username4486766
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Hello there Everyone,

Hope to find you all in good health and condition. Well I an now in Pearson Edexcel IAL; and I have choose to be an Engineer when I join the University, I have planning to go to Overseas like Canada, Australia etc...

Now my point is that; this is the 21st century and the modern era of Science and Technology, so I would like to ask you all and deeply to the experts that; which Engineering is worth to be; in sense of not only great money income but to help the humanity and the world as its going under certain consequences like Global Warming etc...

And for that, A levels is a level where the Subjects needs to be chosen according to the career set up of oneself, so for what types of Engineering what Subjects are need for the best job opportunity and getting into a good university and fine with the entry requirements.

I would reapply appreciate all your support by helping me with this matter.

Best and kindest Regards,
Kamrul
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arigziegler
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My brother does Environmental Engineering with a minor in Economics at UBC in Canada and loves it. Might be worth looking into if you want to help the planter & make a decent living?
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username4486766
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Thanks for your reply. Well I do like to contribute anyhow for the Global Warming; but basically I am more into Technology.

And I would like to ask you that what are the entry requirements in Canada for Environmental Engineering?
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arigziegler
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Thanks for your reply. Well I do like to contribute anyhow for the Global Warming; but basically I am more into Technology.

And I would like to ask you that what are the entry requirements in Canada for Environmental Engineering?
We did IB but the subject requirements are the same for A-levels, they want maths, chem and physics. They assess holistically so there is not set grade target.
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username4486766
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(Original post by arigziegler)
We did IB but the subject requirements are the same for A-levels, they want maths, chem and physics. They assess holistically so there is not set grade target.
Oh! I see. Is Further Maths required for any Universities in Canada? Or FP would help you in the Engineering fields?
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arigziegler
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Oh! I see. Is Further Maths required for any Universities in Canada? Or FP would help you in the Engineering fields?
They usually don't ask for it but by all means check out other unis, my brother got into McGill and UBC without further maths. Also the better grades you get in A-levels, the more extra credits Canadian unis give you, so sometimes you can skip the first semester because IB/A-levels are harder than the Canadian and US programs.
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username4486766
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You mean IB and Edexcel A levels are tough right than Canadian and US programs right? and one more thing as for International Students is there any English requirements?
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artful_lounger
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Slightly confusingly worded, but in any case;

Are you looking to study engineering in the UK, or elsewhere? This site mainly caters to UK students/universities, although there are some who have knowledge of international admissions/study as well.

Within the UK, A-level Maths (or equivalent, e.g. IB HL) is a virtually ubiquitous requirement for any engineering course in the UK. The vast majority also expect A-level Physics. Some however accept A-level Chemistry in lieu of A-level Physics (mainly chemical/materials engineering, sometimes biological engineering related courses as well). A few accept any science along with A-level Maths, but these are in the minority. A handful require A-level Maths and Physics with a third science subject, which is normally Chemistry but a handful of biomedical engineering courses expect A-level Biology. A-level Further Maths, while rarely, if ever, formally required is usually highly recommended and considered very useful.

As such the requirements vary, but generally taking A-level Maths and Physics will meet the criteria you for most courses, and taking A-level Chemistry and/or Further Maths is useful or sometimes required background. However many apply with just A-level Maths and Physics on the STEM side and take e.g. A-level Economics, History, Art, or any other number of subjects as a third. This may be less competitive for the "top" universities here however.

A-level Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Chemistry is not an uncommon combination of four, and unlike most combinations of four A-levels is a relevant and useful combination and due to cumulative/overlapping content in maths/FM/physics, is not an impossible amount of work (although obviously more than just taking three). However Physics/Maths/FM or Physics/Maths/Chemistry are perfectly suitably if you are only able or willing to take three A-levels.

International requirements are likely to vary, and you should check individual universities' requirements before applying (if it's unclear, contact them directly, and they should be happy to advise). However in general, engineering in any discipline is primarily maths and physics, so taking as much maths especially, and to a lesser extent physics or perhaps other sciences, would be useful preparation even if not formally required.

Environmental engineering is generally a sub-discipline of civil engineering, but energy aspects relating to global climate change may be approached from a variety of different engineering disciplines (such as electrical/electronic, chemical, materials, mechanical, civil...virtually any discipline except biomedical engineering would be directly relevant in some way, and even that might be relevant in a less direct way in terms of basic engineering sciences).
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username4486766
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Slightly confusingly worded, but in any case;

Are you looking to study engineering in the UK, or elsewhere? This site mainly caters to UK students/universities, although there are some who have knowledge of international admissions/study as well.

Within the UK, A-level Maths (or equivalent, e.g. IB HL) is a virtually ubiquitous requirement for any engineering course in the UK. The vast majority also expect A-level Physics. Some however accept A-level Chemistry in lieu of A-level Physics (mainly chemical/materials engineering, sometimes biological engineering related courses as well). A few accept any science along with A-level Maths, but these are in the minority. A handful require A-level Maths and Physics with a third science subject, which is normally Chemistry but a handful of biomedical engineering courses expect A-level Biology. A-level Further Maths, while rarely, if ever, formally required is usually highly recommended and considered very useful.

