How much money will I need to live at uni? Watch

Acsel
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
It's a broken system when that is the case to be honest. I got A*AA I deserve to be at uni I worked hard for those grades. Why should I have to have considered alternatives to uni just because my father earns a lot but is abusive so shares none of it. It's penalising people for no reason. The government needs to stop assuming that families will give their children their money. If it was a working class person being told to rethink uni because of money reform would be called for but this status quo is apparently acceptable to student finance :/
Agreed, it's a system that predominantly works quite well unless you're a student from a high income family that doesn't get as much support. And since that's a fairly small proportion of students, it's unlikely to change any time soon. I think everyone should have access to the same level of support regardless of family situation. But then we'd just have the opposite problem, where students from low income family feel disadvantaged compared to those from high income families who get full loan and financial support from family. There isn't a scenario where we all win because we aren't all equal; one group will always be worse off.

This is where I think university level education should be made less accessible. Rather than simply handing out loans to students so they can go straight from college to uni, force students to earn some of the income they'll need to survive through gap year work. Which has the added benefit of making students more employable as a result of having done some work before.
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Mshabana
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You should try to get a zero hour job. I work for Deliveroo and make about £13-15 an hour, minimum £10. So 3 hours a week will bring me at about £40. You pick when you work so if you have plans or study you can just cancel a shift (if you work in a booking zone) or when free you can make more money.
Use my referral code if interested MU288880
I'm happy to answer any questions
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Acsel)
Agreed, it's a system that predominantly works quite well unless you're a student from a high income family that doesn't get as much support. And since that's a fairly small proportion of students, it's unlikely to change any time soon. I think everyone should access to the same level of support regardless of family situation. But then we'd just have the opposite problem, where students from low income family feel disadvantaged compared to those from high income families who get full loan and financial support from family. There isn't a scenario where we all win because we aren't all equal; one group will always be worse off.

This is where I think university level education should be made less accessible. Rather than simply handing out loans to students so they can go straight from college to uni, force students to earn some of the income they'll need to survive through gap year work. Which has the added benefit of making students more employable as a result of having done some work before.
Yeh I agree (I hope you didn't think was aimed at you was aimed at the system)
I really don't know what the solution is, it's just very black and white of the government to think high income household = well off child. Ideally your second point would be a thing but it's so hard to get a job have been applying every summer since the end of AS and have got nowhere sadly it's more who you know with those smaller part-time work things and I don't know many relatives etc
It's certainly a tough situation , I just wish it was more fair
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Acsel
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yeh I agree (I hope you didn't think was aimed at you was aimed at the system)
I really don't know what the solution is, it's just very black and white of the government to think high income household = well off child. Ideally your second point would be a thing but it's so hard to get a job have been applying every summer since the end of AS and have got nowhere sadly it's more who you know with those smaller part-time work things and I don't know many relatives etc
It's certainly a tough situation , I just wish it was more fair
I didn't think it was aimed at me, assumed from the first line (and previous posts) it was aimed at the flaws of the system. I agree that it is really black and white, but it's probably the most appropriate assumption unless we start spending a lot more on investigating personal circumstances. Not to mention that starts getting invasive, because it isn't really the government's business how much support a child does or does not get from their parents. It's black and white but mostly works; sometimes we have to settle for "good enough".

