foxstudy
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In reference to biological classification
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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I have never thought of them that way, but because every organism lies in a particular taxonomy division, and does not ever "sit on the fence", simply out of the way the criteria that determine the class, family, genus, species, etc are set (by us humans!), it follows that these divisions are separate from one another and hence discrete.

I hope I am not making things worse for you! :mad:

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ThatGuy107
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As the above post states, an organism cannot exist in 2 taxa at the same time. This means that, for example, if you were looking at the Panthera genus (big cats) and the Canis genus (dogs) an organism cannot exist in both of these genus’ at the same time, it can only exist in 1. Hope this helps
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