whereas its required core for CS). That being said, I loved the discrete maths modules and purely in terms of what I find interesting, DM would have been an even better fit than CS. I know lots of DM students who ended up in good software engineering positions like their CS counterparts. Similarly I know both CS and DM students who went into finance. Both are nice difficult degrees but that's what gets you a job imo.

I'd be interested in what you mean when you say you don't like the theory though. The DM course is essentially a course in theoretical computer science plus some maths. Warwick CS is also highly theoretical anyway (which imo is the mark of a proper CS course but then I'm a bit snobby ) However because you're at GCSE, what you call theory is probably very different from what I would call theory as all of these subjects start to grow in interesting ways as you get into higher levels!
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