B1458 – Children and Young Persons Act 1933 (Amendment) Bill 2019 (Second Reading) Watch

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B1458 – Children and Young Persons Act 1933 (Amendment) Bill 2019 (Second Reading), TSR Government
A
BILL
TO

Amend the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 as to raise the age of legal consumption of alcohol in private premises, and to introduce staggered criminal charges in regards to negligence surrounding the consumption of alcohol by a child.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 - Definitions
Within the scope of this Bill, the following are to be defined as follows:-
(X) (1) ‘authorised person’ shall refer to any trained and qualified medical professional or a member of the police force, exercising his duty.
(X) (2) ‘field impairment test’ shall refer to the procedure whereby an authorised person administering the test-
(X) (X) (a) observes the child to whom the test is administered in his performance of tasks, specifically:-
(X) (X) (X) (i) a pupillary examination;
(X) (X) (X) (ii) Romberg balance test;
(X) (X) (X) (iii) walk and turn test;
(X) (X) (X) (iv) one leg stand test;
(X) (X) (X) (v) finger to nose test;
(X) (X) (b) makes such other observations of the person’s physical state as the authorised person thinks expedient.
(X) (3) ‘good reason’ shall refer to criteria that grants a child exemption from field impairment tests including but not limited to age and disability.

2 - Amendment
(1) S5 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 is to be amended to become S5(a) and to read as follows: “If any person gives, or causes to be given, to any child under the age of ten years any alcohol (within the meaning given by section 191 of the Licensing Act 2003, but disregarding subsection (1)(f) to (i) of that section), except upon the order of a duly qualified medical practitioner, or in case of sickness, apprehended sickness, or other urgent cause, he shall, on summary conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding level 2 on the standard scale.”
(2) S5(b) is to be inserted into the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 and read as follows: “If any person gives, or causes to be given, to any child under the age of thirteen years any alcohol (within the meaning given by section 191 of the Licensing Act 2003, but disregarding subsection (1)(f) to (i) of that section), except upon the order of a duly qualified medical practitioner, or in case of sickness, apprehended sickness, or other urgent cause, without the guidance of a parent or carer, in an unsupervised environment or where the amount of alcohol given is sufficient to cause said child to fail a 'field impairment test' without good reason or to cause said child to require medical attention, he shall, on summary conviction of gross negligence whilst in the possession of a child, be liable to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale.”
(3) S5(c) is to be inserted into the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 and read as follows: “If any person gives, or causes to be given, to any child between the ages of thirteen years and sixteen years any alcohol (within the meaning given by section 191 of the Licensing Act 2003, but disregarding subsection (1)(f) to (i) of that section), except upon the order of a duly qualified medical practitioner, or in case of sickness, apprehended sickness, or other urgent cause, without the guidance of a parent or carer, in an unsupervised environment or where the amount of alcohol given is sufficient to cause said child to fail a 'field impairment test' without good reason or to cause said child to require medical attention, he shall, on summary conviction of negligence whilst in the possession of a child, be liable to a fine not exceeding 100.00 GBP.”

3 - Citation and Commencement:
(1) This act extends to the whole of the United Kingdom.
(2) This act will come into force upon Royal Assent.
(3) This act may be cited as the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 (Amendment) Act 2019.

Notes
The current law stipulates that those aged five years and above are permitted to consume alcohol, without evident restrictions, in private premises. Ergo, this Bill proposes to amend the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 to increase the age of legal consumption to seven years of age, and to introduce specific criminal charges to negligence surrounding the consumption of alcohol by a child - charges which are staggered and representative of the potential danger caused by excessive consumption within each set band of ages.

The Chief Medical Office for England, in guidance documentation concerning the consumption of alcohol by children and young people and released by the Department of Health, states, among other things, the following:
Early age of drinking onset is associated with an increased likelihood of developing alcohol abuse or dependence in adolescence and adulthood, and also dependence at a younger age.
Children who begin drinking at a young age (typically below the age of 13) drink more frequently and in greater quantities than those who delay drinking, and are more likely to drink to intoxication. As with alcohol dependence and abuse, vulnerability to alcohol misuse in later
adolescence appears to be greatest among those who begin drinking prior to age 13.
Adolescence represents an important period of brain development. Young people with alcohol use disorders may display structural and functional deficits in brain development compared with their non-alcohol-using peers. Studies of these young people have shown that significant changes in brain structure accompany heavy drinking that can affect motivation, reasoning, interpersonal interactions and other brain functions. In addition, heavy drinking during adolescence may affect normal brain functioning during adulthood. Young people who drink heavily may also experience adverse effects on liver, bone, growth and endocrine development.


Changes for the Second Reading
The minimum age has further been raised to ten years of age.

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Samuel J. Booker
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I am glad the second reading has again raised the age. Alcohol consumption among young people is an issue which is quickly gaining traction. Alcoholism is a dangerous and expensive habit, both for the consumer and the government. Encouraging and abetting alcohol consumption is putting our children at risk. The tighter we can make the law on underage drinking the more we prevent early alcohol addictions.

I shall be supporting this bill.
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SoggyCabbages
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Hear hear. Glad the age has been raised more in this second reading. A sensible bill.
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Rakas21
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I do of course grant this bill my full support.
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ns_2
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We believe that we have listened to the House on this Bill - and hope that this can recieve widereaching support.

That being said, if anyone has any qualms or issues with this Bill, we are more than happy to listen and adapt.
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This bill is in cessation.
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Division! Clear the lobbies!
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