Would you consider training to be a teacher when you graduate? Watch

Poll: I'm considering teacher training when I graduate
Yes - I am interested in teaching (167)
23.52%
No - I don't want to be a teacher (543)
76.48%
She-Ra
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Are you interested in training to be a teacher?

The Department for Education have asked us to chat to you about why you are or are not interested.

Please respond to our poll and post your responses to the questions below (whichever is most appropriate to you). Sharing your thoughts and views on this will be highly valued.

If you are interested in teaching can you share your thoughts on:

- What attracts you to teaching?

If you aren't interested in teaching please can you share why?

- What is the main reason you wouldn't consider training to be a teacher?

Please be as honest as possible

Thanks everyone
Last edited by She-Ra; 4 weeks ago
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swelshie
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I considered becoming a secondary school teacher (PGDE physics/technology or similar). However I was unable to meet the entry requirements for the course as I needed at least 3 weeks work experience in a school with a reference. I was working full time so was unable to gain this requirement without quitting my job and volunteering or somehow getting a job as a classroom assistant etc. Seemed too much of a risk at the time as I was not sure if it was a career for me.

I had also come across a lot of negative experiences with people saying it typically involves long hours, lots of stress etc. Apparently there is a high dropout rate for the PGDE courses as well. I had been interested in teaching as I have a passion for the kinds of things that would be in the syllabus, and I believe I am good at explaining complex/challenging information as simply as possible, a skill gained from doing an engineering degree.
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Paracosm
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Are you interested in training to be a teacher?
Sorta!

The Department for Education have asked us to chat to you about why you are or are not interested.

Please respond to our poll and post your responses to the questions below (whichever is most appropriate to you).

If you are interested in teaching can you share your thoughts on:

- What attracts you to teaching?
As you have asked for honesty.... the tax-free bursary is a pretty convincing thing... I also enjoy my specialism a lot and think that it'd be fun and interesting to teach it.

If you aren't interested in teaching please can you share why?

- What is the main reason you wouldn't consider training to be a teacher?

Please be as honest as possible

Thanks everyone
Again, with emphasis on honesty... the education system and the expectations of teachers from a DfE/regulatory body perspective is simply ridiculous. Education is increasingly becoming focused on stats, attainment and analysis of these numbers to see how they can be shown in a more favourable light as opposed to focusing on providing a useful and engaging curriculum which provides students with the tools they need to gain a real-world understanding of their subjects, rather than keywords and ticking arbitrary boxes defined by exam boards. It is often bordering nonsense when considering how outdated some subjects such as GCSE Computing's syllabus are.

Education has and continues along the path of glorified memory-based retention and regurgitation of information and keywords. It is not by any means comparable to the standard of education at an undergraduate or postgraduate level. This may seem like a jump, but I honestly feel that given the right mindset and approach that post-secondary styles of teaching could easily be employed in a secondary environment and that it would encourage self-directed study and interest in the subject. Sadly, all the education system seems to be interested in is targets, statistics and spreadsheets. Boring. This and the ridiculous pressures on both teachers and SLT (to enforce these standards set by the government/regulatory bodies) will likely be why if I choose to train that I give it up after my required engagement. It's simply not worth the money you're paid for all of the stresses and pressures put upon you.

*This isn't to say there's a 'one size fits all' solution to this problem, but then again, this clarification highlights another problem with our education system: forcing a certain model of education on all students and being surprised for some reason that different styles of learning exist, yet refusing to adapt to them. All the while, blaming the teacher when a student underperforms due to their lack of natural ability to engage in the learning style or topic in the way it was presented to them.
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CoolCavy
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:nope:

