Master's in Management - Cambridge vs LBS vs LSE vs Imperial

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VigilVigil
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#1
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#1
Which one is the most prestigious?
Which one has the best career opportunities?
Which one is the most academic/theoretical?
Overall, which one would you recommend the most?
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V944817
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In my opinion, LBS/Cambridge > LSE > Imperial. Not sure about academic and theoretical part though.
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LoydIrving
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Cambridge>Imperial/LBS>LSE
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JoBy1NoBa
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(Original post by VigilVigil)
Which one is the most prestigious?
Which one has the best career opportunities?
Which one is the most academic/theoretical?
Overall, which one would you recommend the most?
I noticed this thread is quite old but I'll answer your question for other prospective students!

I'm in the MPhil Management program at Cambridge so I'll try to give you a non-biased response!

Prestige is quite subjective, it really depends on the industry. I don't have information about the prestige associated with each program so I cannot compare on a program-to-program basis but I can give you my opinion at the university level.

In my opinion, Cambridge has the best reputation in general, LBS has the best reputation in the business world, LSE has great reputation in the economics/politics/banking world, and Imperial has great reputation in engineering/sciences.

No first-hand information about other courses, but I've heard LBS is longer and more intense in terms of workloads.

For career opportunities, I recommend you to check out alumni's profiles on LinkedIn on each school to have an idea. My class has secured pretty good offers!

I'm sure all 4 programs are good, but I'll give you a quick sales pitch for Cambridge MPhil in Management
1. Cohorts are very smart, friendly, humble, and collegial coming from many different countries. People thought the cohort would be more competitive, but that's not the case!
2. Small cohort of 40-50 means that you get know other students and professors quickly. It's also easier to organise class-level events like trips, college formal swaps (we organised >6 college formals with high turnouts!), and pubs
3. The Cambridge Experience - College system (formals, sports at the college-level), beautiful Judge Business School, awesome community
4. Diversity of people inside and outside class and college, more exposure to different degrees programmes
5. It's not London, Cambridge is a beautiful, quiet, safe town. You can always work in London after graduating

If you have any specific questions, happy to answer!
Last edited by JoBy1NoBa; 2 years ago
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Buttmuffin
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(Original post by VigilVigil)
Which one is the most prestigious?
Which one has the best career opportunities?
Which one is the most academic/theoretical?
Overall, which one would you recommend the most?
The Cambridge Master's in Management only accepts applicants with non-finance/business/management backgrounds, so it's fundamentally different from the rest. This makes it *significantly* easier to get into than the others if you're eligible, simply because by making finance undergrads ineligible to apply, you've removed the most competitive candidates.
Offer rate for 2016/2017 was 32% (280 applicants, 89 offers made).

I knew someone who applied on deadline day with a STEM 75% grade from a red brick uni, no GMAT and little prior work experience - and received an offer. I would not expect this at the others.

That being said, I would personally pick:
LBS>Cambridge>LSE>Imperial

Take a look at LBS's MiM employment report vs the others and it's pretty obvious. It's the only MiM that's brave enough to consistently detail out employment opportunities by country, base salary and bonuses; the program also (compulsory) requires the GMAT, which automatically filters out the 'weak' candidates.

If you're international (Non-US/UK/Europe) and will go home after the degree - you should 100% pick Cambridge and be known as a genius in your home country. Because nothing else will matter.
Last edited by Buttmuffin; 2 years ago
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JoBy1NoBa
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(Original post by Buttmuffin)
The Cambridge Master's in Management only accepts applicants with non-finance/business/management backgrounds, so it's fundamentally different from the rest.

It's also *significantly* easier (offer rate of 32% in 2016/2017 cycle; acceptance rate is irrelevant) to get into than the others, simply because by making finance undergrads ineligible to apply, you've removed the most competitive candidates.

That being said, I would personally pick:
LBS>Cambridge>LSE>Imperial

If you're international (Non-US/UK/Europe) and will go home after the degree - you should pick Cambridge and be seen as a genius in your home country, because nothing else will matter.
Let me add some latest information

MPhil Management only accepts students not from business and management undergraduate degrees, and it does accept students with more quantitative backgrounds (Finance, Economics, etc...). In my class, there are people from PPE and pure finance undergrads.

I disagree to say that a programme is "easier to get into" if there are no comparable data from other schools. Furthermore, the "competitiveness" also depends on the entry requirement and available seats. For example, Cambridge requires a minimum of 1st class degree while LBS, LSE, and Imperial requires a minimum of 2:1 class degree, so Cambridge put off UK and non-UK applicants because the entry requirement is just too high.

To avoid confusion, let me define the acceptance rate as the ratio of final enrollment divided by the total number of applications. For 2019/20, Cambridge has an acceptance rate of ~10% at around ~50 spaces. LBS does not release its acceptance rate and has ~250 spaces. For 2015/16, LSE had an acceptance rate of 16% at around ~80 spaces. For 2019-21, Harvard MBA has an acceptance rate of ~10% at ~950 spaces. If you say acceptance rate is not relevant, I'm not sure what else can be.

Note that the acceptance rate does not tell the whole story, but could serve as an indication of how competitive the admission is. I believe LBS is a smart business school which is why they choose to not openly release their number of applications / acceptance rate for the MiM programme as part of their marketing (I could be wrong!). I and some other classmates received multiple offers and chose Cambridge in the end. If I could choose again based on my personal preferences, I would still rank Cambridge>LBS>LSE>Imperial.

Despite fewer people apply because of the 2 restrictions (non-business undergrad and 1st class degree), I would argue that the ~10% acceptance at Cambridge is actually more competitive. Let's assume the restrictions for Cambridge are removed, then more people are eligible to apply and the acceptance rate will drop due to limited spaces. I'm not trying to say which program is better, but each has its own flavour

The reasons why LBS is capable of producing the most detailed MiM report in the UK are:
1) they have 5x bigger student intake than Cambridge which means they have more data points, thus more representative
2) they have a bigger budget (5x from tuition fees) and a much bigger team in charge of producing the report, doing admission tours, etc...
3) they are a focused "American" style business school and spends a lot of cash on marketing
4) they are a pure business school so they have less bureaucracy compared to business schools within a larger university ecosystem

I bet all these schools have a diverse student group coming from the UK and outside (regardless if they come from the top university of their country or not). LBS is a great school, so don't take my input the wrong way
Last edited by JoBy1NoBa; 2 years ago
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