Got 4 Rejections for Medicine for the 2nd Year in a row. What should I do???

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jj.repinec
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When I applied the first year around I got a post-interview rejection from UCL and then pre-interview rejections from Southampton, St George's and Bristol. But since I achieved A*A*A last year I decided to take a gap year to reapply.
During my gap year this year I got 4 interviews from UCL, Imperial, Cardiff and UEA so I thought my chances would be pretty high this year. But I ended up getting 4 post-interview rejections from all four universities. I have requested feedback from all four universities and Imperial were the only one to reply with a such a vague response. I am clueless on what to do now and I am looking for some advice? Any help would be much appreciated.
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username3900288
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Phone them and ask why you were rejected.
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jp.lk12
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(Original post by jj.repinec)
When I applied the first year around I got a post-interview rejection from UCL and then pre-interview rejections from Southampton, St George's and Bristol. But since I achieved A*A*A last year I decided to take a gap year to reapply.
During my gap year this year I got 4 interviews from UCL, Imperial, Cardiff and UEA so I thought my chances would be pretty high this year. But I ended up getting 4 post-interview rejections from all four universities. I am clueless on what to do now and I am looking for some advice? Any help would be much appreciated.
I recommend you find out why the unis rejected you this year. If you're making it to the interview but getting post-interview rejections then the unis think you're academically strong enough to study medicine but you're not doing well enough in interview. You should try to get in through clearing this year, and if that's not, try and reapply next year and work on your interview skills in your gap year. Maybe you could consider applying to a university like Aberdeen that doesn't only look at your interview when determining who gets offers post-interview. There's nothing wrong with taking two gap years, but make sure you use your gap years effectively.
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jj.repinec
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(Original post by Qup)
Phone them and ask why you were rejected.
Imperial was the only one to reply yet. Their feedback was so vague and looks like the kind of feedback they would send to every rejection:
"In addition to academic ability, the interview panel assesses candidates on the following criteria: Motivation to study medicine; realistic approach to medicine as a career; capacity to deal with stress; evidence of working as a leader and as part of a team; ability to multi-task; potential contribution to Medical School life; communications skills and maturity of character. Candidates are also graded on their response to a Values Based Scenario. In order to be made an offer, candidates must demonstrate at interview that they meet all of these criteria.
We enjoyed meeting you but tough decisions have to be made and unfortunately your performance at interview was not quite as strong as some of the other candidates. You scored well in multi-tasking and maturity. The panel felt your performance improved as the interview went on and that your nerves may have impacted your performance. They commented that your answers needed more depth and insight in order to be successful."
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jj.repinec
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(Original post by jp.lk12)
I recommend you find out why the unis rejected you this year. If you're making it to the interview but getting post-interview rejections then the unis think you're academically strong enough to study medicine but you're not doing well enough in interview. You should try to get in through clearing this year, and if that's not, try and reapply next year and work on your interview skills in your gap year. Maybe you could consider applying to a university like Aberdeen that doesn't only look at your interview when determining who gets offers post-interview. There's nothing wrong with taking two gap years, but make sure you use your gap years effectively.
From my interview performance last year (especially for UCL), I really tried to improve on my interviews skills by having lots of mock interviews and going to interview workshops and even from going to real interviews. Especially with having 4 interviews this year I thought I would improve through that. My only worry with taking a second gap year is that the same thing is likely to happen again.
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username3900288
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(Original post by jj.repinec)
Imperial was the only one to reply yet. Their feedback was so vague and looks like the kind of feedback they would send to every rejection:
"In addition to academic ability, the interview panel assesses candidates on the following criteria: Motivation to study medicine; realistic approach to medicine as a career; capacity to deal with stress; evidence of working as a leader and as part of a team; ability to multi-task; potential contribution to Medical School life; communications skills and maturity of character. Candidates are also graded on their response to a Values Based Scenario. In order to be made an offer, candidates must demonstrate at interview that they meet all of these criteria.
We enjoyed meeting you but tough decisions have to be made and unfortunately your performance at interview was not quite as strong as some of the other candidates. You scored well in multi-tasking and maturity. The panel felt your performance improved as the interview went on and that your nerves may have impacted your performance. They commented that your answers needed more depth and insight in order to be successful."
Hmm....

It isn't vague actually. In fact, all the reasons as to why you were rejected are right there, in the feedback comment.

