Nchen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
I’m currently in my first year studying Maths, PE and Biology at A level with ambitions to become a pilot in the RAF. I have no experience flying and have never been in the cadets. I’m just beginning my research into what it takes to become a pilot.

I was wondering what difference it would make to go to university and get a degree befor I apply? What are the benifits and are they significant enough to spend a further 3/4 years studying?
Last edited by Nchen; 6 months ago
0
reply
RAF_Adam
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
(Original post by Nchen)
I’m currently in my first year studying Maths, PE and Biology at A level with ambitions to become a pilot in the RAF. I have no experience flying and have never been in the cadets. I’m just beginning my research into what it takes to become a pilot.

I was wondering what difference it would make to go to universities and get a degree befor I apply? What are the benifits and are they significant enough to spend a further 3/4 years studying?
Hi

Have you already had a read through all of the information and entry requirements listed on the role page on the RAF Recruitment website? If not, then do!

The entry requirements are the minimum needed to be able to apply for the role, as long as you meet them you have the same chance as everyone else that applies. However, it's how you do at Officer and Aircrew Selection that will determine whether you get to be a pilot in the RAF.

Aptitude Test, Interviews, Leadership and Teamwork exercises and test, Medical, Fitness etc all come into account.

You don't need a degree, but the time spent at university can be useful in terms of life experience and knowledge and areas you can gain experience of. Leadership and teamwork are a big element. You're applying to be an officer, you're expected to show maturity and leadership qualities etc.
The decision to do a degree is entirely yours, it's whether you think you have the qualities required by the RAF at the age after your A levels?

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
0
reply
Nchen
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#3
Hi Adam thanks for your advice!
I have read through the requirements and am happy that after I complete my A levels I will meet them all. I currently coach children in rugby and have coached adults and young people in sailing. I play rugby for my local club and at regional level. Would a degree massively help my progression or have an effect on salary/ benefits? Would you recommend getting some flying experience/ visiting bases to make me a better candidate?
Last edited by Nchen; 6 months ago
0
reply
RAF_Adam
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by Nchen)
Hi Adam thanks for your advice!
I have read through the requirements and am happy that after I complete my A levels I will meet them all. I currently coach children in rugby and have coached adults and young people in sailing. I play rugby for my local club and at regional level. Would a degree massively help my progression or have an effect on salary/ benefits? Would you recommend getting some flying experience/ visiting bases to make me a better candidate?
Hi

From the sound of it your have a lot of experience in areas that will prove useful for OASC and the start of your career. Again, as stated, it's how you do at OASC that will be the determining factor, not whether you have a degree or not. Only you know whether you want to get a a degree before you apply, we can't make that decision for you. It CAN be beneficial as it gives you more life experience, but there are more deciding factors than that.

As for flying experience, the RAF trains everyone from scratch, so it's not needed. Stations visits would be useful for you to get an idea of what the RAF is like, chat to serving personnel etc. You would need to speak to the station you want to visit direct to arrange anything though as they will deal with that locally as some roles/areas it's not possible to see etc, but that depends on the role you're applying for.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 months ago
#5
One thing to be aware of for prospective pilots is the recent and ongoing **** up of the flying training system MFTS.

It's taking a very long time to get through training, involving lots of time in holding posts doing filler work before slots become available. It's been in the news recently and it's making a lot of noise, hopefully that'll start kicking people into action, but the knock on effect is a reduction in pilot places in the short-term to try and ease the throughput burden.

Having a couple of years before entry (ie, going to uni) could well help you avoid that mess as it might be fixed by then, it could also allow you to join the UAS and develop a greater insight into an RAF career.
0
reply
LoyaltyAb0veAll
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 months ago
#6
(Original post by Drewski)
One thing to be aware of for prospective pilots is the recent and ongoing **** up of the flying training system MFTS.

It's taking a very long time to get through training, involving lots of time in holding posts doing filler work before slots become available. It's been in the news recently and it's making a lot of noise, hopefully that'll start kicking people into action, but the knock on effect is a reduction in pilot places in the short-term to try and ease the throughput burden.

Having a couple of years before entry (ie, going to uni) could well help you avoid that mess as it might be fixed by then, it could also allow you to join the UAS and develop a greater insight into an RAF career.
Don't you just love privatisation of public services? To me it seems so odd why the government can't just carry out training themselves especially since with the recent budget increases. Handing it to a company will just mean that entity will do whatever necessary to secure a profit. Typical tory mentality.. exploiting the working class while prioritising their own pockets.
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
(Original post by LoyaltyAb0veAll)
Don't you just love privatisation of public services? To me it seems so odd why the government can't just carry out training themselves especially since with the recent budget increases. Handing it to a company will just mean that entity will do whatever necessary to secure a profit. Typical tory mentality.. exploiting the working class while prioritising their own pockets.
1. MFTS came about in 2006 while Labour were in charge. Along with the other military PFI deals like AirTanker.
2. We were at a point with training where all the aircraft were coming up on their end of service life, where all the syllabi were in need of overhaul, and when we were running out of instructors. Having a separate body to come in and pay for the huge ticket items made reasonable sense. Yes, there have been budget increases, but they wouldn't have come close to covering it.
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 months ago
#8
UKMFTS was a complete shambles and an obvious crash waiting to happen as far back as 2003 when I worked on the programme. We knew that whatever aircraft replacement for Hawk we chose, the answer would be political and not requirements based. There was also no sustainable way to provide qualified instructors, the model was based on the surge of ex-pilots leaving during a redundancy tranche, but the numbers clearly weren't supported by natural retirements from a smaller RAF.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (164)
24.59%
Pop (164)
24.59%
Jazz (26)
3.9%
Classical (40)
6%
Hip-Hop (121)
18.14%
Electronic (43)
6.45%
Indie (109)
16.34%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise