Best universities for masters in continental philosophy

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msteps
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1. What are the best universities in the UK that offer masters in Continental Philosophy? (Or at least are known to lean more towards it).

2. Is it a wise move to major in this field? Are universities looking for academics in this field? If not, what would be a advisable strategy to "build" a academic career whilst still leaning towards this area as much as possible?

Thanks x
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LuigiMario
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A quick reply, I have friends who have done quite a bit of philosophy in their pre university studies at school. This has been enormously helpful in developing critical thinking and debating skills. It's difficult to choose a subject 'major' in the hope that this can lead directly to a career, of course that might work, but usually the path is highly interesting, whilst unpredictable and you have to start somewhere!

UK doesn't usually have "major" subjects, much of the headline degree is a single monolithic subject - tho' comparing UK with , say, uniGE or UNIL of CH, it is actually more flexible. A few colleges have recently started "major" or even matrix degrees, University of Dundee, 'Liberal Arts' is one such, University of Limerick 'Liberal Arts' , University of Cork 'International Arts' are worthy of a look too. Hopefully someone here might know more of the Philosophical greats in the UK . Some might see it as a weaker subject, as hard STEM is supposed to be the best route to work, but how boring would the world be with just engineers!

Dundee link, in my opinion - an amazing course https://www.dundee.ac.uk/study/ug/liberal-arts/
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gjd800
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Royal Holloway has a Continental slant and has a good department regardless of what people on here will quip about the institution in general. Warwick also has good continental coverage and do a cont degree, but this is unusual. King's has a good continental slant, too. Dundee are so-so for it. Maybe Southampton. You aren't usually gonna get a 'Continental Philosophy' degree, you are usually only gonna get places that cover it in more detail than others.

Not that it really matters. You are gonna have to do your own digging on this and get into some syllabi, I suppose, to see what you really fancy.

In response to the second question, the answer to are institutions looking for academics is a broad 'no'. It is incredibly difficult to get into a philosophy dept as a fresh PhD holder (and you will have to have a PhD). The best way to build a profile to make it more likely is to publish and get funded. Both of these will help greatly. I first published when I was an undergraduate and did again during my Master's -- this was the main reason that I got a funded PhD, and the funded PhD (and niche expertise, I suppose) is the man reason that I fell into work. Depts like that you can out 'AHRC funded scholarship' on your CV because it allegedly speaks to the quality of the person they are recruiting. Of course, it doesn't really do that, but this is how these admin-orientated, target-obsessed depts think. For me, getting into a dept was more luck than design and that has also been the experience of most of my peers that actually found some work during or post-doctorate. If you do find work you will likely also find yourself on *****y fractional contracts for a while, so security isn't fab.

The poster above is talking about lib arts but that's not the same a philosophy degree, which is a rigorous course and is suitably respected as such (apart from by some of the STEM master racer 18 year old plonkers on here). Lib arts is seen as a weak, wishy-washy subject over here, fairly or no.
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FoucaultMyGawd!
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Essex, Staffordshire, Warwick, Dundee, Kingston, Sussex, Royal Holloway, and Goldsmiths all provide entirely continental philosophy degrees (some also offer analytic if you're looking for a mixed bag). There are probably others - those are just the institutions I looked at.I think your best bet is to check out a syllabus or two and see what the various professors specialise in and pick what floats your boat that way. I'm in the last few months of an MA in continental philosophy at Staffordshire, and it's been great.Regarding your questions about academia - I'm not well positioned to answer them. I would say that there is much more continental philosophy available in the UK today than there was when I did my first degree (a decade ago). Whether that trend will continue, and whether it will result in job openings for home grown talent, remains to be seen. As a rule, academic positions are incredibly competitive - more so for philosophy (of all stripes) than most subjects.
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msteps
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Thanks for the advice. I'll start considering publishing something, as you suggested.
(Original post by gjd800)
Royal Holloway has a Continental slant and has a good department regardless of what people on here will quip about the institution in general. Warwick also has good continental coverage and do a cont degree, but this is unusual. King's has a good continental slant, too. Dundee are so-so for it. Maybe Southampton. You aren't usually gonna get a 'Continental Philosophy' degree, you are usually only gonna get places that cover it in more detail than others.

Not that it really matters. You are gonna have to do your own digging on this and get into some syllabi, I suppose, to see what you really fancy.

In response to the second question, the answer to are institutions looking for academics is a broad 'no'. It is incredibly difficult to get into a philosophy dept as a fresh PhD holder (and you will have to have a PhD). The best way to build a profile to make it more likely is to publish and get funded. Both of these will help greatly. I first published when I was an undergraduate and did again during my Master's -- this was the main reason that I got a funded PhD, and the funded PhD (and niche expertise, I suppose) is the man reason that I fell into work. Depts like that you can out 'AHRC funded scholarship' on your CV because it allegedly speaks to the quality of the person they are recruiting. Of course, it doesn't really do that, but this is how these admin-orientated, target-obsessed depts think. For me, getting into a dept was more luck than design and that has also been the experience of most of my peers that actually found some work during or post-doctorate. If you do find work you will likely also find yourself on *****y fractional contracts for a while, so security isn't fab.

The poster above is talking about lib arts but that's not the same a philosophy degree, which is a rigorous course and is suitably respected as such (apart from by some of the STEM master racer 18 year old plonkers on here). Lib arts is seen as a weak, wishy-washy subject over here, fairly or no.
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msteps
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That's just what I was looking for. Thank you! Good luck with your MA.
(Original post by FoucaultMyGawd!)
Essex, Staffordshire, Warwick, Dundee, Kingston, Sussex, Royal Holloway, and Goldsmiths all provide entirely continental philosophy degrees (some also offer analytic if you're looking for a mixed bag). There are probably others - those are just the institutions I looked at.I think your best bet is to check out a syllabus or two and see what the various professors specialise in and pick what floats your boat that way. I'm in the last few months of an MA in continental philosophy at Staffordshire, and it's been great.Regarding your questions about academia - I'm not well positioned to answer them. I would say that there is much more continental philosophy available in the UK today than there was when I did my first degree (a decade ago). Whether that trend will continue, and whether it will result in job openings for home grown talent, remains to be seen. As a rule, academic positions are incredibly competitive - more so for philosophy (of all stripes) than most subjects.
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Staffordshire University
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(Original post by msteps)
That's just what I was looking for. Thank you! Good luck with your MA.
Hi msteps

As FoucaultMyGawd! mentioned, we do run a Continental Philosophy Masters - you can find all the info you need here.

If that sounds good, we'd recommend coming along to one of our postgraduate open days. You'll be able to chat to the lecturers and should get a good feel for the uni and the course. The next one is 22 May - you can sign up here.

Please give us a shout if we can help with anything else.

Thanks

Amy
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