Hypertrophy when exercising at home Watch

tomTSi
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I'm a 20 year old male, been exercising at home since October after previously not doing much at all. I'm trying to get a better chest cause I'm quite self conscious about it and arms because they're quite skinny. I'm not really interested in fitness, only really doing it for increased self-esteem.

I initially started with 5kg dumbbells and was just trying to go that extra bit more every session (I exercise every other day so muscles have time to recover). It was getting to the point where I was finding it quite difficult to wear myself out and workouts were becoming too time consuming, so I bought some new 10kg weights.

When researching how much I should increase my reps each day I found out that if you're trying to get bigger you should be doing 10-15 reps max, and that anything more than that will only lead to "muscular endurance". This was really disappointing to me cause I assumed I could just increase my reps every week and just get bigger. This is my current workout:

Ab Wheel: 41
Chair Dips: 70
Dumbell Pullover (Both 10kg dumbbells): 5
Crush press (Both 10kg dumbbells): 15
Lying leg raise: 26
Bench press: 26
Crush press (again): 15
Bench press (again -- with dumbbells facing sideways): 26
Dumbell Pullover (Again -- Both 10kg dumbbells): 5
Bent over Dumbell row: 30
Rear Delt flyes (5kg dumbbells): 16
Dumbells: 26
Push ups: 41

So hypothetically if I were to keep gradually increasing this, say where I was doing double of everything, I would not get much bigger? I could always buy heavier dumbbells again, or maybe buy some adjustable ones, but I feel like this is quite expensive and wouldn't be the same as a gradual increase I would get from using the weights at the gym.

For various reasons, I don't want to join a gym until I graduate, so my question really is what's the best thing to do in the time being -- should I continue building up muscular endurance if I plan to start high intensity workouts in a few months time?
0
reply
Kvothe the Arcane
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by tomTSi)
I'm a 20 year old male, been exercising at home since October after previously not doing much at all. I'm trying to get a better chest cause I'm quite self conscious about it and arms because they're quite skinny. I'm not really interested in fitness, only really doing it for increased self-esteem.

I initially started with 5kg dumbbells and was just trying to go that extra bit more every session (I exercise every other day so muscles have time to recover). It was getting to the point where I was finding it quite difficult to wear myself out and workouts were becoming too time consuming, so I bought some new 10kg weights.

When researching how much I should increase my reps each day I found out that if you're trying to get bigger you should be doing 10-15 reps max, and that anything more than that will only lead to "muscular endurance". This was really disappointing to me cause I assumed I could just increase my reps every week and just get bigger. This is my current workout:

Ab Wheel: 41
Chair Dips: 70
Dumbell Pullover (Both 10kg dumbbells): 5
Crush press (Both 10kg dumbbells): 15
Lying leg raise: 26
Bench press: 26
Crush press (again): 15
Bench press (again -- with dumbbells facing sideways): 26
Dumbell Pullover (Again -- Both 10kg dumbbells): 5
Bent over Dumbell row: 30
Rear Delt flyes (5kg dumbbells): 16
Dumbells: 26
Push ups: 41

So hypothetically if I were to keep gradually increasing this, say where I was doing double of everything, I would not get much bigger? I could always buy heavier dumbbells again, or maybe buy some adjustable ones, but I feel like this is quite expensive and wouldn't be the same as a gradual increase I would get from using the weights at the gym.

For various reasons, I don't want to join a gym until I graduate, so my question really is what's the best thing to do in the time being -- should I continue building up muscular endurance if I plan to start high intensity workouts in a few months time?
Honestly speaking 10kg is very light. Any increase in ease is probably due to neural adaptations. If you're concerned about equipment cost, maybe you can consider a calisthenic programme with progressions for each type of exercises.
For example, the recommended routine over at r/bodyweightfitness.

