Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi, I’m currently in year 11 and i need to choose my A levels next week but I’m not sure whether to do chemistry or philosophy so I was wondering if anyone has any advice? I know that I want to do maths, further maths and physics, just not sure about the fourth. I really like both subjects, so idk which one to pick. For anyone one that does chemistry, how much of a step up is it from GCSE, and is the content quite different? And with philosophy, is it a little like RS GCSE or nah? Thanks so much )
0
reply
username4504428
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by Lexi4096)
Hi, I’m currently in year 11 and i need to choose my A levels next week but I’m not sure whether to do chemistry or philosophy so I was wondering if anyone has any advice? I know that I want to do maths, further maths and physics, just not sure about the fourth. I really like both subjects, so idk which one to pick. For anyone one that does chemistry, how much of a step up is it from GCSE, and is the content quite different? And with philosophy, is it a little like RS GCSE or nah? Thanks so much )
Obviously if your going for sciences chemistry opens many options for you and is really valued.


But at the same time its really hard. I am predicted an A* in chemistry. AS stuff is very similar to GCSEs however topics in A2 are really hard and very complicated. Like you would have stuff like transition chemistry, organic chemistry and acid-base equilibria and Energetics too. All of them are hard. And they take up a lot of time aswell.
1
reply
randomsheep11
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
Chemistry would really open a lot of doors for you. If you ever decide you have an interest in subjects like Medicine/Pharmacy/Dentistry/Veterinary Science, Chemistry is the subject you actually need. Plus, Chemistry is needed if you ever want to become a Chemical Engineer, which Is a very good career.

I do A Level Chemistry, and the initial jump wasn't that bad. If you can recap on some basic mol calculations, you will be fine with the first inorganic topics. On the other hand, organic chemistry is quite a jump from GCSE, but I promise it's not bad once you get taught the different rules and naming systems.

I really enjoy Chemistry
1
reply
Deggs_14
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
The jump between a level chemistry and gcse chemistry isn’t that hard, it picks up throughout the year though but then it’s not really noticeable. The first month or so you’ll cover the atomic theory, the periodic table, and calculations etc that you did at GCSE. However you’re introduced to new concepts such as First IE, Electron Orbitals and Nomenclature. I really struggled with these at first, but after a while you’ll pick it up and then it becomes satisfying once you can name loads of compounds. Have a flick through an a level chemistry textbook and the same with law and see if the content interests you.
1
reply
Liverpool Hope University
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Lexi4096)
Hi, I’m currently in year 11 and i need to choose my A levels next week but I’m not sure whether to do chemistry or philosophy so I was wondering if anyone has any advice? I know that I want to do maths, further maths and physics, just not sure about the fourth. I really like both subjects, so idk which one to pick. For anyone one that does chemistry, how much of a step up is it from GCSE, and is the content quite different? And with philosophy, is it a little like RS GCSE or nah? Thanks so much )
Hi Lexi

My advice would be to look at careers you potentially want to get into and see if they require specific A-Levels. With your other A Levels, you may find chemistry to be more similar. Philosophy is assessed by essay writing. I studied philosophy as part of a combined course at university and I can tell you that philosophy is a really interesting subject to study. You will be learning about truth and reality and ethics/morality.

Hope you figure out what to study.

Dom :thumbsup:
1
reply
Stratx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Chemistry>Philosophy for job opportunities. You can do chemical engineering, dentistry, medicine, veterinary science. It seems like you are also doing other STEM subjects, so Chemistry may help with other ones, particularly physics. Maybe write yourself a pros and cons list of each one and pick out the best pros and cons from the thread. Philosophy may open up the option of doing essay subjects at university. Career-wise, chemistry may be the safer of the two. It's difficult but enjoyable.
1
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Tommaine)
Obviously if your going for sciences chemistry opens many options for you and is really valued.