There's definitely an element of "who you know" in scenarios like this. Arguably though, that's a valuable life skill you've learned as a result of job searching. Better to find out that contacts are meaningful now, rather than when you graduate and can't get a job because you didn't do enough networking. But with regards to how it could be implemented, if loans were reduced to encourage students to work then theoretically some of the reduced loans would go on paying students on gap years. It wouldn't simply be a matter of making everyone get jobs at their local supermarket, that's impractical and results in an influx of people looking for jobs with not enough to go around. Effectively it means everyone gets the loan, but rather than it being a handout that they pay back through a pseudo-tax when they graduate, instead they earn it by doing real work before uni. Of course some students from well off families may get a handout from parents and don't need to work. But that's where I'd consider making working gap years compulsory. It's not purely about money, the skills gained are valuable as well. I don't think it's a practical system in the slightest and would involve a lot of changes for very little benefit. But in an ideal world...
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henryf8
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(Original post by Mshabana)
You should try to get a zero hour job. I work for Deliveroo and make about £13-15 an hour, minimum £10. So 3 hours a week will bring me at about £40. You pick when you work so if you have plans or study you can just cancel a shift (if you work in a booking zone) or when free you can make more money.
Use my referral code if interested MU288880
I'm happy to answer any questions
Thanks, sounds like a great idea I'll look at again when I get to uni
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henryf8
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yeh I agree (I hope you didn't think was aimed at you was aimed at the system)
I really don't know what the solution is, it's just very black and white of the government to think high income household = well off child. Ideally your second point would be a thing but it's so hard to get a job have been applying every summer since the end of AS and have got nowhere sadly it's more who you know with those smaller part-time work things and I don't know many relatives etc
It's certainly a tough situation , I just wish it was more fair
Yeah it sucks right. Likewise I've been applying for jobs with no luck throughout year 12 and 13. I don't have any extended family nearby so I feel your pain there too. I did have two zero-hour contract jobs, however one of them doesn't reply to me anymore when I sign up for shifts they give out.. The other I'm about to lose as it's a car park attendant and next month we're being replaced by pay and display machines
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
It's a broken system when that is the case to be honest. I got A*AA I deserve to be at uni I worked hard for those grades. Why should I have to have considered alternatives to uni just because my father earns a lot but is abusive so shares none of it. It's penalising people for no reason. The government needs to stop assuming that families will give their children their money. If it was a working class person being told to rethink uni because of money reform would be called for but this status quo is apparently acceptable to student finance :/
Have you considered clicking the button that says you are estranged from your father?
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Have you considered clicking the button that says you are estranged from your father?
I'm not though, it's a complicated situation
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
I'm not though, it's a complicated situation
Can he not lie on the form? Obvs not something that everyone can do but some people are in this position.

Best thing would be to get a part time, term-time job. Especially good if you can get one on campus.
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Acsel
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(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Can he not lie on the form?
And risk not getting any loan when they realise something doesn't add up? Not to mention being implicated in fraud. Lying is a terrible idea.

Not to mention if CoolCavy describes her father as abusive (rather than simply being unwilling to provide financial support), that doesn't sound like the sort of person who would go out of their way to lie on an student loan application.
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by Acsel)
And risk not getting any loan when they realise something doesn't add up? Not to mention being implicated in fraud. Lying is a terrible idea.

Not to mention if CoolCavy describes her father as abusive (rather than simply being unwilling to provide financial support), that doesn't sound like the sort of person who would go out of their way to lie on an student loan application.
*shrug* They don't need to lie, just their father. But as I already said, only a very limited no of people can get away with that. So lets not dwell on the morality of getting your abusive father to commit fraud.

Rather, it would be better for them to get a term-time job, ideally on campus or in a supermarket where pay will be decent and hours flexible. After all, they don't want to take a year out.
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Acsel
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(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
*shrug* They don't need to lie, just their father. But as I already said, only a very limited no of people can get away with that. So lets not dwell on the morality of getting your abusive father to commit fraud.
Arguably irrelevant. If the parent lies on your application for student finance, you are both implicated in committing fraud. It's not that a limited number of people can get away with it, it's purely down to luck. If you don't get found out, you got lucky. Odds are anyone that tries won't be actively outwitting the entire SLC (plus HMRC if they get involved) to "get away with it". I never once mentioned the moral implications, we can totally ignore the moral standpoint and it's still a ridiculously stupid idea.

IDK if the part about getting a job was aimed at CoolCavy (who has mentioned the issues she's had finding a part time job), or the OP (who as far as I can see hasn't made any comments regarding their non-desire to take a gap year). Either way, if the only way you can afford uni is to get a part time job while you're there then I'd consider it irresponsible to go in the first place. There is no guarantee you'll get a job, which has been a recurring theme in this thread, so going to uni then just hoping you get a job is a massive risk. Proper consideration should be given to whether you can afford uni, rather than a YOLO response and just hoping things work out. There are plenty of students who will tell you how that hasn't worked for them.
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MikeFive
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£20 for a week can be enough for food. Try cook with your friends. Use as much discount codes as you can at https://www.vouchers4u.com/ when you buy something in store or online.