You have to remember that grades, personal statement and extracurriculars are not the only thing that determines whether or not you to enrol onto a degree course, hell, these are not even the only thing that determines whether you will enrol gain a job even. In their eyes, you have good maturity and are good at multitasking, but in regards to whether you can deal with stress, how good your communication skills are, are able to leading or contributing to a team, etc., it would appear that you were lacking in those areas when compared to other candidates. It even implies this to be the case due to mentioning that your nerves might have impacted your overall interview performance. Were you anxious? Because they can sense this either in your body language, voice, eyes, expression, and all that, and in medicine, a worker having anxiety can and will affect their medical judgement, which is dangerous.

It also says that your responses to their questions require more depth and insight, so there is that as well.
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A Rolling Stone
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you clearly lack the reasoning skills of a doctor if you thought it was a good idea to apply to only the more competitive medical schools after you'd already taken a gap year
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jj.repinec
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(Original post by CollectiveSoul)
you clearly lack the reasoning skills of a doctor if you thought it was a good idea to apply to only the more competitive medical schools after you'd already taken a gap year
Thanks for that.
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jp.lk12
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(Original post by jj.repinec)
From my interview performance last year (especially for UCL), I really tried to improve on my interviews skills by having lots of mock interviews and going to interview workshops and even from going to real interviews. Especially with having 4 interviews this year I thought I would improve through that. My only worry with taking a second gap year is that the same thing is likely to happen again.
If you really want to study medicine, it's worth to try and keep improving and try again, even if it could happen again. Really use the feedback given by universities. If you don't get in after a second gap year, then it might be time to try something else.

You might also want to consider studying medicine outside of the UK. Countries like Poland and Czech have medicine programs in English and cost about the same as studying in the UK. If you want to live and work in the UK it doesn't really matter where you study medicine, there's a shortage of doctors so you'll get a job. If you really want to study medicine, it's worth considering these options too.
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jj.repinec
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(Original post by CollectiveSoul)
you clearly lack the reasoning skills of a doctor if you thought it was a good idea to apply to only the more competitive medical schools after you'd already taken a gap year
There are applicants who have retaken their A-levels and have been able to get into Bristol and Kings for Medicine. Schools that are even more competitive to the ones I have applied to.
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jp.lk12
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(Original post by CollectiveSoul)
you clearly lack the reasoning skills of a doctor if you thought it was a good idea to apply to only the more competitive medical schools after you'd already taken a gap year
They had good a level grades and they got to interview, so they don't lack reasoning skills. The hardest part is actually getting to the interview which they managed. It's just the interview part which isn't going too well. Cardiff and UEA are not the most competitive medical schools (although still competitive because all medical schools are competitive), so the choice of schools was a good mix.
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OnionRing
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Hi there,

Very sorry for your rejections and the position you're in now. if it helps, i was in your position back in 2013.

My first application, 4 pre-interview rejections for 2012 entry. I then went on to get AAA and take a gap year..
My second application, 3 pre-interview rejections and 1 post-interview rejection for 2013 entry

At this point, i was certain if i had tried one more time with lots of interview practise and more confidence, i could get an offer. So i took my second gap year and applied for 2014 entry: ended up with 2 pre-interview rejections and 2 offers.

So i would say apply one more time, look at the feedback they gave you, they actually weren't that vague imo. 4 interviews and no offers means you really need a bit more help with interviews and conveying your strengths and abilities. Nerves are also a factor and a factor that messed up my interview back in 2013 entry.

Good luck!
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Cecelia Tallice
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(Original post by jj.repinec)
When I applied the first year around I got a post-interview rejection from UCL and then pre-interview rejections from Southampton, St George's and Bristol. But since I achieved A*A*A last year I decided to take a gap year to reapply.
During my gap year this year I got 4 interviews from UCL, Imperial, Cardiff and UEA so I thought my chances would be pretty high this year. But I ended up getting 4 post-interview rejections from all four universities. I have requested feedback from all four universities and Imperial were the only one to reply with a such a vague response. I am clueless on what to do now and I am looking for some advice? Any help would be much appreciated.
You could try applying for less competitive unis next year and use this year gaining experience in a healthcare environment.
But if you want my advice I wouldn’t keep wasting your life trying to get into medicine. You need to move on and get on with your life, I know it’s hard to give up on a dream. But it’s clearly not your grades that are the problem so it must be something else they they don’t like. Which is potentially something that you can’t change, such as your character or the fact that you’ve taken a gap year. The problem is that medical schools favour students coming straight from A levels because the information is relatively fresh. It is very hard to get into medicine as a mature student unless you show exceptional qualities.
You’ll have to weigh up how much you really want to be a doctor. You have to go above and beyond for medicine. Did you do something medical related in your gap year?
Last edited by Cecelia Tallice; 2 years ago
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AzureCeleste
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Try applying to uni's where they consider the whole application post interview as it seems that's what has let you down (so like Edinburgh (no interview!), Aberdeen and there will be others)
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OnionRing
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FIrst if all, medical schools don’t favour school leaves over gap year students or mature students. That’s just false. What fresh information??? Have you got any evidence to back that up?

