will less EU students go to the uk after brexit

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p1128
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does that mean uk students can get into unis easier
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999tigger
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(Original post by p1128)
does that mean uk students can get into unis easier
Depends on whether theres an agreement or not. If no deal then possibly, but a collapse in the £ will make it more attracftive to non EU international students. Very large numbers come from China to study here.
It could also mean that less demand means the sector contracts as unis close or reduce places..
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Doones
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(Original post by p1128)
does that mean uk students can get into unis easier
Only about 10% of places go to EU students currently. If they suddenly stopped coming (which is unlikely) it's just as likely that other international students could take up those places.

Most UK students find a place, the only real exception is for courses like medicine which are capped.

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Nalk1573
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(Original post by p1128)
does that mean uk students can get into unis easier
This is a giant lie being perpetrated on British society.

Most immigration, about 70%, comes from outside the EU.
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Doones
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(Original post by ltsmith)
depends on if the fee structure changes. i know that in scotland eu students can get tuition free
That could easily change in a no-deal Brexit though. The reason why EU students get it free is because Scotland has to let them get the same deal as Scottish students due to EU rules. If we aren't in the EU then that rule would no longer apply unless it was included in a deal.
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Retired_Messiah
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As is the case with everything brexit related: it depends.
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Realitysreflexx
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EU students that want a British education will still get one.... But it becomes more likely that if international fees are applied after brexit, which they surely will be...than only the really well off/borderline rich will be able to come. To be totally honest when I tell people at home in Germany I study in England in the summer there's a look of amazement. How am I paying for it? And honestly with the increase in inflation in the UK, its getting out of hand.


First year I paid 4,033 pounds for the year for accommodation.... Now in third year (upcoming September) prices have shot up! £5,100 pounds for the year, for the same room!!! Off campus non catered. So unless the student loans have increased (which I don't get) something in the UK education sector needs a looking over. Or possibly no one who isn't British or extremely rich will ever study in the UK.

The Chinese may actually stop coming also if the British unis fall in the rankings....which could easily become an issue if they can't freely collaborate thru European research funds.

The Chinese love rankings, they don't love the UK.
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J Papi
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EU student here:

Depends on the university/course and how attractive it's seen as - particularly in relation to leading EU universities (Sciences Po, Leiden, Humbolt, etc.), which are often cheaper for undergrad.

Depends on the tuition fee rises (if any) after Brexit. EU students tend to hail from a wider variety of social/economic backgrounds than internationals, from my humble experience. Most of them either can't or are unwilling to pay massive fees. The availability of student finance is also a key factor.

Depends on the state of the UK job market. Some EU students see the UK as a gateway to a better life/job, at least in the short run.

I think that we've all agreed that the overwhelming majority of courses and universities in the UK aren't that difficult to get into. The truly elite/selective ones are the exception to the rule.
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
EU student here:

Depends on the university/course and how attractive it's seen as - particularly in relation to leading EU universities (Sciences Po, Leiden, Humbolt, etc.), which are often cheaper for undergrad.

Depends on the tuition fee rises (if any) after Brexit. EU students tend to hail from a wider variety of social/economic backgrounds than internationals, from my humble experience. Most of them either can't or are unwilling to pay massive fees. The availability of student finance is also a key factor.

Depends on the state of the UK job market. Some EU students see the UK as a gateway to a better life/job, at least in the short run.

I think that we've all agreed that the overwhelming majority of courses and universities in the UK aren't that difficult to get into. The truly elite/selective ones are the exception to the rule.

Hmm I've had a ponder about this, and decided a while ago to get a continent qualification for an MSc in case there is a significant shunning of UK qualifications in Europe. Could you imagine this occurring in the post brexit environment, employers kind of scoffing at UK grads?
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J Papi
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Hmm I've had a ponder about this, and decided a while ago to get a continent qualification for an MSc in case there is a significant shunning of UK qualifications in Europe. Could you imagine this occurring in the post brexit environment, employers kind of scoffing at UK grads?
No, I can't. In some countries, a UK degree (irrespective of where it's from) is respected as a 'good thing' in itself. You'd have to go through a very radical change in thinking (which would serve no purpose other than being petty and vindictive) to get that attitude to change. There's also no reason as to why UK unis would become less respected overnight because of Brexit. If there is a decline, it will be a slow, long-term decline, as research funding dries up and prominent academics move (back) to Europe or the US.

