How do I pick my firm choice university? Watch

FutureDoc01
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https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...ice-university
Making a decision on your preferred university destination can be quite difficult which is why I've decided to write this article to help you come to a decision. Lemme know what you think and feel free to ask any questions
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FutureDoc01
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Also share with friends who are in the same boat as you and struggling to make a decision
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Muttley79
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
Also share with friends who are in the same boat as you and struggling to make a decision
Some interesting thoughts. I think you could talk about looking at assessment process - how much coursework etc.

Also the option of a year in industry would be valuable for many STEM degrees..

Universities don't just give offers to those they think will get the grades btw .... they have to fill places!
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...ice-university
Making a decision on your preferred university destination can be quite difficult which is why I've decided to write this article to help you come to a decision. Lemme know what you think and feel free to ask any questions
Looks like a very informative article. Hopefully the CT can add this to the Today on TSR widget on the top right corner of the page and promote it.
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Some interesting thoughts. I think you could talk about looking at assessment process - how much coursework etc.

Also the option of a year in industry would be valuable for many STEM degrees..

Universities don't just give offers to those they think will get the grades btw .... they have to fill places!
Yh the assessment process is a good point im not gonna lie i completely overlooked that and yes I have quite a few friends who have been drawn to a particular university due an option for a year abroad
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by CoffeeAndPolitics)
Looks like a very informative article. Hopefully the CT can add this to the Today on TSR widget on the top right corner of the page and promote it.
Hopefully, Do you have a say since your a community assistant? If so I'd appreciate your recommendation
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
Hopefully, Do you have a say since your a community assistant? If so I'd appreciate your recommendation
I could recommend but I don't get a say sadly.
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Some interesting thoughts. I think you could talk about looking at assessment process - how much coursework etc.

Also the option of a year in industry would be valuable for many STEM degrees..

Universities don't just give offers to those they think will get the grades btw .... they have to fill places!
Of course there's an element of universities having to fill out spaces. But someone applying to a course with requirements of three A's with predictions of three B's wont get an offer will they?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
Of course there's an element of universities having to fill out spaces. But someone applying to a course with requirements of three A's with predictions of three B's wont get an offer will they?
Yes they might if they know the school is accurate with predictions. Many schools over-predict ...
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by CoffeeAndPolitics)
I could recommend but I don't get a say sadly.
Ok. Thanks anyway
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Yes they might if they know the school is accurate with predictions. Many schools over-predict ...
Thats fair but the Uni's would have a really tough time knowing if the school is fair so would most likely factor in GCSEs more greatly.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
Thats fair but the Uni's would have a really tough time knowing if the school is fair so would most likely factor in GCSEs more greatly.
You'd be surprised - I know a number of academics and they do recognise many schools. We certainly track our own predictions as I am held to account if students don't meet them!
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Muttley79)
You'd be surprised - I know a number of academics and they do recognise many schools. We certainly track our own predictions as I am held to account if students don't meet them!
Oh your a teacher! So you'd know. My bad
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Muttley79
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
Oh your a teacher! So you'd know. My bad
It's fine You have made a good start with your article ...
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Nnerojan7)
Don’t you think that schools should be forced to do as’ that don’t go towards a final a level grade but helps with predicted grades?
In theory that would be good. As the students can be assessed on their AS content and the school make a judgement on what they think their students will get at A - level. However different schools will have different standards of testing. One school could have a very easy internal AS and another a hard one which would reflect in their predicted grades with Unis being none the wiser
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FutureDoc01
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(Original post by Nnerojan7)
And don’t you think the changes in the course structure of a levels has made life more difficult for all those involved, with students suffering from the unreliability of predicted grades rather than the ‘increased’ difficulty of exams?
It has made applying much easier for some students as many students who would have been found out in the old system due to the full transparency of AS were able to bump their predictions. However, the new linear a - level I think has made it much harder to actually achieve the grades for many students as they are just so hard
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Doones
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(Original post by FutureDoc01)
It has made applying much easier for some students as many students who would have been found out in the old system due to the full transparency of AS were able to bump their predictions. However, the new linear a - level I think has made it much harder to actually achieve the grades for many students as they are just so hard
Universities know that most predictions are wrong and often too high.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-38223432

This is one reason why many universities, for many courses, may allow a 1 or 2 grade miss on results day.
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FutureDoc01
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Thats a good point but Uni's also do know that teachers are held to standard for their predictions. Also it would depend on the competitiveness of the course if Uni's were to allow missed grades.
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notdyls
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(Original post by Nnerojan7)
And don’t you think the changes in the course structure of a levels has made life more difficult for all those involved, with students suffering from the unreliability of predicted grades rather than the ‘increased’ difficulty of exams?
No? The new linear system can work in the favour of a lot of students, especially those who may have initially struggled with the change to A Level, so giving them the full two years to prepare for their exams can be better for them instead of having exams in the first year if they spent half the year getting used to the harder content. It's not like the unis have nothing to judge a student off of, GCSEs are always still there.
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FutureDoc01
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But the sheer volume of knowledge that students have to know compared to the old spec is huge leading to lower grade boundaries which reflect just how hard they are. An example would be AQA a level biology which last year students needed just 53% for an A
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