difference between a coronary sulcus and a coronary sinus? medical school question Watch

Kalabamboo
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^^
Thank you very much guys!!!!
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Hi Kalabamboo (btw, time flies; I am sure you were doing A levels very recently - congrats on entry into med school! ).

A coronary sinus is a small bulge at the origin of each of the coronary arteries (right and left) on from the very proximal (ascending) aorta with the ostium providing the opening into the coronary arteries.

The coronary sulcus is a narrow groove running along the infero-medial part of the right anterior outer surface of the heart that represents the border between the right atrium and the right ventricle. The right coronary artery runs along it.

GENERAL TERMINOLOGY:
A sulcus, in general anatomy, is a groove - e.g. occipito-parietal sulcus between the corresponding lobes of the cerebrum in the case of the brain, whereas a sinus is like a (rounded) swelling or cavity e.g. [in the brain again] the cavernous sinus is a vein technically, within which run the ICA (internal carotid artery) and some cranial nerves (III (oculomotor) and IV (trochlear) in the lateral wall and VI (abducent) within the sinus near the ICA (these latter have important clinical importance as in cavernous sinus thrombosis).

M (former medical student)
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi Kalabamboo (btw, time flies; I am sure you were doing A levels very recently - congrats on entry into med school! ).

A coronary sinus is a small bulge at the origin of each of the coronary arteries (right and left) on from the very proximal (ascending) aorta with the ostium providing the opening into the coronary arteries.

The coronary sulcus is a narrow groove running along the infero-medial part of the right anterior outer surface of the heart that represents the border between the right atrium and the right ventricle. The right coronary artery runs along it.

GENERAL TERMINOLOGY:
A sulcus, in general anatomy, is a groove - e.g. occipito-parietal sulcus between the corresponding lobes of the cerebrum in the case of the brain, whereas a sinus is like a (rounded) swelling or cavity e.g. [in the brain again] the cavernous sinus is a vein technically, within which run the ICA (internal carotid artery) and some cranial nerves (III (oculomotor) and IV (trochlear) in the lateral wall and VI (abducent) within the sinus near the ICA (these latter have important clinical importance as in cavernous sinus thrombosis).

M (former medical student)
Thank you very much
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
Thank you very much
Please check the correction I have posted at your other post (same Q):
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...230&highlight=

M
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