If i were to teach anything it would be art or product design but i dont really like how they are taught in KS3, i am of the opinion that art well you cant really teach it, you can teach the technique but you cant with the raw talent or ability. So then you get stuck with a load of kids who cant draw and dont want to be there but have to be there because it's on their timetable so then they play up and get naughty which disrupts the other kids. There is just not enough creativity in it either, the sit behind a desk and paint approach just stifles flair and creativity and sort of 'schedules' it which you cant really do. Idk what the alternative would be but no i dont like how it's taught.
I also dont think i could be a teacher just because im not maternal at all and whilst you dont have to adopt the kids you do have to care for them somewhat and i just dont like them they almost scare me a bit.
And lastly for MH reasons, i am just not stable enough to be a teacher, things the kids would do would trigger me and then yeh that's a recipe for disaster.
I think being alone in a quiet study doing illustration suits me much more
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8472
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I considered it for a time and the head of IT said i'd be ideal as I she had let me do a lot of in class teaching for GCSEs. The bursary would have been great but eventually the realism kind of hits. So many complaints from teachers now about funding and difficulty dealing/managing with the ongoing changes. It just put me off. At least if im going to put up with those i'd like to be paid fairly like I would in a big company :dontknow:
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entertainmyfaith
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am considering primary school teaching partly because there'll always be a demand for teachers, though secondary school teaching doesn't appeal to me one bit:lol:
i do like the idea that you'll probably always be surrounded by people though i can imagine it gets exhausting especially if you have a difficult class or don't 'click' with the other staff. education system is massively focused on reaching certain targets and stats at the mo so even as a primary school teacher, i'd probably have to teach in a way that contributes to targets etc though perhaps in the younger years there's less of a focus on these things as ya know, they're still growing and learning how to learn.
teachers'll never get enough credit and support for what they do really, so it doesn't surprise me that so many are dropping out or decide to leave teaching.
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MinaBee
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I'm definitely considering it. However, I'm not sure if I'd do it right after I graduate as I don't want to leave education just to go straight back in to it (if that makes sense ).

I love the idea of making an impact on young people's lives and being able to share the interest and enthusiasm I have for my subject. The horror stories you can find when googling do put me off a bit though along with the fact that the subject I would want to teach (languages) aren't really taken seriously in this country.

Another thing that puts me off is student behaviour. I know it's dependent on the school but watching other students in my secondary school classes torment the teachers and seeing how much effort the teachers themselves had to go through just to get the class to stop talking and listen for 5 minutes was awful. A part of me feels like I wouldn't be able to handle that.

I still have a few years to think about it so we'll see.
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shadowdweller
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I'd consider it one day - I like the idea of interesting kids in a subject, and I'd probably want to teach programming/CompSci or similar which I think is a super important skill to have. Right now I'm more content in a development role though.
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furryface12
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I'm thinking about it. I definitely want to do something involving children that I can make a difference to their lives in. In an ideal world yes, this would probably be teaching. But the workload is insane and I'd never feel like I could do enough even working 24/7. It's inflexible and you have to follow whatever whim the current government feels like might gain them some votes, not what is best for the kids. Add to this complex health conditions and things start getting really quite difficult- even with adjustments etc I just couldn't do it. I have no idea how they'll change in the future but it's unlikely that I'll ever not be living with chronic illness to some extent. Maybe I'll still end up giving it a go, I would like to, but I'm really not convinced it's the best thing for me all things considered.
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gjd800
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Thought about being a secondary-level or college-level teacher but honesty, the two things that really swung it for me are that the syllabi are restrictive, and the kids can be problematic. I just couldn't be arsed.

I can teach in the universities doing stuff I enjoy (I've designed two modules myself already) with students that broadly want to be there, or who will just not come if they don't - and as a bonus the earning potential is better.
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1secondsofvamps
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Its exactly what im planning on doing. My undergrad is Early childhood studies, once i graduate im hoping to do a PGCE in EYFS/KS1.

I absolutely adore children. In early years/primary, not only do you teach, but you are also there for their holistic development. I love the idea of being there for them and making that positive change in their lives.

The lack of funding/bursaries in primary teaching, workload, salary etc has not put me off teaching.
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Are you interested in training to be a teacher?

The Department for Education have asked us to chat to you about why you are or are not interested.

Please respond to our poll and post your responses to the questions below (whichever is most appropriate to you). Sharing your thoughts and views on this will be highly valued.

If you are interested in teaching can you share your thoughts on:

- What attracts you to teaching?

If you aren't interested in teaching please can you share why?

- What is the main reason you wouldn't consider training to be a teacher?

Please be as honest as possible

Thanks everyone
I think the attraction to teaching for me is really just an innate sense of wanting to share knowledge and to inspire others to learn. I also enjoy providing support, career advice and personal advice to students. I mainly wouldn't consider teaching in schools as my specialism is vocational and not taught in schools. I'm passionate about nursing and healthcare which is only taught at university level or some colleges, however I have considered teaching so will add my thoughts.

I think if I was to teach in a school, I would likely go into English teaching, however I'm very aware that teachers are under tremendous pressure, stress and often have to work ridiculous hours outside of their paid work day from the experience of friends/acquaintances who are in the career at the moment. A work life balance is extremely important to me for my own mental wellbeing and I don't feel I could get that whilst teaching. I'd also be quite concerned about progression and pay. I think teaching the same syllabus with little to no scope for creativity or tailored learning would be pretty dismal and wouldn't make me passionate about going into work every day.

