Latin in medicine Watch

abdullah1443
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I am currently studying medicine in Armenia, im studying in english and latin. Theres seems to be a big emphasis on latin, apparantly its the language of medicine and its really importantly needed to succeed in medicine. Is this true??
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
this list may be of interest:

http://www.inrebus.com/medicallatin.php

not all of the terms listed will be used frequently in modern medicine.
1
reply
junior.doctor
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
It’s certainly not really needed in the UK. Most medical students won’t have studied any Latin before medical school. And Latin is not taught at UK medical school. Maybe a bit of Latin is useful in understanding the origin of some terms, but not a big deal here. Sounds like it’s different where you are though.
1
reply
abdullah1443
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by junior.doctor)
It’s certainly not really needed in the UK. Most medical students won’t have studied any Latin before medical school. And Latin is not taught at UK medical school. Maybe a bit of Latin is useful in understanding the origin of some terms, but not a big deal here. Sounds like it’s different where you are though.
Tbf I'm planning to head back to the UK, I needed to know if its important there, now that makes sense. Thank you.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
artful_lounger
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
I thought ancient Greek was more prevalent as a source of medical terminology than Latin...


That aside, ecolier (or other TSR medics, past and present) might be able to comment on his experiences, but I don't know of any medical course in the UK where either Latin or ancient Greek is required to be learned before or on the course, in of itself; obviously some terminology derives from those languages but I highly doubt you will need to study the declension of the terms formally.

It seems a bit beside the point honestly...unless you have an interest in Classics on the side and want to read some Classical literature or philosophy or history in the original language(s)? Obviously if it's part of your course I suppose there's no escaping it, but I'm not aware of it being important for medicine (at least not since the early modern period ) and it's not like doctors only speak to each other in Classical Latin.

I highly doubt it's going to be examinable material on any post-graduation exams either...
Last edited by artful_lounger; 4 weeks ago
1
reply
abdullah1443
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I thought ancient Greek was more prevalent as a source of medical terminology than Latin...


That aside, ecolier (or other TSR medics, past and present) might be able to comment on his experiences, but I don't know of any medical course in the UK where either Latin or ancient Greek is required to be learned before or on the course, in of itself; obviously some terminology derives from those languages but I highly doubt you will need to study the declension of the terms formally.

It seems a bit beside the point honestly...unless you have an interest in Classics on the side and want to read some Classical literature or philosophy or history in the original language(s)? Obviously if it's part of your course I suppose there's no escaping it, but I'm not aware of it being important and it's not like doctors only speak to each other in Classical Latin.
Thank you. You are also right about the Greek, most Latin words are dervived from Greek. Most diseases are in Greek, most anatomy is Latin. But my uni was making it as if doctors would be speaking Latin to each other all over the world. Its probs only Armenia cause it isn't spoken all over the world so they use Latin instead. I wanted to make sure that was the case and it seems so. Thank you!! 😁
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
ecolier
  • TSR Support Team
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I thought ancient Greek was more prevalent as a source of medical terminology than Latin...


That aside, ecolier (or other TSR medics, past and present) might be able to comment on his experiences, but I don't know of any medical course in the UK where either Latin or ancient Greek is required to be learned before or on the course, in of itself; obviously some terminology derives from those languages but I highly doubt you will need to study the declension of the terms formally.

It seems a bit beside the point honestly...unless you have an interest in Classics on the side and want to read some Classical literature or philosophy or history in the original language(s)? Obviously if it's part of your course I suppose there's no escaping it, but I'm not aware of it being important and it's not like doctors only speak to each other in Classical Latin.
Quid vis? Omnes autem invicem latine loqui.

Joking aside, there is definitely no formal requirement for learning Latin or Greek at med school. However my Greek and Latin speaking colleagues do have an advantage at decoding stuff like schizophrenia (Greek) and Delirium Tremens (Latin).

Finally, there are many medical words that are a combination of these 2 languages. There is definitely no need to know them unless you plan to practise in Greece or a purely Latin-speaking country.

(Original post by abdullah1443)
Thank you. You are also right about the Greek, most Latin words are dervived from Greek. Most diseases are in Greek, most anatomy is Latin. But my uni was making it as if doctors would be speaking Latin to each other all over the world. Its probs only Armenia cause it isn't spoken all over the world so they use Latin instead. I wanted to make sure that was the case and it seems so. Thank you!! 😁
If you are practising in the UK there is definitely no need to speak Greek or Latin.
Last edited by ecolier; 4 weeks ago
1
reply
nexttime
  • TSR Support Team
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
There is definitely no UK medical school that has a dedicated latin/greek course. Its a little bit useful if you can understand the reoccurring terms, but you will just pick up the bits you need as you go.
1
reply
Helenia
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
I have an A* in GCSE Latin. It was moderately useful when studying anatomy, but apart from that it's not added anything to my medical career.
1
reply
Kallisto
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by abdullah1443)
I am currently studying medicine in Armenia, im studying in english and latin. Theres seems to be a big emphasis on latin, apparantly its the language of medicine and its really importantly needed to succeed in medicine. Is this true??
Just to speak for my native country (Germany), Latin or another classic language is not required to study medicine - for what I know -, but it has benefits when the study comes to Latin terms to remember and revise. Have no doubts that students without knowledge in Latin are successful in learning these many vocabularies to pass in exams, but it is an advantage for those who got at school.
1
reply
toronto353
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
From my understanding, it used to be a requirement to have studied at least Latin, if not Greek as well before embarking on a medicine course in the UK. However, this was at least a generation or two ago and it isn't the case now. As someone who has studied both languages to a doctoral level and teaches both, I would say if you're going to learn Latin or Greek, simply do it because you enjoy them (yes it is possible!). As Helenia says, it may be moderately useful, but probably no more so than if I'm trying to use Latin or Greek to work out a word I don't know in French for example. Otherwise, you won't be at any disadvantage from not studying either language.
0
reply
abdullah1443
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by Kallisto)
Just to speak for my native country (Germany), Latin or another classic language is not required to study medicine - for what I know -, but it has benefits when the study comes to Latin terms to remember and revise. Have no doubts that students without knowledge in Latin are successful in learning these many vocabularies to pass in exams, but it is an advantage for those who got at school.
Thank you. Because actually another reason I was asking this question was because I thought places like russia and germany etc. (non english speaking countries) learnt in latin. I found out this wasnt the case with russia and now with germany. Thanks 😁😀!!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Kallisto
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by abdullah1443)
Thank you. Because actually another reason I was asking this question was because I thought places like russia and germany etc. (non english speaking countries) learnt in latin. I found out this wasnt the case with russia and now with germany. Thanks 😁😀!!
Oh, in that case it seems I was the spot-on person to give you good advice. That makes me happy! Why did you ask for Russia and Germany, would you like to study there by any chance?
0
reply
abdullah1443
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by Kallisto)
Oh, in that case it seems I was the spot-on person to give you good advice. That makes me happy! Why did you ask for Russia and Germany, would you like to study there by any chance?
Not study, but work there after i finish study. More likely germany not russia if I plan to not work in the uk for some reason, but you never now where the world ends up throwing u, I mean I never thought in a million years I would be studying in Armenia so yeahh..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Solent University
    Postgraduate and Professional Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Mon, 25 Mar '19
  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (149)
18.63%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (79)
9.88%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (135)
16.88%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (114)
14.25%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (78)
9.75%
How can I be the best version of myself? (245)
30.63%

Watched Threads

View All