Drink less beer!
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by Acsel)
Arguably irrelevant. If the parent lies on your application for student finance, you are both implicated in committing fraud. It's not that a limited number of people can get away with it, it's purely down to luck. If you don't get found out, you got lucky. Odds are anyone that tries won't be actively outwitting the entire SLC (plus HMRC if they get involved) to "get away with it". I never once mentioned the moral implications, we can totally ignore the moral standpoint and it's still a ridiculously stupid idea.

IDK if the part about getting a job was aimed at CoolCavy (who has mentioned the issues she's had finding a part time job), or the OP (who as far as I can see hasn't made any comments regarding their non-desire to take a gap year). Either way, if the only way you can afford uni is to get a part time job while you're there then I'd consider it irresponsible to go in the first place. There is no guarantee you'll get a job, which has been a recurring theme in this thread, so going to uni then just hoping you get a job is a massive risk. Proper consideration should be given to whether you can afford uni, rather than a YOLO response and just hoping things work out. There are plenty of students who will tell you how that hasn't worked for them.
On the 1st part, that isn't quite true as some people are in a situation where HMRC isn't aware of exactly how much they are earning for various reasons (cash in hand, running your own business etc). Also, you would not be committing fraud if your parents lied on the form as they are sent a separate email to 'confirm' the amount they earn - separate to the rest of your application. That being said, we have gone quite the ways from me pointing out a possible shady loophole and I'll not continue to defend the idea if you want to make a huge discussion of it, bcos it is quite clearly not legal lol.

As for the 2nd part I do seem to have got confused between the people asking for advice. *shrug* Still, the whole idea of "don't go to uni unless you already have money" is a load of BS. There would be almost nobody in education if this was the case. OP is an adult, not a child - it is possible to work part time AND go to uni.

Or do you think people from a working class background don't deserve to go to uni bcos our parents aren't rich- or that we should wait till we're 50? So pls stop talking out of your backside, the thing about being an adult is you have to learn to support yourself. The misunderstanding that you shouldn't expect to get a job whilst at uni sounds like you were born with a silver spoon up your a***. It is perfectly reasonable, as shown by the large no of students with a part time job, to find an extra source of income whilst at university. In fact, most universities will have a careers centre to help you find a part time job whilst you are at uni - because they know that most people can't afford to live off student loans alone.

But please, tell me more about how it is irresponsible to go into further education to better yourself.



As a side note: Ofc there is no guarantee you will get any one job, that is why you make sure you have enough money to last for a while - whilst applying to loads of jobs (something a university careers centre will tell you). Not only this but around the time OP starts uni, local companies/stores will be hiring xmas temps, so there will be jobs around.
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Retired_Messiah
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A summer job for some savings and maybe a zero hours contract would do you well if you know you're going to hit negative equity. In the meantime, get a student bank account. They have interest free overdrafts so you can go into the red and be ok. Santander's goes up to £1,500, for example, which would cover you for your -1,300 a year as long as you made most of the money back over the summer before the next academic term starts yeeting on your finances again.

In terms of budget food, you can theoretically live on next to **** all if you're able to cook. I spent a couple of weeks spending only £15 a week and managing to live off that bought stuff plus random non-perishables I'd accumulated in the cupboards. If you hit the real budget hours, the recipes on this site are mad value, but they rely on you cooking in bulk so grab yerself some tupperware.

If you just want inspiration... eastern europe? Man's got a genuinely functional meal plan although not entirely the healthiest.

But general principles:

-Veg is pretty much always cheaper than meat.
-Do not buy pringles
-pasta, rice n oats can be bought in bulk for cheap, will last ages. That holy trinity covers breakfasts, lunches, dinners and flapjacks.
-Cans of beans (as in like, kidney beans in water, not heinz baked bois) and cans of tomatoes are cheap and can make a bajillion things. Other tinned veg, like tinned potatoes, are a waste of time. Barely much cheaper than their value range fresh or frozen equivalents, and yet far worse quality. Don't torture yourself with tins of carrots when a big bag of the things is going for 59p in tesco.
-Scour foreign food aisles for stuff. My local big tesco has some eastern european sausage smoked sausage and the like in one aisle, works out cheaper than buying pepperamis or mattesons smoked sosig and is genuinely better quality anyway. It's lit
-If you go later in the day, more of the yellow discounting stickers come out. They're pretty nice.