But at the same time its really hard. I am predicted an A* in chemistry. AS stuff is very similar to GCSEs however topics in A2 are really hard and very complicated. Like you would have stuff like transition chemistry, organic chemistry and acid-base equilibria and Energetics too. All of them are hard. And they take up a lot of time aswell.
Hi, thanks for your reply! I’ve heard Chemistry can be quite difficult and I’m predicted a 9 at GCSE but I know that it probably doesn’t mean much since A level is much harder. Would you say that the course is enjoyable?
0
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by randomsheep11)
Chemistry would really open a lot of doors for you. If you ever decide you have an interest in subjects like Medicine/Pharmacy/Dentistry/Veterinary Science, Chemistry is the subject you actually need. Plus, Chemistry is needed if you ever want to become a Chemical Engineer, which Is a very good career.

I do A Level Chemistry, and the initial jump wasn't that bad. If you can recap on some basic mol calculations, you will be fine with the first inorganic topics. On the other hand, organic chemistry is quite a jump from GCSE, but I promise it's not bad once you get taught the different rules and naming systems.

I really enjoy Chemistry
I’m glad to hear it’s still enjoyable! Chemistry does seem very useful, so I will bear that in mind. Thanks for the help
0
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Deggs_14)
The jump between a level chemistry and gcse chemistry isn’t that hard, it picks up throughout the year though but then it’s not really noticeable. The first month or so you’ll cover the atomic theory, the periodic table, and calculations etc that you did at GCSE. However you’re introduced to new concepts such as First IE, Electron Orbitals and Nomenclature. I really struggled with these at first, but after a while you’ll pick it up and then it becomes satisfying once you can name loads of compounds. Have a flick through an a level chemistry textbook and the same with law and see if the content interests you.
That’s a good idea, I’ll try to have a look a both textbooks, only problem is we have to make our decisions first day back at school, but I’ll see if any family friends study those subjects. Is there a lot of maths involved in chemistry A level? Because that’s my strength so I’m hoping there is!
0
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Liverpool Hope University)
Hi Lexi

My advice would be to look at careers you potentially want to get into and see if they require specific A-Levels. With your other A Levels, you may find chemistry to be more similar. Philosophy is assessed by essay writing. I studied philosophy as part of a combined course at university and I can tell you that philosophy is a really interesting subject to study. You will be learning about truth and reality and ethics/morality.

Hope you figure out what to study.

Dom :thumbsup:
Thank you for your advice! I know that I definitely want to do maths at university (hopefully at oxbridge), but I’m not sure about my career after that. I think philosophy is a really interesting subject, and I thought that maybe doing an essay based subject would add some variety to my choices, maybe helping to make my application stand out as someone who isn’t only a science/maths person. However, I tend to take a really long time on essays, so do philosophy would probably take up a lot of my time!
0
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Stratx)
Chemistry>Philosophy for job opportunities. You can do chemical engineering, dentistry, medicine, veterinary science. It seems like you are also doing other STEM subjects, so Chemistry may help with other ones, particularly physics. Maybe write yourself a pros and cons list of each one and pick out the best pros and cons from the thread. Philosophy may open up the option of doing essay subjects at university. Career-wise, chemistry may be the safer of the two. It's difficult but enjoyable.
I have strong pros and cons for each one, which only makes the decision harder! I find both interesting, but I know that chemistry would be better for job opportunities as you said. On the other hand, I think philosophy would add some variety to my choices, and maybe help me to stand out in my university application as someone is is not just a science/maths person. However, essays always take me so long to write, so philosophy would probably take up a lot of my time!
0
reply
username4504428
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Lexi4096)
Hi, thanks for your reply! I’ve heard Chemistry can be quite difficult and I’m predicted a 9 at GCSE but I know that it probably doesn’t mean much since A level is much harder. Would you say that the course is enjoyable?
I loved the course
0
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Tommaine)
I loved the course
That’s good to hear!
0
reply
humean
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by Lexi4096)
Hi, I’m currently in year 11 and i need to choose my A levels next week but I’m not sure whether to do chemistry or philosophy so I was wondering if anyone has any advice? I know that I want to do maths, further maths and physics, just not sure about the fourth. I really like both subjects, so idk which one to pick. For anyone one that does chemistry, how much of a step up is it from GCSE, and is the content quite different? And with philosophy, is it a little like RS GCSE or nah? Thanks so much )
I'm currently doing maths, further maths chemistry and RS for a level (in year 13)!!

