alex2344
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Hi

I have been offered a place on a Postgraduate Speech and Language Therapy Course.

I have Dyslexia.

Do any other student, or to be student Speech and Language Therapists out there have Dyslexia?

I have found loads of info to help Dyslexic Medical Students, Dentistry Students, Nurses, Physiotherapists, Teachers etc, but there seems to be a distinct lack of info for Dyslexic Speech and Language Therapists.

It would be nice to know that I'm not the only person with Dyslexia embarking on a career in speech and language therapy.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by alex2344)
Hi

I have been offered a place on a Postgraduate Speech and Language Therapy Course.

I have Dyslexia.

Do any other student, or to be student Speech and Language Therapists out there have Dyslexia?

I have found loads of info to help Dyslexic Medical Students, Dentistry Students, Nurses, Physiotherapists, Teachers etc, but there seems to be a distinct lack of info for Dyslexic Speech and Language Therapists.

It would be nice to know that I'm not the only person with Dyslexia embarking on a career in speech and language therapy.
A mature student on my SLT course had pretty severe dyslexia, and she did fine. She made the university aware of it and she was able to do exams in a separate room with extra time.
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Manasijoshi
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The term dyslexia is used to describe a person’s difficulty reading printed words even though he/she has normal intelligence and received appropriate reading instruction.

As speech-language pathologists, we have extensive training and knowledge about phonological skills. Many students with speech sound errors have phonological errors. This means they have trouble understanding which sounds should be put together to form words. They may use phonological processes where they replace one class of sounds with another (such as replacing all long sounds like “s” with short sounds like “t”). These same children with phonological speech errors may have phonological reading problems as well (a.k.a. dyslexia).
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giella
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I know this is a month late but I would be cautious about doing this degree with dyslexia. As the PP says, phonological transcription is a big part of the role. A dyslexic girl on my course nearly failed this and has struggled with the degree in general due to her dyslexia. She says she plans on just avoiding transcription when she finishes but this would be very difficult practically. Even in adults with aphasia you need some transcription skills and most settings will involve at least some transcription.
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AREEE1
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Ok, thanks guys, I’m going to give it a go, I will either be good at it or not, don’t know unless I try!
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Radhajaiswal
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Dyslexia is a learning disorder that involves difficulty reading due to problems identifying speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words.

Symptoms

Signs of Dyslexia can be difficult to recognize before your child enters school, but some early clues may indicate a problem. Once your child reaches school age, your child's teacher may be the first to notice a problem. Severity varies, but the condition often becomes apparent as a child starts learning to read.

Before school Signs that a young child may be at risk of dyslexia include:Late talking Training new words slowly Problems forming words correctly, such as reversing sounds in words or confusing words that sound alike Problems remembering or naming letters, numbers and colors Difficulty learning nursery rhymes or playing rhyming games School age
Once your child is in school, dyslexia signs and symptoms may become more apparent, including:Reading well below the expected level for age Problems processing and understanding what he or she hears Difficulty finding the right word or forming answers to questions Problems remembering the sequence of things Difficulty seeing (and occasionally hearing) similarities and differences in letters and words Inability to sound out the pronunciation of an unfamiliar word Difficulty spelling Spending an unusually long time completing tasks that involve reading or writing Avoiding activities that involve reading Teens and adults Dyslexia signs in teens and adults are similar to those in children. Some common dyslexia signs and symptoms in teens and adults include Difficulty reading, including reading aloud Slow and labor-intensive reading and writing Problems spelling Avoiding activities that involve reading Mispronouncing names or words, or problems retrieving words Trouble understanding jokes or expressions that have a meaning not easily understood from the specific words (idioms), such as
Last edited by Radhajaiswal; 1 year ago
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AREEE1
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(Original post by giella)
I know this is a month late but I would be cautious about doing this degree with dyslexia. As the PP says, phonological transcription is a big part of the role. A dyslexic girl on my course nearly failed this and has struggled with the degree in general due to her dyslexia. She says she plans on just avoiding transcription when she finishes but this would be very difficult practically. Even in adults with aphasia you need some transcription skills and most settings will involve at least some transcription.
I would be carful about labelling all dyslexics the same. There is a spectrum. It’s important for trainee S&L Therapists such as yourself not to make any assumptions, an important general skill.
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giella
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(Original post by AREEE1)
I would be carful about labelling all dyslexics the same. There is a spectrum. It’s important for trainee S&L Therapists such as yourself not to make any assumptions, an important general skill.
I didn’t. I encouraged caution. I myself have a learning difficulty and I struggle with certain aspects of it in a way that academics don’t quite compensate for. This degree has a way of flushing out weaknesses you didn’t even know you had and it is problematic in that you cannot edit your life around them.
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