Do you know what selective mutism is? Watch

Mruczega
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#1
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Yes? No?

If yes then what do you know?

I just want to see what people know on the topic.
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CoolCavy
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Yes
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Anonymous #1
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Yep, I’ve had it since age 2.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Mruczega)
Yes? No?

If yes then what do you know?

I just want to see what people know on the topic.
Choosing not to talk. Often following a trauma
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Mruczega
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Choosing not to talk. Often following a trauma
So that's a no. I think you're thinking of elective mutism which is an outdated term for it from when our understanding of it was very weak.
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Mruczega
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yes
I would be glad to hear what you know. I do read up a lot on it so it kinda turned into a hobby.
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jfoo
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Choosing to stay silent rather than having input?
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Anonymous #2
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Kind off. But I wish to know more
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Anonymous #1
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It’s not really a choice to stay quiet. That’s a big misunderstanding of selective mutism but it’s this type of social anxiety disorder where you are unable to speak in certain situations, but in other situations, you can act more like yourself and speak freely without any difficulty.
For example, with me I am probably the most quietest student in school (I can talk but it’s just hard to) but when I’m with my friends/ family, I act completely like an extrovert (people normally freak out when they get to know the real me😂).
My advice on if you meet someone with selective mutism is to not force the person to speak and allow them to get to know you and there environment in there own time, then they might eventually start saying a few words and overtime their verbal communication will improve as they start to feel more comfortable in the environment.
Hope this helps👍
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Mruczega
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(Original post by Anonymous)
It’s not really a choice to stay quiet. That’s a big misunderstanding of selective mutism but it’s this type of social anxiety disorder where you are unable to speak in certain situations, but in other situations, you can act more like yourself and speak freely without any difficulty.
For example, with me I am probably the most quietest student in school (I can talk but it’s just hard to) but when I’m with my friends/ family, I act completely like an extrovert (people normally freak out when they get to know the real me😂).
My advice on if you meet someone with selective mutism is to not force the person to speak and allow them to get to know you and there environment in there own time, then they might eventually start saying a few words and overtime their verbal communication will improve as they start to feel more comfortable in the environment.
Hope this helps👍
Damn, I honestly didn't expect so many people not to know so after seeing all the other comments I am surprised but also glad that someone knows what it is.

Do you have it/used to have it?
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Mruczega
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(Original post by jfoo)
Choosing to stay silent rather than having input?
Oh no but a lot of people get that confused cuz before it was believed that it was out of choice. Since then we have learned a lot more about it. For example, it's not a choice and if you do try the words just don't come out.
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Obolinda
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Yes. Is it like anxiety when speaking in certain situations? They are comfortable to speak in more comfortable situations.
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12aissid
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When someone has the physical ability to speak but does not for psychological reasons. Often they will speak to a a group of people in one situation but not another eg they will speak to family in home but not people at school. It’s often related to social anxiety
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Mruczega
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(Original post by 12aissid)
When someone has the physical ability to speak but does not for psychological reasons. Often they will speak to a a group of people in one situation but not another eg they will speak to family in home but not people at school. It’s often related to social anxiety
Yep
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