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    I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty decent job (I work with
    computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some point not having
    A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do my a-levels before
    my brain is completely out of "study mode".

    Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS first then a A? Anyone know
    if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not, where can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to
    working on my own. I'm studying for computing qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home
    study too..

    dave

    [q1]> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS[/q1]
    first
    [q1]> then a A? Anyone know if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not,[/q1]
    where
    [q1]> can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for computing[/q1]
    [q1]> qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> dave[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    You can do AS/A2 levels at home if you can get an exam center to take you. The problem is with
    course work which has to be authenticated. Phone the relevant exam board and talk to them about it -
    they are very helpful. An easier way is to ask if a local school etc will take you for the exam and
    the course work. My son did this for Chemistry (didn't go to lessons but did go to practicals) but
    did electronics 100% on his own including course work. mikej

    You can totally do this, but I wouldn't go through the OU for A-Levels. Simply go to the this page:

    http://www-icdl.open.ac.uk/courses_l...&qual_type=A/A
    2/AS%20Level

    And you will find a list of all the A-Levels you can study by distance learning in the UK. Listed
    Alphabetically by subject, and then within that by institution.

    Some require some face-to-face time, some don't. You can't take all subjects by distance learning
    but you'll see that most are there.

    I'm in a similar situation to yourself. I have been promoted throughout my 12 professional years and
    have only been judged by my experience. I've now got to a stage where I want to be working for
    global corporations at a high level, and I'm finding that I'm being overlooked due to my lack in
    academic qualifications. They don't just want a BA/BSc, they're looking for an
    MA/MSc. It's back to school for me!

    Good luck.

    Matt

    [q1]> From: "David Lee" <[email protected]> Organization: Gray Dawes Reply-To: "David Lee"[/q1]
    [q1]> <[email protected]> Newsgroups:[/q1]
    [q1]> uk.education,uk.education.home-education,uk.education.misc,uk.e ducation.openun iversity Date: Thu,[/q1]
    [q1]> 16 May 2002 11:27:24 +0100 Subject: A-Levels?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty decent job (I work with[/q1]
    [q1]> computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some point not having[/q1]
    [q1]> A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do my a-levels[/q1]
    [q1]> before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS first then a A? Anyone know[/q1]
    [q1]> if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not, where can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to[/q1]
    [q1]> working on my own. I'm studying for computing qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home[/q1]
    [q1]> study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> dave[/q1]

    On Thu, 16 May 2002 11:27:24 +0100, "David Lee" <[email protected]> wrote:

    [q1]>I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty decent job (I work with[/q1]
    [q1]>computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some point not having[/q1]
    [q1]>A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do my a-levels[/q1]
    [q1]>before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS first then a A? Anyone know[/q1]
    [q1]>if the OU does a-levels by home study?[/q1]

    No but they do a diploma computing award for 120 points of work. That could possibly be done in a
    single year but IMO would be better spread over 2.

    [q1]> If not, where can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for[/q1]
    [q1]> computing qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>dave[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]

    --
    Alan G

    The rule of law 'excludes the idea of any exemption of officials or others from the duty of
    obedience to the law which governs other citizens or from the jurisdiction of the ordinary
    tribunals' (Dicey)

    you could always do the same as me, i got fed up with the changes and just skipped the as/a level
    stage and started with the ou. i've found their level one courses seem to be about a level standard.
    hope that helps

    David Lee <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty[/q1]
    decent
    [q1]> job (I work with computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some[/q1]
    [q1]> point not having A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do[/q1]
    [q1]> my a-levels before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS[/q1]
    first
    [q1]> then a A? Anyone know if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not,[/q1]
    where
    [q1]> can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for computing[/q1]
    [q1]> qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> dave[/q1]

    In article <[email protected]>, posted to
    uk.education.home-education and stamped "13:36:02, Thu, 16 May 2002", mike james
    <[email protected] k> writes
    [q2]>> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS[/q2]
    [q1]>first[/q1]
    [q2]>> then a A? Anyone know if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not,[/q2]
    [q1]>where[/q1]
    [q2]>> can I do a-levels at home?[/q2]

    Wherever your home is :-) You don't need to be registered on a course of any kind.

    [q1]>I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm[/q1]
    [q2]>> studying for computing qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> dave[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q1]>You can do AS/A2 levels at home if you can get an exam center to take you.[/q1]

    There is also the option of taking the exam at the 'London Open Centres' where people studying at
    home can sit the exams without having to sit at a 'local centre' (i.e. school or college). Both AQA
    and Edexcel run such a centre. I don't know about OCR and WJEC. These centres are exam centres only,
    they only exist at exam time and don't handle anything to do with tuition or coursework.

    [q1]>The problem is with course work which has to be authenticated.[/q1]

    Yes, this is the main problem but it is surmountable! :-) You would need to have a close look at the
    coursework requirements for your chosen subjects at the various boards, and then make sure the full
    requirements for authentication are met. Note that authentication is different from supervision.

    [q1]>Phone the relevant exam board and talk to them about it - they are very helpful.[/q1]

    I would second this. Check out the websites and when ringing, ask for the Private Candidates
    department. The subject officers are also efficient. This may sound surprising in Britain today, but
    it's true. I think the reason is that boards have thousands of schools as their customers, and they
    need to pay people who have a bit of sense and skill to deal with enquiries, because otherwise their
    telephone lines will be completely jammed :-)

    Also I'd advise an early start researching what you need! :-)

    HTH

    Carrie
    --
    Carrie Carrison

    The problem with the OU is that you would be looking at a 2003 start at this point. So if you then
    take two years, you will be looking at completion in 2005.