Meme principles:
-If you can front the cost for the gear, brewing your own alcohol is far cheaper than buying it in almost every time. (esp. in scottish unis with the minimum alcohol pricing laws.) The gear will eventually pay itself off if you're making good quantities. All perfectly legal as long as you don't sell any of it and don't run a still. Might be best left for second year when you're out of halls...
-use https://www.approvedfood.co.uk/ to see if you can get mad stuff cheap. Had 10 pints worth of cider off them for a fiver before. Requires a minimum spend and you probably won't ever be able to do a weekly shop on it, but can be good for bulk buying snaccs, booze, and things like washing powder.
-Chicken bits individually are a bit expensive. 2-3 quid for a couple of breast fillets that'll last you what, one or two days? Nah fam, whole large chicken in tesco is 4 quid. Buy her up, cut her up, freeze the pieces. Make sure your knife's good.

(Original post by CoolCavy)
It's a broken system when that is the case to be honest. I got A*AA I deserve to be at uni I worked hard for those grades. Why should I have to have considered alternatives to uni just because my father earns a lot but is abusive so shares none of it. It's penalising people for no reason. The government needs to stop assuming that families will give their children their money. If it was a working class person being told to rethink uni because of money reform would be called for but this status quo is apparently acceptable to student finance :/
I'm always perplexed as to why an adult going to uni is implicitly expected to rely on their parents in the first place. I had a uni bursary I was getting cut in half recently because my mum's yearly income went up by 1k. Like that 1k ain't going to me lads, a woman's got bills of her own to pay.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Like if you buy the ingredients for a tomato soup at Sainsburys it comes to £10, so I don't get w0t black magic people are doing to not spend closer to that amount. :/ 1 meal a day? only canned food?

Pls share your weekly shop with me, I need to save money lol.
Your soup recipe got caviar in it or something mate?
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
Your soup recipe got caviar in it or something mate?
Lol, 2 packs of tomatoes (75p each = £1.50) - 1 pack of mixed root veg (£1) (bcos you need more than tomato for tomato soup), 2 tins of chopped tomatoes (£1 each = £2) (bcos 2 packs of tomato is not enough), tomato puree (the garlic one, so I don't need to buy garlic) (55p) and some vegetable stock (£1.20).

Totals at: £6.25 which is less than £10 admittedly. Also I suppose it does make enough for 3 soups. So yeah.... Fair point. xD
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JavaScriptMaster
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If I only had £20 a week for food I'd be dead by tea
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Acsel
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(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
On the 1st part, that isn't quite true as some people are in a situation where HMRC isn't aware of exactly how much they are earning for various reasons (cash in hand, running your own business etc).
People running their own businesses still have to inform HMRC, pay tax accordingly, etc. Running your own business isn't just a free pass to not tell the government what you earn and pay accordingly. People getting cash in hand is fine, but again they still need to declare it in order for tax to be properly calculated. If HMRC aren't aware of earnings and then you try to lie on a student loan application, you're digging a bigger hole.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Also, you would not be committing fraud if your parents lied on the form as they are sent a separate email to 'confirm' the amount they earn - separate to the rest of your application.
That would be down to the courts to decide. They may have to fill in their details independently, but it's still your application. An investigation would be launched to determine what exactly happened. Worth noting the student can somewhat choose what amount to apply for, so if they applied for a high amount and the parent lied, it wouldn't look good. But as you say, this is obviously wrong regardless (it's not a loophole though, it's just plain illegal) so not worth discussing further.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Still, the whole idea of "don't go to uni unless you already have money" is a load of BS.
That's not the point I'm making. It's not about "don't go to uni unless you have money". It's about "don't go to uni unless you can afford it". There's a massive difference between the two. Most students don't have the money to go to uni themselves and rely on student loan. That's absolutely fine. What's not fine is going to uni and not having a way to pay for it.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
OP is an adult, not a child - it is possible to work part time AND go to uni.
Exactly. And as an adult, they have a level of responsibility for themselves. It's possible to get a job and go to uni, but that shouldn't be the only plan. Because if it doesn't happen, you are quite literally financially screwed. You wouldn't move to London on a £500 a month salary, rent a flat for £800 a month then hope you get a job that pays at least £1000 a month so you can live there. That is totally backwards, you make yourself financially stable first then build around that.

The problem here is that most people are terrible at managing money. It's not taught in schools, learning from parents is a mixed bag, etc. And that is ultimately why a lot of people get into debt, buying things on finance they can't afford, getting credit cards they can't pay off and so on.