As such the requirements vary, but generally taking A-level Maths and Physics will meet the criteria you for most courses, and taking A-level Chemistry and/or Further Maths is useful or sometimes required background. However many apply with just A-level Maths and Physics on the STEM side and take e.g. A-level Economics, History, Art, or any other number of subjects as a third. This may be less competitive for the "top" universities here however.

A-level Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Chemistry is not an uncommon combination of four, and unlike most combinations of four A-levels is a relevant and useful combination and due to cumulative/overlapping content in maths/FM/physics, is not an impossible amount of work (although obviously more than just taking three). However Physics/Maths/FM or Physics/Maths/Chemistry are perfectly suitably if you are only able or willing to take three A-levels.

International requirements are likely to vary, and you should check individual universities' requirements before applying (if it's unclear, contact them directly, and they should be happy to advise). However in general, engineering in any discipline is primarily maths and physics, so taking as much maths especially, and to a lesser extent physics or perhaps other sciences, would be useful preparation even if not formally required.

Environmental engineering is generally a sub-discipline of civil engineering, but energy aspects relating to global climate change may be approached from a variety of different engineering disciplines (such as electrical/electronic, chemical, materials, mechanical, civil...virtually any discipline except biomedical engineering would be directly relevant in some way, and even that might be relevant in a less direct way in terms of basic engineering sciences).
Wow! Just Wow! You answered 97% of all my questions; thanks a whole lot, you made me very clear in concepts of A levels Subjects leading to a carrier. I really appreciate your kindness and support.
Now I would like to ask you some of my rest questions, that is;
I hope to join Universities of Canada mainly but not 100% sure that I will go to Canada for higher studies might go to other countries.
Now currently IAS of Maths, Physics, Chemistry. So Futher Maths is not compulsory requirement but I heard that it is very useful and will give you a great boost in understanding of things when you are at Universities or other life career jobs.

So now for Maths I want you to help me understand the Units concept; like: P1, P2, P3 and P4 is compulsory. So in addition I have taken M1 and M2.
Now that if I take, Further Maths then how the units will be added with the rest of them?

Next question is, now its the modern era so which Engineering career is in demand in the upcoming years? And you said that is very right that for Global Climate change that can be supported from any Engineering fields. As for instance Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical/Electronic or any other Engineering; from which one is to be chosen from its high demand in the future and the best branch of Engineering of its highly respect and others.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Wow! Just Wow! You answered 97% of all my questions; thanks a whole lot, you made me very clear in concepts of A levels Subjects leading to a carrier. I really appreciate your kindness and support.
Now I would like to ask you some of my rest questions, that is;
I hope to join Universities of Canada mainly but not 100% sure that I will go to Canada for higher studies might go to other countries.
Now currently IAS of Maths, Physics, Chemistry. So Futher Maths is not compulsory requirement but I heard that it is very useful and will give you a great boost in understanding of things when you are at Universities or other life carrier jobs.

So now for Maths I want you to help me understand the Units concept; like: P1, P2, P3 and P4 is compulsory. So in addition I have taken M1 and M2.
Now that if I take, Further Maths then how the units will be added with the rest of them?

Next question is, now its the modern era so which Engineering carrier is in demand in the upcoming years? And you said that is very right that for Global Climate change that can be supported from any Engineering fields. As for instance Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical/Electronic or any other Engineering; from which one is to be chosen from its high demand in the future and the best branch of Engineering of its highly respect and others.
The international A-levels are different to UK A-levels, as they're still modular. I assume FM is similar to the old FM spec, in which case there should be 1-4 Further Pure modules (FP1-4, some boards had fewer I think) and statistics/decision modules and sometimes more mechanics modules. I believe most specs for FM had you take two FP modules, and then the rest you could choose as you like. The FP and M modules are most relevant to engineering, but the decision modules and some of the stats modules were considered pretty easy, and universities in the UK (and almost certainly anywhere else) don't really care what particular modules you take. There is a slightly confusing method they used to use to maximise your overall grades between maths and FM, by swapping modules around to get you the highest grade in each; there isn't really anything to consider here as I believe it happens automatically, but just be aware of that.

Any engineering discipline is relevant for the future. While oil and gas, and more generally petrochemical engineering is perhaps on a decline, which leads many to assume chemical engineering is a bad option, there is a lot more to chemical engineering than just those areas, and it's very relevant for e.g. formulation engineering in food, gels and pastes, biochemical engineering, nuclear engineering etc. Also it, as with civil/mechanical/aerospace engineering, covers a core set of topics that is pretty widely applicable (namely fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, and various aspects of those areas) and there are plenty of roles which need a background in that area which don't require a particular engineering discipline background.

