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username4368778
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There's alot of quotes to remember with English Literature as it is (i'm aware they are basically mandatory in english lit), and tbh I'm only going for a 6 in RE. i know i sound lazy as if i'm not trying but RE isn't that important to me (i go to a catholic school, didnt choose RE and never would ngl) and i prioritize my other subjects like maths and computer science much more and i am pushing for 9s in those so i want to put more time into those rather than RE. what i'm asking is, do you need quotes to get a decent grade in RE? if yes, do they need to be word for word or can you just reference teachings?

sorry if i sound like i'm ****ging off RE it's just that i'm continuing with maths and computing at a level so i'm more keen to have the best chance in those.
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totaro_
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Hey! I'm in the same position as you; I despise RE but I don't exactly have a choice. I scrape 8s without revising (I'm with Eduqas) and it's arguably the easiest GCSE I'm doing.

Like English, it's a matter of remembering quotes and teachings but referencing them should be fine.

They don't need to be word for word at all either, although it would be preferred. It's best to remember who that quote / teaching is by and what the teaching is rather than it's word for word basis. As long as you know what you're talking about and explain it, eg) a teaching about murder in the Bible: "it's one of the commandments and states that we shouldn't murder because (explanation).

Good luck in studying!
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username4368778
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oh ok sound ty i'm probably just gonna learn 1 parable for each module or something then explain the parable link it to the 12 marker in some way idk
(Original post by totaro_)
Hey! I'm in the same position as you; I despise RE but I don't exactly have a choice. I scrape 8s without revising (I'm with Eduqas) and it's arguably the easiest GCSE I'm doing.

Like English, it's a matter of remembering quotes and teachings but referencing them should be fine.

They don't need to be word for word at all either, although it would be preferred. It's best to remember who that quote / teaching is by and what the teaching is rather than it's word for word basis. As long as you know what you're talking about and explain it, eg) a teaching about murder in the Bible: "it's one of the commandments and states that we shouldn't murder because (explanation).

Good luck in studying!
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totaro_
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(Original post by joe_c.x)
oh ok sound ty i'm probably just gonna learn 1 parable for each module or something then explain the parable link it to the 12 marker in some way idk
Don't worry all too much about it. There are some parables that can provide answers for a LOT of the questions. What exam board are you with?
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username4368778
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(Original post by totaro_)
Don't worry all too much about it. There are some parables that can provide answers for a LOT of the questions. What exam board are you with?
I'm doing AQA B the full 2 year course not the short course doing catholic christianity and judaism i'm not too hot at re lol
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totaro_
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(Original post by joe_c.x)
I'm doing AQA B the full 2 year course not the short course doing catholic christianity and judaism i'm not too hot at re lol
We're doing a similar course then.

Neither honestly, I scrape by because Catholicism gets shoved down our throats every two seconds.

Just remember some parables and their teachings. There are some key words in each topic you do so you might want to use them. The grade boundaries are high; I'm thinking a 6 will definitely be around 60% so just do bits here and there and you should be okay.
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username4368778
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(Original post by totaro_)
Catholicism gets shoved down our throats every two seconds.
I FELT THAT and i know that all too well lol
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ellieedjsk
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love your neighbour as you love yourself= easy 9
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username4368778
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(Original post by vivt11)
love thy neighbour
funny you should say that, the reason i wrote this thread was in response to an excerpt from an article i read:
"Use of quotations: many students used religious teachings in a descriptive way rather than using them to support their evaluation and judgement. Sometimes, quotations were used inappropriately. There was an over-reliance on particular quotations e.g. “Love thy neighbour”"

immediately it got me thinking "do i need to know any proper quotes" hence why i wrote this lol
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agreed haha only use it if its relevant
(Original post by joe_c.x)
funny you should say that, the reason i wrote this thread was in response to an excerpt from an article i read:
"Use of quotations: many students used religious teachings in a descriptive way rather than using them to support their evaluation and judgement. Sometimes, quotations were used inappropriately. There was an over-reliance on particular quotations e.g. “Love thy neighbour”"

immediately it got me thinking "do i need to know any proper quotes" hence why i wrote this lol
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ScoutLeopard
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I am in a similar situation. I go to a church of England school were RE is mandatory for GCSE and, like you, I want to further my education with Computer Science (and therefore maths).

Quotes are not that important as they are only worth 8 marks throughout both papers (for Edexcel). It is still good to know them as you can use them in your 12 markers which can hopefully boost your score there as well.
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via._x
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If i’m using a quote in my exam, do i need to memorise/include the (e.g) ‘John 23:5’? It’s difficult enough to memorise the quote so i’m worried about memorising the numbers as well.
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(Original post by via._x)
If i’m using a quote in my exam, do i need to memorise/include the (e.g) ‘John 23:5’? It’s difficult enough to memorise the quote so i’m worried about memorising the numbers as well.
No you don't at all. I did GCSE RE and all you really need is a bunch of quotes (maybe about 7 quotes) that can spread over a wide range of topics/questions that are very easy to remember. Obviously remembering that it was John (using ur example), would be beneficial but don't panic if you are in your exam and you don't remember.
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via._x
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(Original post by something_orphic)
No you don't at all. I did GCSE RE and all you really need is a bunch of quotes (maybe about 7 quotes) that can spread over a wide range of topics/questions that are very easy to remember. Obviously remembering that it was John (using ur example), would be beneficial but don't panic if you are in your exam and you don't remember.
Ahh thank you!!
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