For chemistry, if you did triple science, the jump to AS isn't a lot. The jump from AS to A2 is a much bigger, but I wouldn't worry about that less. Some of the material, such as organic, will seem familiar, other areas will be completely new. In terms of workloads, Chemistry definitely has a lesser workload than philosophy. Each board has different content for philosophy/RS but I'd imagine that non matter what board you're doing, it will involve a lot of reading and essay writing. There is certainly a jump between GCSE and level for philosophy. Mainly because what you do at GCSE is very basic and in my opinion quite dry in comparison to a level. If you studied things like the cosmological, design argument at GCSE, you will probably (certainly in the case of RS) revisit those, but study them in more detail. Personally, I love philosophy (going to do it at uni) and so I really think the a level is worth it. However, it is a lot of work so if you think you'll find it interesting, do it!! I also think that with your other subjects, you'll be able to bring some really insightful comments to discussions.

Whilst many people say that you're more likely to get a job with chemistry a level, I think the fact you're doing maths, fm and physics is impressive enough. Also, it can be quite handy to have an essay subject, especially philosophy, because it teaches you how to structure arguments and analyse things in a very particular way.

But ultimately, go for the subject that you'll think you'll have a better time studying - a levels are tough and I think it really helps to love what you're doing

Good luck!!
1
reply
Lexi4096
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by humean)
I'm currently doing maths, further maths chemistry and RS for a level (in year 13)!!

For chemistry, if you did triple science, the jump to AS isn't a lot. The jump from AS to A2 is a much bigger, but I wouldn't worry about that less. Some of the material, such as organic, will seem familiar, other areas will be completely new. In terms of workloads, Chemistry definitely has a lesser workload than philosophy. Each board has different content for philosophy/RS but I'd imagine that non matter what board you're doing, it will involve a lot of reading and essay writing. There is certainly a jump between GCSE and level for philosophy. Mainly because what you do at GCSE is very basic and in my opinion quite dry in comparison to a level. If you studied things like the cosmological, design argument at GCSE, you will probably (certainly in the case of RS) revisit those, but study them in more detail. Personally, I love philosophy (going to do it at uni) and so I really think the a level is worth it. However, it is a lot of work so if you think you'll find it interesting, do it!! I also think that with your other subjects, you'll be able to bring some really insightful comments to discussions.

Whilst many people say that you're more likely to get a job with chemistry a level, I think the fact you're doing maths, fm and physics is impressive enough. Also, it can be quite handy to have an essay subject, especially philosophy, because it teaches you how to structure arguments and analyse things in a very particular way.

But ultimately, go for the subject that you'll think you'll have a better time studying - a levels are tough and I think it really helps to love what you're doing

Good luck!!
Thank you so much for your help! I agree that philosophy is a really interesting subject, so that makes the decision really hard! I think I would enjoy both of them (if not philosophy more), however I know that the workload for philosophy would be much bigger (especially considering that I take so so long to write an essay), and I don’t know how much time I’ll have to spare in sixth form. I think that even if I did choose chemistry, I would still definitely keep up with philosophy, whether that means going to talks or maybe even doing a course outside of school. Thanks again for your advice!
0
reply
Deggs_14
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by Lexi4096)
That’s a good idea, I’ll try to have a look a both textbooks, only problem is we have to make our decisions first day back at school, but I’ll see if any family friends study those subjects. Is there a lot of maths involved in chemistry A level? Because that’s my strength so I’m hoping there is!
You’re right there is a significant amount of maths in a level chemistry.
0
reply
humean
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by Deggs_14)
You’re right there is a significant amount of maths in a level chemistry.
I mean yes and no - like there are quite a few calculations, but speaking from experience you can do very well at maths and still find the maths in chemistry really hard because it's very wordy and you have to understand the chemistry more than the maths (which is effectively just multiplying and dividing). The only thing I really think maths a level helps with in chemistry is that you will have a better understanding of what a log is and know how to solve quadratics (which are optional anyway).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (334)
55.57%
I don't have everything I need (267)
44.43%

Watched Threads

View All