Electronic/electrical engineering is pretty isolated compared to other disciplines, and has the least overlap in general, although given the widespread use of electronics and the need for efficient electrical supply and power storage as a result, it's certainly not an area that's languishing. Materials is pretty niche, and depending on the course can skew very much into the "science" side more than engineering side. It's very relevant for research, and while present in industry and an important aspect of a lot of engineering problems, it's maybe less "common-place" than others. Of course having a niche isn't a bad thing...
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username4486766
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The international A-levels are different to UK A-levels, as they're still modular. I assume FM is similar to the old FM spec, in which case there should be 1-4 Further Pure modules (FP1-4, some boards had fewer I think) and statistics/decision modules and sometimes more mechanics modules. I believe most specs for FM had you take two FP modules, and then the rest you could choose as you like. The FP and M modules are most relevant to engineering, but the decision modules and some of the stats modules were considered pretty easy, and universities in the UK (and almost certainly anywhere else) don't really care what particular modules you take. There is a slightly confusing method they used to use to maximise your overall grades between maths and FM, by swapping modules around to get you the highest grade in each; there isn't really anything to consider here as I believe it happens automatically, but just be aware of that.

Any engineering discipline is relevant for the future. While oil and gas, and more generally petrochemical engineering is perhaps on a decline, which leads many to assume chemical engineering is a bad option, there is a lot more to chemical engineering than just those areas, and it's very relevant for e.g. formulation engineering in food, gels and pastes, biochemical engineering, nuclear engineering etc. Also it, as with civil/mechanical/aerospace engineering, covers a core set of topics that is pretty widely applicable (namely fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, and various aspects of those areas) and there are plenty of roles which need a background in that area which don't require a particular engineering discipline background.

Electronic/electrical engineering is pretty isolated compared to other disciplines, and has the least overlap in general, although given the widespread use of electronics and the need for efficient electrical supply and power storage as a result, it's certainly not an area that's languishing. Materials is pretty niche, and depending on the course can skew very much into the "science" side more than engineering side. It's very relevant for research, and while present in industry and an important aspect of a lot of engineering problems, it's maybe less "common-place" than others. Of course having a niche isn't a bad thing...
Thanks again for your help, yes International A levels are different as now for the new specs; FM has 3 Units, Mechanics 3 units, Statistics 3 units and Decision Maths 1 unit.
Now for the good Engineering carrier; you have explained about chemical and Electirc Engineering, I think among them Mechanical Engineering lies great what you say? And in the conclusion which side lies great advantage than other?
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Doones
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Wow! Just Wow! You answered 97% of all my questions; thanks a whole lot, you made me very clear in concepts of A levels Subjects leading to a carrier. I really appreciate your kindness and support.
Now I would like to ask you some of my rest questions, that is;
I hope to join Universities of Canada mainly but not 100% sure that I will go to Canada for higher studies might go to other countries.
Now currently IAS of Maths, Physics, Chemistry. So Futher Maths is not compulsory requirement but I heard that it is very useful and will give you a great boost in understanding of things when you are at Universities or other life carrier jobs.

So now for Maths I want you to help me understand the Units concept; like: P1, P2, P3 and P4 is compulsory. So in addition I have taken M1 and M2.
Now that if I take, Further Maths then how the units will be added with the rest of them?

Next question is, now its the modern era so which Engineering carrier is in demand in the upcoming years? And you said that is very right that for Global Climate change that can be supported from any Engineering fields. As for instance Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical/Electronic or any other Engineering; from which one is to be chosen from its high demand in the future and the best branch of Engineering of its highly respect and others.
What do you mean by "carrier"? Do you mean specialisation?

I suspect the word you actually intended to use is career not carrier...

The specialisation to pick is the one that most interests you. By the way, at undergraduate level it's best to pick more general areas such as mechanical or civil or chemical, rather than "environmental". The environmental aspect comes at masters level.

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username4486766
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
What do you mean by "carrier"? Do you mean specialisation?

I suspect the word you actually intended to use is career not carrier...

The specialisation to pick is the one that most interests you. By the way, at undergraduate level it's best to pick more general areas such as mechanical or civil or chemical, rather than "environmental". The environmental aspect comes at masters level.

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Yeah I mean Career, sorry typo mistake. About the undergraduate program I didn't know until now which side to maintain as Engineering carrier.
Well speaking of Mechanical, Electrical or Chemical or even civil which aspect do you worth a go. In my common sense I think Mechanical is better than Electrical as for Mechanical you will be creating techs of electrical and so on others.
What do you say?
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Doones
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Yeah I mean Carrier, sorry typo mistake. About the undergraduate program I didn't know until now which side to maintain as Engineering carrier.
Well speaking of Mechanical, Electrical or Chemical or even civil which aspect do you worth a go. In my common sense I think Mechanical is better than Electrical as for Mechanical you will be creating techs of electrical and so on others.
What do you say?
Career
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Career
Sorry again! My bad.
I am still looking for support, replies as well from others.
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(Original post by Kamrul11)
Sorry again! My bad.
I am still looking for support, replies as well from others.
My earlier point still stands, pick the specialisation that most interests you. Go along to some open days to get a feel for the differences if you are unsure.

You could also look at general engineering courses that let you specialise after year 1 or year 2.
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