(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Or do you think people from a working class background don't deserve to go to uni bcos our parents aren't rich- or that we should wait till we're 50? So pls stop talking out of your backside, the thing about being an adult is you have to learn to support yourself. The misunderstanding that you shouldn't expect to get a job whilst at uni sounds like you were born with a silver spoon up your a***. It is perfectly reasonable, as shown by the large no of students with a part time job, to find an extra source of income whilst at university. In fact, most universities will have a careers centre to help you find a part time job whilst you are at uni - because they know that most people can't afford to live off student loans alone.
IDK how you've managed to get so worked up and misinterpret what I've said. My mum is a single parent, who earns so little that I'm fortunate enough to get the maximum amount of maintenance loan. I however also worked in retail for 4 years before uni to help support myself. So you can stop with the silver spoon BS. I've never once said uni shouldn't be accessible to the working class. In fact our current loan system makes it most accessible to those on low income.

But that's all besides the point. Because the OPs issue here is that they're in a high income bracket but are not going to get substantial financial support from parents. If anything, I consider people from low income backgrounds like myself to have it easier, because we simply get handed the maximum loan. The system fails and doesn't work for those from high income backgrounds who don't get financial support. So congrats, your entire rant was a misguided waste of time.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
But please, tell me more about how it is irresponsible to go into further education to better yourself.
Once again, that's not what I've said. It's irresponsible to knowingly put yourself in a situation you cannot afford, which will inevitably cause problems. It's irresponsible to run off to uni, knowing that you are going to run out of money even if you live extra frugal. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a year or two out, making yourself financially stable and then going to uni. And as I've said before, I hugely promote gap years as a chance to get work experience, earn money and generally better prepare yourself for uni.

I'm not telling people that they shouldn't go to uni. I'm telling people that they should wait until they are ready. And for some people, that means not running off at 18, straight after college, when they've not matured and don't have an appropriate way to support themselves.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
As a side note: Ofc there is no guarantee you will get any one job, that is why you make sure you have enough money to last for a while - whilst applying to loads of jobs (something a university careers centre will tell you). Not only this but around the time OP starts uni, local companies/stores will be hiring xmas temps, so there will be jobs around.
There's absolutely no guarantee of that though. So you take enough money to last a few months, get a Christmas temp job, then lose that job after Christmas. Or everyone else has the same idea and then you don't get a job at all. In some cases, there aren't enough jobs to go around; I very much doubt many students are aware of the potential job market at the uni they're heading to. And when things go South, you can't find a job and have no money, what happens then? This can all be avoided by having a more concrete plan before you go, not a wishy washy "I'll find a job when I'm there". Most students get jobs not because they actually need them, but becuse their drinking and party habits mean they plough through more money that intended. I lived with someone last year who got maximum loan, had a part time job and still ended up eating noodles every day because he couldn't afford anything else (but always seemed to afford alcohol).

This all completely ignores other factors, like the viability of having a job and studying (not everyone has time for both), the stress of a job (or not finding a job), the stress of worrying about money and so on. I can safely say I've had a much better (and more valuable) time at uni so far as a result of not needing a job. Part of that comes down to the extra time I have as a result of not working and part of that is a result of the money I had saved from my gap year/working while at college. So on a personal note, you'll have a much more enjoyable uni experience if you don't have to work, which is ultimately something that can be avoided through proper planning and patience.
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Dannyboy2015
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(Original post by Acsel)
People running their own businesses still have to inform HMRC, pay tax accordingly, etc. Running your own business isn't just a free pass to not tell the government what you earn and pay accordingly. [...]
Cool, nice - I'm not going to continue to argue this as already stated.


(Original post by Acsel)
[...] Most students don't have the money to go to uni themselves and rely on student loan. That's absolutely fine. What's not fine is going to uni and not having a way to pay for it.
Yes - getting a job, there isn't exactly a shortage of jobs out there. You don't need a 15 year life plan to go to uni. It is perfect acceptable to go to uni and search for a job there to support yourself - there are a number of organisations to help you do that - I.e. careers centre at uni. You will also find that most Uni's make a point of hiring Students to a large number of roles, both in the SU and across the rest of the uni.