In fact, I would say gap year students are MORE likely to get in due to their gap year experience on top of the grades

If he wants to try one more time, he can. Although I do agree, he will need to look for other options if medicine doesn’t work out
(Original post by Cecelia Tallice)
You could try applying for less competitive unis next year and use this year gaining experience in a healthcare environment.
But if you want my advice I wouldn’t keep wasting your life trying to get into medicine. You need to move on and get on with your life, I know it’s hard to give up on a dream. But it’s clearly not your grades that are the problem so it must be something else they they don’t like. Which is potentially something that you can’t change, such as your character or the fact that you’ve taken a gap year. The problem is that medical schools favour students coming straight from A levels because the information is relatively fresh. It is very hard to get into medicine as a mature student unless you show exceptional qualities.
You’ll have to weigh up how much you really want to be a doctor. You have to go above and beyond for medicine. Did you do something medical related in your gap year?
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jp.lk12
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Edinburgh is really competitive though and they make it a lot harder for non scottish students to get in. Would not recommend applying to Edinburgh unless you want to risk not getting an offer. Edinburgh interview graduates andmature students, so they might interview someone who is on their second gap year (but I'm not sure). They're also considering using interviews as part of their application process for all applicants, so it's possible that all applicants will be interviewed next year.
(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Try applying to uni's where they consider the whole application post interview as it seems that's what has let you down (so like Edinburgh (no interview!), Aberdeen and there will be others)
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jp.lk12
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I agree with you, and medical schools definitely favour achieved grades over predicted grades.
(Original post by OnionRing)
FIrst if all, medical schools don’t favour school leaves over gap year students or mature students. That’s just false. What fresh information??? Have you got any evidence to back that up?

In fact, I would say gap year students are MORE likely to get in due to their gap year experience on top of the grades

If he wants to try one more time, he can. Although I do agree, he will need to look for other options if medicine doesn’t work out
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Space_cadet44
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Don't give up on your dream. You want to study medicine so keep that dream alive. The hardest part is picking yourself up and going again but remember that you're young and have a lot of life to live. It will eventually come even if it takes a little bit longer. My advice for the next round of applications is to apply to more universities and maybe try to understand different aspects of teaching for each university by contacting faculty. Really understand what they look for and use that knowledge in your interviews next year. You will get it. Never give up!
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AzureCeleste
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(Original post by jp.lk12)
Edinburgh is really competitive though and they make it a lot harder for non scottish students to get in. Would not recommend applying to Edinburgh unless you want to risk not getting an offer. Edinburgh interview graduates andmature students, so they might interview someone who is on their second gap year (but I'm not sure). They're also considering using interviews as part of their application process for all applicants, so it's possible that all applicants will be interviewed next year.
Competitive yes. But if you have the grades and a very high UKCAT score you're half way there. It's just the PS which you need to do well on. Obviously it depends how old they are, if they are under 21 still then it may be worth it.
The interview is still in the talks and I'd be surprised if applicants were to start being interviewed- it has been talked about for a few years and nothing has happened as of yet
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sammyj97
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(Original post by Cecelia Tallice)
I wouldn’t keep wasting your life trying to get into medicine. You need to move on and get on with your life, I know it’s hard to give up on a dream. But it’s clearly not your grades that are the problem so it must be something else they they don’t like. Which is potentially something that you can’t change, such as your character or the fact that you’ve taken a gap year. The problem is that medical schools favour students coming straight from A levels because the information is relatively fresh. It is very hard to get into medicine as a mature student unless you show exceptional qualities.
This is quite possibly the worst piece of advice I’ve ever heard. Not to mention completely incorrect.
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