Behaviour is another major issue for me in terms of teaching. I had a horrendous time at school with bullying and I personally feel that being in a school environment would be too much for me. I've seen that teachers can also be bullied pretty extremely and I wouldn't be willing to put myself through that. I realise there are behaviour management skills etc. but, honestly, I don't believe that these can really work with children who want to be malicious and bully. There are plenty of jobs that give me satisfaction and allow me to teach in some capacity that would not involve dealing with idiotic behaviour from disinterested students.

Ultimately, I would like to go into teaching, but at a further education level, possibly as a lecturer. The main appeal of this to me is to work with more mature students who actually want to be in that educational setting and have a passion for the subject. I also think this offers more scope for creativity and pursuing other interests such as research. I think there is also much more scope for professional development.
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-Eirlys-
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Are you interested in training to be a teacher?

The Department for Education have asked us to chat to you about why you are or are not interested.

Please respond to our poll and post your responses to the questions below (whichever is most appropriate to you). Sharing your thoughts and views on this will be highly valued.

If you are interested in teaching can you share your thoughts on:

- What attracts you to teaching?

If you aren't interested in teaching please can you share why?

- What is the main reason you wouldn't consider training to be a teacher?

Please be as honest as possible

Thanks everyone
I'm not interested in it because most jobs are in high school and I know how terrible teachers can be treated by kids. I don't think I could live with that stress every day. They don't seem to get paid all that much either for what they have to put up with. My auntie worked in a high school and she hated it; the kids were so naughty, she just couldn't get anything done and she looked so stressed. She now teachers older people and young adults which is a more pleasant experience but even when she finishes work, she has loads of marking to do. It doesn't seem to have a good work/life balance.

I am more interested in a 9-5 job that when I get home, the work stays at work. There are jobs that offer this, with less stress too!
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Muttley79
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The DfE need to scrap the 'Teach Frst' scheme - it doesn't work. Some of us teachers regard it as insulting ie 'Teach First before you do a proper job' - the support trainees get is laughable in many schools.

Raise the profile of 'ordinary' teachers and listen to us -
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04MR17
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Always wanted to teach, still do.

Reasons: young people are fairly easily influenced, one of the biggest influencers on large numbers of children and young people are teachers. The way they are influenced at that stage affect their mental wellbeing, career plans, political beliefs, social understandings, personal ambition. I'd rather have a positive impact on those things than potentially have somebody else do that job and not have as positive an impact.

Other reasons?
Just have a look at this TSR article:
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/lif...eacher-and-why

What puts me off?

The lack of trust. Teachers are put under huge pressure by managers who are put under huge pressure by a marketised system driven by meaningless results which don't help our children. Teachers should be left to teach with more freedom, they are trained, they should be trusted to do their job without being micromanaged by the state, because it crushes some of them emotionally, and it doesn't nothing for the students.
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Decahedron
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Ridiculously hard work for little pay and appalling working conditions. All of which isn't helped by the constant cuts to the education budget.
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esrever
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I would love to teach but for a social cause rather than as a full time profession
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ChaoticButterfly
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I don't want to be a disciplinarian is probably my main reason.
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ThatOldGuy
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I am interested in being a teacher. I want to make a difference. That said, there are a huge amount of drawbacks to being a teacher.

1) OFSTED expects you to teach to a test. Inspiring passion in your students when you're teaching them how to pass a test is difficult; Without passion, teaching becomes drudgework.
2) Teachers spend an inordinate amount of time filling out forms that nobody will read in detail. More time is spent doing paperwork as a teacher than is spent with the actual students.
3) Teachers have no power to actually teach: Without the support of parents and the government, teacher impact is reduced considerably.

Ultimately, people in the teaching profession recognise that career politicians care very little for teaching. It is not an endeavour that will ever provide short-term gains. When you're talking about 4 year cycles, something that takes 14+ years to make a real difference is placed in minimal priority. Career politicians want to appear to care about education, since not doing so can lose them elections, but actually caring about them requires an investment in time and energy that career politicians are unlikely to be able to provide.

Speak to teachers. See what they feel about OFSTED and the centralised curriculum. Join the evidence-based teaching network that follows where evidence rather than political expedience shows students will want to go. Give options. Listen to feedback. Figure out what you want from education and what you're willing to invest. Provide us with answers to what you want and are willing to invest in education and we can provide much more useful feedback.

Does the Department for Education intend to provide the opportunity for face-to-face discussions? Or is this more 'We want to know if giving an extra £2000 will get enough teachers in'.
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Violet Femme
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Absolutely not. It's badly paid and poor work conditions. That so many graduates go through teacher training only to leave the profession after a couple of years should be a big red flag to anyone considering it.
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