    I am currently looking at attending an Access course but want to supplement it with A-Level study. I
    have just been informed that the success rate via DIstance Learning/Flexistudy is lower than with
    those that take A-Levels via night classes.

    Just my $0.02 worth.

    [q1]> From: alanG <[email protected]> Organization: ntlworld News Service Newsgroups:[/q1]
    [q1]> uk.education,uk.education.home-education,uk.education.misc,uk.e ducation.openun iversity Date: Thu,[/q1]
    [q1]> 16 May 2002 18:08:17 +0100 Subject: Re: A-Levels?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> On Thu, 16 May 2002 11:27:24 +0100, "David Lee" <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]>> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty decent job (I work with[/q2]
    [q2]>> computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some point not having[/q2]
    [q2]>> A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do my a-levels[/q2]
    [q2]>> before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS first then a A? Anyone[/q2]
    [q2]>> know if the OU does a-levels by home study?[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> No but they do a diploma computing award for 120 points of work. That could possibly be done in a[/q1]
    [q1]> single year but IMO would be better spread over 2.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]>> If not, where can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for[/q2]
    [q2]>> computing qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> dave[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> --[/q1]
    [q1]> Alan G[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> The rule of law 'excludes the idea of any exemption of officials or others from the duty of[/q1]
    [q1]> obedience to the law which governs other citizens or from the jurisdiction of the ordinary[/q1]
    [q1]> tribunals' (Dicey)[/q1]

    If you are serious about carrying on to do a degree afterwards then I would say it would definitely
    best to start with the Open University level 1 courses, especially as you already have experience of
    home study. The Open University will not give you any credit for A level study. Two years studying
    level 1 courses or a diploma(1 level one and 1 level 2 course) is two years off the final time to
    complete a degree however. Once you have a degree combined with your work experience, I don't think
    employers will be interested in whether or not you have A levels.

    Linda

    ----- Original Message ----- From: abbie <[email protected]> Newsgroups:
    uk.education.openuniversity Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2002 6:24 PM Subject: Re: A-Levels?

    [q1]> you could always do the same as me, i got fed up with the changes and just skipped the as/a level[/q1]
    [q1]> stage and started with the ou. i've found their[/q1]
    level
    [q1]> one courses seem to be about a level standard. hope that helps[/q1]

    I am cancelling and resending a previous message as a made a mistake about the requirements for
    a diploma.

    If you wish to stop at A levels then the other messages in this thread all give good advice.

    If you are serious about carrying on to do a degree afterwards then I would say it would definitely
    be best to start with the Open University level 1 courses, especially as you already have experience
    of home study. The Open University will not give you any credit for A level study. Two years
    studying level 1 courses or a diploma(1 level 2 and 1 level 3 course) is two years off the final
    time to complete a degree however. It is advisable to start with level 1 courses but if you have
    experience of home study plus some knowledge of the subject material you can start at a higher
    level. The Open University can send a comprehensive syllabus. I have found the course advisors
    extremely helpful. Once you have a degree combined with your work experience, I don't think
    employers will be interested in whether or not you have A levels.

    Linda

    ----- Original Message ----- From: abbie <[email protected]> Newsgroups:
    uk.education.openuniversity Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2002 6:24 PM Subject: Re: A-Levels?

    abbie <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> you could always do the same as me, i got fed up with the changes and just skipped the as/a level[/q1]
    [q1]> stage and started with the ou. i've found their[/q1]
    level
    [q1]> one courses seem to be about a level standard. hope that helps[/q1]

    "David Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty[/q1]
    decent
    [q1]> job (I work with computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some[/q1]
    [q1]> point not having A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do[/q1]
    [q1]> my a-levels before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS[/q1]
    first
    [q1]> then a A? Anyone know if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not,[/q1]
    where
    [q1]> can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for computing[/q1]
    [q1]> qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> dave[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]

    Why not just do an OU degree? nan

    If you're over 21, why not do a degree?

    Under 21 you won't be classed as a mature student and therefore you will have to take the
    traditional route. But over the age of 21 you can start a degree at most institutions and avoid the
    A-level route. It will save yourself a number of years, lots of money and willnot be a drawback.

    You will be accepted - I'm the admissions tutor for a degree at a West Yorkshire university. I
    accept mature students without A-levels - provided the commitment is evident.

    Regards

    David

    Watch the spam trap - peel my 'SPUD' to reply.

    "David Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty[/q1]
    decent
    [q1]> job (I work with computers so experience counts at this stage more than quals). I know at some[/q1]
    [q1]> point not having A-Levels/Degree might adversly effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do[/q1]
    [q1]> my a-levels before my brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Now that they are split into AS and A levels, would I have to do an AS[/q1]
    first
    [q1]> then a A? Anyone know if the OU does a-levels by home study? If not,[/q1]
    where
    [q1]> can I do a-levels at home? I'm quite used to working on my own. I'm studying for computing[/q1]
    [q1]> qualifications, and I did a couple GCSEs by home study too..[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> dave[/q1]

    My wife has done her MBA from India in Human resource , we were wondering what would be the value of
    her degree in UK and if she wants to study further in this field , which course should she take. She
    is more intrested in doing a job though ..

    AM

    "David Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> I dropped out of college during my a-levels and now work in a pretty[/q1]
    decent
    [q1]> job (I work with computers so experience counts at this stage more[/q1]
    than
    [q1]> quals). I know at some point not having A-Levels/Degree might[/q1]
    adversly
    [q1]> effect my chances of a better job, so I want to do my a-levels[/q1]
    before my
    [q1]> brain is completely out of "study mode".[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]

    I crashed all my A-levels and went to live abroad for some years. When I came back here I just
    started an OU degree (computing & Maths subjects). Now working as a software engineeer.

    --
    Skræðer
 
 
 
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