How can I correct this sentence?

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Ash2810
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#1
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#1
Hi,

I am currently writing an essay on Pride and Prejudice, but I'm having a bit of an issue with this sentence:

"Austen has certainly made a serious point about women: they are more intelligent than given credit for."

It's the last sentence in the paragraph. My teacher says it is incorrect to end a sentence with 'for', but I'm not sure how I would reword it while keeping the gist of the sentence the same.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Last edited by Ash2810; 3 years ago
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Afterlife?
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#2
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#2
replace . With ; and then carry on with ur reason
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PhoenixFortune
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#3
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(Original post by Ash2810)
Hi,

I am currently writing an essay on Pride and Prejudice, but I'm having a bit of an issue with this sentence:

"Austen has certainly made a serious point about women: they are more intelligent than given credit for."

It's the last sentence in the paragraph. My teacher says it is incorrect to end a sentence with 'for', but I'm not sure how I would reword it while keeping the gist of the sentence the same.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Some people hate sentences ending in a preposition, some don't.

I would probably reword it as "they have more intelligence than for which they are given credit".
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Tolgash
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Your teacher is wrong. It is a common myth that it is incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition. I do not know any grammar guides that actually state that it is. I believe that even Shakespeare has ended a sentence with a preposition before. This and beginning your sentences with conjunctions somehow being the Devil's work really do mystify me. I do not think they are solecisms.
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Ash2810
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#5
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#5
Thank you so much!
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DrSocSciences
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#6
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#6
The intelligence of the female sex/gender is underestimated/undervalued/overlooked.
Last edited by DrSocSciences; 3 years ago
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anosmianAcrimony
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Your teacher is wrong. It is a common myth that it is incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition. I do not know any grammar guides that actually state that it is. I believe that even Shakespeare has ended a sentence with a preposition before. This and beginning your sentences with conjunctions somehow being the Devil's work really do mystify me. I do not think they are solecisms.
Technically it is wrong to end with a preposition, but everyone ignores that rule and people who rigorously enforce it are pedants.

Winston Churchill wrote an autobiography and had someone else edit it. The editor rearranged some sentences so they didn't end in prepositions. Churchill wrote back, ''This is the kind of editing without which I could do!''
Last edited by anosmianAcrimony; 3 years ago
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Duncan2012
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#8
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
Technically it is wrong to end a preposition
In Latin grammar, yes. I couldn't find anything definitive about the rule in English grammar.

(Original post by Ash2810)
My teacher says it is incorrect to end a sentence with 'for'
I would be tempted to ask her where that 'rule' is written. But be careful you don't come across as being cheeky!

(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I would probably reword it as "they have more intelligence than for which they are given credit".
That doesn't sound quite right.

As for OP's question - if you're not happy leaving it as is, how about:

"...they have more intelligence than commonly thought"
"...they are more intelligent than often thought"
"...they are more intelligent than many people would think"
"...their intelligence is often underestimated"
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Tolgash
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
Technically it is wrong to end a preposition, but everyone ignores that rule and people who rigorously enforce it are pedants.'
Really? It is technically wrong? Can you show me evidence for this? Not that I do not believe you, I just have not read a source that actually enforces it.
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Ash2810
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#10
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(Original post by Duncan2012)
In Latin grammar, yes. I couldn't find anything definitive about the rule in English grammar.


I would be tempted to ask her where that 'rule' is written. But be careful you don't come across as being cheeky!


That doesn't sound quite right.

As for OP's question - if you're not happy leaving it as is, how about:

"...they have more intelligence than commonly thought"
"...they are more intelligent than often thought"
"...they are more intelligent than many people would think"
"...their intelligence is often underestimated"
Thank you! I have edited the sentence to: "...they have more intelligence than commonly thought."
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the bear
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#11
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#11
"Ms Austen has certainly made a serious point about women: they are more intelligent than popularly believed"
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