(Original post by Acsel)
[...] It's possible to get a job and go to uni, but that shouldn't be the only plan. Because if it doesn't happen, you are quite literally financially screwed. You wouldn't move to London on a £500 a month salary, rent a flat for £800 a month then hope you get a job that pays at least £1000 a month so you can live there. [...]
Why not? There are lots of jobs available in London and pretty much all of them (bar below min wage jobs) will pay at least that amount.

(Original post by Acsel)
The problem here is that most people are terrible at managing money. It's not taught in schools, learning from parents is a mixed bag, etc. And that is ultimately why a lot of people get into debt, buying things on finance they can't afford, getting credit cards they can't pay off and so on.
You're reaching? Plan on getting a job at uni doesn't mean you're bad at managing money, and it doesn't require a degree to do a bit of maths and work out how much one can spend. Moreover, most people will have about a year at uni before they actually require a job (with a student account). If you are unable to get a job in a year then you are pretty screwed in life anyway.


(Original post by Acsel)
IDK how you've managed to get so worked up and misinterpret what I've said. [...] In fact our current loan system makes it most accessible to those on low income.
Sure... maybe up north where it doesn't cost anything to live, down south if you go to uni even the max loan won't cover your rent in a lot of places - yet people still pull it off. How? By getting a job, because getting a job is not a 'wishy washy' plan. You don't exactly need to have a master plan for the next 10 years of your life to get a part time job for £8-9/hr. You'll find all major supermarkets will hire straight out of school for example. Bearing in mind OP would have roughly a year to get a part time job with a student bank account. - Now perhaps there are ways to improve your chances of getting a part time job quickly whilst at uni, but they are certainly not in any shortage (at least not down south where you actually need a job to go to uni).

(Original post by Acsel)
But that's all besides the point. Because the OPs issue here is that they're in a high income bracket but are not going to get substantial financial support from parents.
If anything, that makes my advice about getting a part time job more relevant, not less.


(Original post by Acsel)
Once again, that's not what I've said. It's irresponsible to knowingly put yourself in a situation you cannot afford, which will inevitably cause problems. It's irresponsible to run off to uni, knowing that you are going to run out of money even if you live extra frugal. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a year or two out, making yourself financially stable and then going to uni. [...]
Lets be clear, you are right in that there is nothing wrong with taking a year or 2 off to earn some money. There is also nothing wrong with going to uni and getting a job to support yourself - like a large number of students do, like a large number of universities support students to do. This is what is pissing me off, planning on getting a job whilst at Uni is not some sort of bad plan. It is a good one.

(Original post by Acsel)
I'm not telling people that they shouldn't go to uni. I'm telling people that they should wait until they are ready. And for some people, that means not running off at 18, straight after college, when they've not matured [...]
Sure? You know of OP's maturity level and a thousand other factors that will affect them?


(Original post by Acsel)
There's absolutely no guarantee of that though. [...]
I think I've addressed this. It is perfectly reasonable to get a job whilst at uni. There is no need to fear monger by implying that it will be a great difficulty and unlikely to happen. There is also no guarantee of getting a job whilst at home, probably made less likely when dealing with an abusive parent as opposed to support from your university.

(Original post by Acsel)
This all completely ignores other factors, like the viability of having a job and studying (not everyone has time for both), the stress of a job (or not finding a job), the stress of worrying about money and so on. [...]
Yes, I made this point rather clearly - but as we know from multiple studies, most people actually do better at studying when they also have the responsibility of work 10-15 hours/week.

