foxstudy
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as above.
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Max1989
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#2
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terrestrial, amphibians are aquatic.
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username2889812
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#3
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(Original post by foxstudy)
as above.
Thought reptiles usually crawled on land.
do you think they could be present in water too?:hmmmm:
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foxstudy
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(Original post by Max1989)
terrestrial, amphibians are aquatic.
I thought amphibians are, when young, aquatic but as they grow older they become terrestrial.
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username2889812
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(Original post by foxstudy)
I thought amphibians are, when young, aquatic but as they grow older they become terrestrial.
In the case of frogs yeah...but there's a reason why they are amphi...both
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Max1989
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(Original post by foxstudy)
I thought amphibians are, when young, aquatic but as they grow older they become terrestrial.
The whole point of amphibians is that they must keep their skin moist so that they do not dry out and therefore must submerge in water/live in humid climates.
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Max1989
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(Original post by Max1989)
The whole point of amphibians is that they must keep their skin moist so that they do not dry out and therefore must submerge in water/live in humid climates.
(Original post by Spannerin'moi)
In the case of frogs yeah...but there's a reason why they are amphi...both
But yeah they are kinda both, but reptiles are very much terrestrial.
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foxstudy
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(Original post by Max1989)
But yeah they are kinda both, but reptiles are very much terrestrial.
(Original post by Spannerin'moi)
In the case of frogs yeah...but there's a reason why they are amphi...both
Ahh makes more sense, thank you !
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(Original post by foxstudy)
as above.
Reptiles can be land-based (tortoises, lizards) or water-based (alligators, crocodiles, turtles).
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username2889812
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#10
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(Original post by Max1989)
But yeah they are kinda both, but reptiles are very much terrestrial.
Yet there are always exceptions...for instance crocodiles are semi aquatic yet they aren't amphibians but reptiles...
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(Original post by Max1989)
terrestrial, amphibians are aquatic.
Perhaps you could explain crocodiles, alligators and turtles, which are all reptiles and all live in water, then?
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Reptiles can be land-based (tortoises, lizards) or water-based (alligators, crocodiles, turtles).
That's in a gist!
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Max1989
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Perhaps you could explain crocodiles, alligators and turtles, which are all reptiles and all live in water, then?
Turtles are amphibians, crocodiles and alligators are an exception, they are reptiles as they do not 'need' to be in water, it's just their hunting style and bodies has developed to utilize water, they can quiet happily survive without it but they would probably fail at hunting.
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Max1989
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(Original post by Max1989)
Turtles are amphibians, crocodiles and alligators are an exception, they are reptiles as they do not 'need' to be in water, it's just their hunting style and bodies has developed to utilize water, they can quiet happily survive without it but they would probably fail at hunting.
I didn't say reptiles cannot go in water, it is just they are land dwelling animals, humans can go in water but live on land.
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(Original post by Max1989)
Turtles are amphibians
Er, no. They are reptiles. You have not studied much biology, have you?
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(Original post by Max1989)
I didn't say reptiles cannot go in water, it is just they are land dwelling animals
Turtles spend most of their lives in water.
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Violet Femme
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(Original post by Max1989)
I didn't say reptiles cannot go in water, it is just they are land dwelling animals, humans can go in water but live on land.
Aside from some of the other examples listed, you’ve clearly never heard of sea snakes.

That people can get such a basic question wrong shows how poor science education is in this country,
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Max1989
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Er, no. They are reptiles. You have not studied much biology, have you?
Yeah I sorry that my mistake, they are indeed reptiles but they do live a lot in water and have developed to live in water, so are a bit of a on the fence species, sorry. And we do not cover animal types in biology, I am not a vet, just going off intuition.
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Max1989
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(Original post by Violet Femme)
Aside from some of the other examples listed, you’ve clearly never heard of sea snakes.

That people can get such a basic question wrong shows how poor science education is in this country,
Indeeds, there are exceptions.
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#20
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(Original post by Max1989)
so are a bit of a on the fence species,
You are thinking of birds, which perch on fences frequently. I would pay good money to see a turtle on a fence.
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