Brexit voting week: 'Extension to Article 50' vote passes 412-202 Watch

MrDystopia
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MPs will vote on Theresa May's Brexit deal later after she says she secured "legally binding" changes following last-minute talks with the EU.
The PM said the changes meant the Irish backstop - the insurance policy designed to avoid a hard border in Ireland - could not "become permanent".

She insisted that she had delivered what Parliament asked her to do. Tory Brexiteers and the DUP are taking legal advice on the changes but Labour said the PM had secured nothing new.

The last time Mrs May's withdrawal agreement was put to Parliament in January, it was voted down by a margin of 230.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-47533666

So later on today, Theresa May's deal is up for vote (again). She'#s apparently secured more assurances on the Irish backstop though from the wording this doesn't appear to be very robust at all. Will it be enough to sway MPS to overturn her record loss? We shall see.

This is the first vote in a series of votes to determine what the course of action should be for Brexit. It's summarised in this BBC graphic below:

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Dez
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Well this ought to be fun.
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LostAccount
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No because nothing has changed from the first time around she tried to pass it.

Simply put: Remainers are in charge of government and negotiations. They are the same kind of people like David Cameron who thought that the """reforms""" he secured were 'sufficient' in any meaningful way. In other words, they don't know what 17.5 million people want, or their representatives.

Thus, it is no surprise that those who take Brexit seriously refuse to support it, which in parliamentary arithmetic together with ultraremainers means we're getting nothing, and we're playing Russian roulette to see who blinks first. The ERG can easily force through a No Deal by stopping anything passing until March 29th, which is principled because everything put forward to them has been a pile of crap.

But the EU has recently softened, because they know that a no deal is a catastrophe to the weak Eurozone economy, especially Germany, where a million jobs in the car industry rely on exports to Britain alone. Never underestimate a psycho. That's Germany's game. At first they disbelieved in Brexit. Then in no deal. Not anymore. The EU has gone from "absolutely no chance of extension" to Barnier openly talking about it.

In which case -- extension put forward to parliament - it is likely we'll be stuck in this rut for a lot longer. And the uncertainty for everyone, mostly businesses, will continue forever after. As Parliament will approve it, and now so will the EU. The process of exit will continue to damage the economy, which is proving to be surprisingly resilient and now the fastest growing European major economy.
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Themysticalegg
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I doubt it, sure there will be more yes votes due to brinksmanship however it needs the support of some labour MPs and Corbyn has publicly rejected the new deal. Although I'm sure some Labour supporters will agree with this deal I don't believe there will be enough.
The actions of the ERG will be important as will the DUP tonight they can turn the tide.
https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-br...-idUKKBN1QT0S4

The most likely outcome will be the rejection of a new deal brexit tomorrow and an approval of the extension of article 50 but to what avail?
Barnier has said there will be no third chance.

I think we should point aside political differences and just move on with this deal or just don't Brexit at all.
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shadowdweller
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I'm going to go with a solid no as to whether it will be approved.
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Trotsky's Iceaxe
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May's changes were not substantive.

I'll be surprised if she'll win parliamentary support.

Which means that almost three years after the Brexit referendum and around 3 weeks until the withdrawal date, we still won't know the nature of our withdrawal from the EU.
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Doones
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DUP "source" saying they won't support TM deal tonight.
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AperfectBalance
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Hoping for a no deal.
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Decahedron
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I guess May is heading back to Brussels to beg.
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mojojojo101
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(Original post by Trotsky's Iceaxe)
May's changes were not substantive.

I'll be surprised if she'll win parliamentary support.

Which means that almost three years after the Brexit referendum and around 3 weeks until the withdrawal date, we still won't know the nature of our withdrawal from the EU.
Don't get ahead of yourself, the UK political structure hasn't even managed to decide what it wants let alone how to do it...
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the bear
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the Tories party will come to its senses and back The Leader. the alternative is chaos, Corbyn & Abot in power & the collapse of the Tories party.
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Decahedron
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(Original post by the bear)
the Tories party will come to its senses and back The Leader. the alternative is chaos, Corbyn & Abot in power & the collapse of the Tories party.
Chaos sounds fun :thumbsup:
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todorokishouto
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this is tiring.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by the bear)
the Tories party will come to its senses and back The Leader. the alternative is chaos, Corbyn & Abot in power & the collapse of the Tories party.
Possible that some in the Tory party are wondering when all the blame for this mess really falls, maybe it would be better for a Labour government to take the blame?
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thestudent33
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Hopefully it doesn't pass! Then Labour can push for a second referendum which would be the best possible option for the whole country :thumbsup:
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Xanimede
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(Original post by the bear)
the Tories party will come to its senses and back The Leader. the alternative is chaos, Corbyn & Abot in power & the collapse of the Tories party.
Chaos is an ironic choice of word.

>Britain faces a simple and inescapable choice - stability and strong Government with me, or chaos with Ed Miliband - David Cameron, 2015
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fallen_acorns
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looking pretty disastrous for may.

Will she finally leave if this vote fails? Or is she really going to push for an extension, and keep limping along?
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darkshadow1111
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(Original post by the bear)
the Tories party will come to its senses and back The Leader. the alternative is chaos, Corbyn & Abot in power & the collapse of the Tories party.
That sounds a lot more appealing than the Tories being in power
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Fullofsurprises
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I have Parliament Channel on in the background and right now the Attorney General is debating what he's brought back from the latest talks with the EU.

It's clear that the Hard Brexiteers are determined to ignore any deal, regardless of how watertight. It's unfortunately equally clear that the wording of the draft agreement hasn't really changed, so there's nothing fundamantally new since the last vote. The AG basically says that there's no point worrying about the backstop because we won't ever need to invoke it, due to a binding commitment to negotiate in the Political Agreement, despite the latter itself being non-binding legally. :rolleyes:

Lots of waffle continues about the unviability of separating Northern Ireland from the UK by having special trading arrangements, despite the clear fact that NI already differs legally from the rest of the UK in all kinds of ways. This is clearly being used by both sides - the ERG/DUP are using it to grab the hard brexit that in fact 65% of people in Northern Ireland don't want and the business community of Northern Ireland don't want, whilst the government are pretending they can do nothing but their proposed deal and the backstop because of NI.
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Doones
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
I have Parliament Channel on in the background and right now the Attorney General is debating what he's brought back from the latest talks with the EU.

It's clear that the Hard Brexiteers are determined to ignore any deal, regardless of how watertight. It's unfortunately equally clear that the wording of the draft agreement hasn't really changed, so there's nothing fundamantally new since the last vote. The AG basically says that there's no point worrying about the backstop because we won't ever need to invoke it, due to a binding commitment to negotiate in the Political Agreement, despite the latter itself being non-binding legally. :rolleyes:

Lots of waffle continues about the unviability of separating Northern Ireland from the UK by having special trading arrangements, despite the clear fact that NI already differs legally from the rest of the UK in all kinds of ways. This is clearly being used by both sides - the ERG/DUP are using it to grab the hard brexit that in fact 65% of people in Northern Ireland don't want and the business community of Northern Ireland don't want, whilst the government are pretending they can do nothing but their proposed deal and the backstop because of NI.
The one thing that annoys me most about the DUP is they are treated as speaking for the people of Northern Ireland. They don't even speak for all unionists...
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