Besides, most employers will be too busy assessing what you can do (whether it's in term of hard CV-able skills or passing various assessments on the day) and who you know/who's referring you. The significance of where you studied ultimately matters little.
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Doones
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Could you imagine this occurring in the post brexit environment, employers kind of scoffing at UK grads?
No.
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
No.
Care to elaborate? Or just a gut feeling.
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Doones
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Care to elaborate? Or just a gut feeling.
Leaving the EU should make no difference to the academic standing of UK degrees. The Bologna Process isn't for EU-only countries. That said some countries are unhappy that UK masters are only a year... but that doesn't affect undergrad BA/BSc degrees.
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Leaving the EU should make no difference to the academic standing of UK degrees. The Bologna Process isn't for EU-only countries. That said some countries are unhappy that UK masters are only a year... but that doesn't affect undergrad BA/BSc degrees.
Well since I'm intending to do my MsC in the Netherlands (also one year). Let's hope those countries aren't ones I plan on working in. Do you think I'll be disadvantaged back in the UK if I went to one of the top Dutch unis? (Erasmus, or University of Amsterdam). Its really coming down to cost for me... I'll save a crap ton by avoiding the UK masters fees. Which for similarly ranked places are outrageous....

Warwick would want £25,000 for a year
While University of Amsterdam requests €2,036

Warwick QS = 54th
U Of A = 57th...

And I could see the UK job market potentially seeing some downsides in the future simply because of all the uncertainty. As a business student I'll likely be trying to work for MNE's which operate in both markets (EU and UK).
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Doones
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Well since I'm intending to do my MsC in the Netherlands (also one year). Let's hope those countries aren't ones I plan on working in. Do you think I'll be disadvantaged back in the UK if I went to one of the top Dutch unis? (Erasmus, or University of Amsterdam). Its really coming down to cost for me... I'll save a crap ton by avoiding the UK masters fees. Which for similarly ranked places are outrageous....

Warwick would want £25,000 for a year
While University of Amsterdam requests €2,036

Warwick QS = 54th
U Of A = 57th...

And I could see the UK job market potentially seeing some downsides in the future simply because of all the uncertainty. As a business student I'll likely be trying to work for MNE's which operate in both markets (EU and UK).
A Dutch postgrad qualification will not be a problem for a UK (or MNE) employer. But why do an MSc anyway? Which course?
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
A Dutch postgrad qualification will not be a problem for a UK (or MNE) employer. But why do an MSc anyway? Which course?
I just feel like my management degree isn't very impressive, obviously I have a decently branded university name on it, (imo) I'm sure you can remember which one. But I would like to specialise in either organisational change and consulting at Erasmus or do a strategic management MsC with change electives at University of Amsterdam. Or if I'm unable to get into those two I'll consider university of groningen msc in change management.

Ultimately I would like to work in change management or consulting (specifically in that field) (OCM).

Obviously consulting is difficult to get into and a MsC can be beneficial from what I've gathered.

I will also try and get change qualifications such as ProSci CM after my MsC.

The salary is quite good, but its simply not taught in any capacity that is respectable at undergrad.. Its simply still an emerging field, however a relevant one.
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Doones
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
I just feel like my management degree isn't very impressive, obviously I have a decently branded university name on it, (imo) I'm sure you can remember which one. But I would like to specialise in either organisational change and consulting at Erasmus or do a strategic management MsC with change electives at University of Amsterdam. Or if I'm unable to get into those two I'll consider university of groningen msc in change management.

Ultimately I would like to work in change management or consulting (specifically in that field) (OCM).

Obviously consulting is difficult to get into and a MsC can be beneficial from what I've gathered.

I will also try and get change qualifications such as ProSci CM after my MsC.

The salary is quite good, but its simply not taught in any capacity that is respectable at undergrad.. Its simply still an emerging field, however a relevant one.
Consulting isn't *that* difficult if you are a good candidate. Haven't you been applying for summer placements, etc?

And then an MBA would be better from a top (and I mean top) business school, if MBB is your goal..

Anyway, this is off topic so have a look at the MBB thread in the consulting forum.
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p1128
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would they increase the fees in 2019?
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999tigger
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(Original post by p1128)
would they increase the fees in 2019?
You mean fpr EU students? Nope they will stay the same and they have already been published.
For 2020, then it all depends on whether they have a deal or not because if they dont then EU students will be just like any international students and be charged international fees plus be denied access to UK student loans. That would make it impossible for all but the independently wealthy to attend UK uni. It may be ok for EU students who are .long term UK residents.

Disappointing for EU students who wanted to study in the UK for 2020 and beyond though.
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candokoala
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Compilers of the QS world uni rankings have said Brexit could adversely affect the UK's performance in the league tables.

I've written a news article about this on TSR and I've quoted you Realitysreflexx, JohanGRK and also Doonesbury from the thread about Norway telling students to avoid UK unis.

Enjoy!
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