Working 2 evenings a week, for most people is not that stressful, ofc I did address this in my earlier posts and state that it could have a minor impact on your grades if you work excessive hours.
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(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Yes - getting a job, there isn't exactly a shortage of jobs out there. You don't need a 15 year life plan to go to uni. It is perfect acceptable to go to uni and search for a job there to support yourself - there are a number of organisations to help you do that - I.e. careers centre at uni. You will also find that most Uni's make a point of hiring Students to a large number of roles, both in the SU and across the rest of the uni.
And yet here we are with plenty of students that struggle to get a job. But again, I'm not saying it isn't acceptable to get a job at uni. I'm saying it's silly to contemplate uni when you can't afford it and your only plan is that you might get a job.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Why not? There are lots of jobs available in London and pretty much all of them (bar below min wage jobs) will pay at least that amount.
Do I seriously have to explain why it's silly to move with no guarantee you'll be able to sustain yourself afterwards? That's ignoring the competitive job market in London. The numbers were to make a point, not to be accurate. Most people do not do something and worry about whether it's financially viable later. Well actually, a lot do and it's what gets them into debt.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Plan on getting a job at uni doesn't mean you're bad at managing money
Once again (this is getting old), that's not what I'm saying. Planning on going to uni when you can't afford it and don't have a concrete plan is what demonstrates poor money management.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Sure... maybe up north where it doesn't cost anything to live, down south if you go to uni even the max loan won't cover your rent in a lot of places
And yet here I am, a student in Portsmouth (which is in the South) who doesn't need a job. My maintenance loan more than covers my living costs, regardless of the savings I had from before uni. There are 25,000 students in the city, they most certainly don't all have jobs. And this is not unique to my uni, it's applicable across the country. Some students get jobs, others do not. There's no "you're in the South, you absolutely need a job".


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
If anything, that makes my advice about getting a part time job more relevant, not less.
I'm not saying it's less relevant. I'm not disagreeing about getting a job either.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Lets be clear, you are right in that there is nothing wrong with taking a year or 2 off to earn some money. There is also nothing wrong with going to uni and getting a job to support yourself - like a large number of students do, like a large number of universities support students to do. This is what is pissing me off, planning on getting a job whilst at Uni is not some sort of bad plan. It is a good one.
Yes, planning on getting a job is better than nothing at all. But not having some backup plan in case that doesn't work out is silly. If you are going to uni, knowing you cannot afford it unless you get a job, then you have a problem if you are not successful getting a job. And it would seem a hell of a lot of people struggle to get a job. I remember a lot of people complaining about how competitive jobs were at the start of each year, purely because there were so many students applying to so few roles by comparison.

You can be pissed off all your like, but voluntarily putting yourself in a position you know you can't afford is objectively silly. If your only plan is "I'll get a job" then that's fine if it works out, and a real problem if it doesn't. Odds are, most students don't have the slightest idea what part time employment prospects may be available to them and are going in woefully unprepared.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Sure? You know of OP's maturity level and a thousand other factors that will affect them?
IDK why you assumed this was about the OP when I used "people" multiple times.


(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
I think I've addressed this. It is perfectly reasonable to get a job whilst at uni. There is no need to fear monger by implying that it will be a great difficulty and unlikely to happen. There is also no guarantee of getting a job whilst at home, probably made less likely when dealing with an abusive parent as opposed to support from your university.
Sure, it sounds perfectly reasonable. In practice, a lot of people struggle. It works out great for some people, and not so great for others. But at the end of the day, most people aren't in that situation and have a choice. There's no guarantee you'll get a job at home, but you're also not competing with potentially hundreds or even thousands of other students that also want jobs. At the end of the day, getting a job at home is more beneficial to most students (it doesn't interfere with studies, no pressure if you can't find a job, etc.). Getting a job at uni is a perfectly reasonable option, but it adds an element of uncertainty that for most people is perfectly avoidable. I've seen plenty of threads on TSR about people who are struggling to get jobs.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Yes, I made this point rather clearly - but as we know from multiple studies, most people actually do better at studying when they also have the responsibility of work 10-15 hours/week.
Care to provide evidence of those studies rather than making unfounded claims? Apart from those who really enjoy their jobs, I think it'd be universally agreed that students would rather be doing something they enjoy instead of working. I can personally say that the 10-15 hours a week I could have had a part time job were much better served doing things I enjoyed, some of which happened to be beneficial to my degree.

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Working 2 evenings a week, for most people is not that stressful, ofc I did address this in my earlier posts and state that it could have a minor impact on your grades if you work excessive hours.
IDK how 10-15 hours a week equates to 2 evenings, unless 5-7 hours is considered an evening. Especially when a lot of contracts (especially in retail) expect you to work weekends.

Also gonna throw out, this is a monumental waste of time, in part because of all the flawed assumptions and misinterpretations. Nothing new is being added here. My original point still stands (and remains objectively correct). Going to uni when you can't afford and it just hoping you can get a job is not a strong decision. Students who cannot afford uni should seriously consider their options rather than just jumping into things. OP is demonstrating that forethought.
Last edited by Acsel; 1 week ago
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