alice.eliza112
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I have chosen to do A-levels in Geography, English Lit and Psychology but for my fourth I am stick between EPQ and AS French? I am good at French but apparently it gets so much harder in sixth form and is there any point, as unis ask for just three A-levels, not four. What should I do?
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username3508100
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I loved French at GCSE and was one of the better ones in class, but I found it really hard at A Level because I didn't enjoy it as much and ended up dropping it, but that's just my experience. Personally, I'd stick with 3 A Levels, they're enough work as it is and you can focus more and get better grades without worrying about a fourth
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idk01
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Both an EPQ and AS French would be very rewarding. I personally did an EPQ in a topic I have interest in, and am starting to relearn French after my GCSE teachers did a disgraceful job.

Although three a-levels is usually all that's necessary, four would seem more impressive, but this depends on whether you'd continue to do it into A-level or just stop at AS. In this case it may be better to pursue French outside of school and do an EPQ in a subject of your interest in year 12. This means you could link the EPQ to a subject you might be thinking of studying at uni, while at the same time improving your french. Perhaps at the end of year 13, you could enter some French-based course that could give some proof of your ability to speak/write French?
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artful_lounger
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I'd probably suggest an EPQ unless you wanted to continue to a French degree at uni. If you are just interested in the language from a practical, rather than academic, perspective, you can look for ways to develop your language skills in an extracurricular fashion alongside your other subjects, but retaining the flexibility to focus on your core academics as and when needed. You could even continue with the academic aspects by doing your EPQ on some French-related topic (e.g. French literature, history, or culture).

If you don't need A-level French for your future uni plans, then I'd suggest not pursuing it in this case. Although technically if you wanted to maximise your options for potential degree choices, then it would be better to take French over psychology since the latter is not a requirement for any degree programme. However as you noted, language A-levels are (apparently, I didn't do one) a significant jump up from GCSE and require a lot of ongoing work to keep on top of things.
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