And to get bigger, don't forget you have to eat more.
0
reply
funk controller
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
The rep range for hypertrophy is 8-12, anything outside of this is not optimal for hypertrophy, especially if above the rep range. Your best bet is to join a gym, can't think of a reason you would be unable to. Second to this would be a calisthenics routine while adding weight onto your body, but it's not the same as going to a gym.
Also check that you're doing the exercises right, I doubt that you can do 41 ab rollouts unless you're really light, so you could be at risk of injury.
0
reply
tomTSi
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
Honestly speaking 10kg is very light. Any increase in ease is probably due to neural adaptations. If you're concerned about equipment cost, maybe you can consider a calisthenic programme with progressions for each type of exercises.
For example, the recommended routine over at r/bodyweightfitness.

And to get bigger, don't forget you have to eat more.
(Original post by funk controller)
The rep range for hypertrophy is 8-12, anything outside of this is not optimal for hypertrophy, especially if above the rep range. Your best bet is to join a gym, can't think of a reason you would be unable to. Second to this would be a calisthenics routine while adding weight onto your body, but it's not the same as going to a gym.
Also check that you're doing the exercises right, I doubt that you can do 41 ab rollouts unless you're really light, so you could be at risk of injury.
I'm doing ab wheel on my knees cause I don't have a bench, which I think is easier, but can defo do 41. I weigh just over 72kg.

Thanks for letting me know about the calisthenics thing. I have a dumb question about that though: how do I know how to increase the amount of exercise/reps I do with a calisthenics workout? Is the idea that I don't increase the amount of exercise I do that much but as I get heavier the workout will get more difficult? Kinda confused about this. I think this might work for me in the time being before I join a gym.
0
reply
Kvothe the Arcane
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by tomTSi)
I'm doing ab wheel on my knees cause I don't have a bench, which I think is easier, but can defo do 41. I weigh just over 72kg.

Thanks for letting me know about the calisthenics thing. I have a dumb question about that though: how do I know how to increase the amount of exercise/reps I do with a calisthenics workout? Is the idea that I don't increase the amount of exercise I do that much but as I get heavier the workout will get more difficult? Kinda confused about this. I think this might work for me in the time being before I join a gym.
With calisthenics, the idea is that you do different exercises. So with pushups you might progress from fake knee pushups to regular pushups to diamond pushups with the hardest of that progression being planche pushups. It's the idea of progressive overload. People usually accomplish this at the gym by increasing the weight in workout sessions.
0
reply
funk controller
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by tomTSi)
I'm doing ab wheel on my knees cause I don't have a bench, which I think is easier, but can defo do 41. I weigh just over 72kg.

Thanks for letting me know about the calisthenics thing. I have a dumb question about that though: how do I know how to increase the amount of exercise/reps I do with a calisthenics workout? Is the idea that I don't increase the amount of exercise I do that much but as I get heavier the workout will get more difficult? Kinda confused about this. I think this might work for me in the time being before I join a gym.
yo thats wild then, I'm 77kg and I've got pretty strong abs but can only do 8 in a single set before my form breaks down and my back starts to curve but if you know you're doing them right then sure, worth a check though.

Bodyweight is never accounted for when choosing a weight to do something at, not at the gym with weights, not with calisthenics. While you will get heavier, it'll get easier because some of that weight will be muscle that'll help move the weight. Just try to add enough weight that it's challenging to do 3 sets of 8-12 reps, I'm not entirely sure what exercises to do to hit all the muscles with calisthenics though. Push ups (both chest and tricep dominant variations), pull ups (standard and wide grip), chin ups (standard and neutral grip), squats (there is no way you'll have enough weight to do 8-12 for your legs without weights).
I've got no idea what you could do to hit your lower back and hamstrings though.
Additionally, you could try cycling and sprinting for your quads and calves, ever seen a track cyclists legs?
Seeing as you have light weights at home, you would also be able to do some lower weight gym workouts like lateral raises, front raises, chest flyes, tricep kickbacks.
Last edited by funk controller; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (64)
15.42%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (42)
10.12%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (78)
18.8%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (60)
14.46%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (45)
10.84%
How can I be the best version of myself? (126)
30.36%

Watched Threads

View All